Dr. David Pfister

Chewing tobacco means big league risks

May 17, 2015
Ben Roffer / Flickr

As baseball season gets underway, there's a revival of not only hot dogs, but chewing tobacco. Baseball’s history with chewing tobacco began early on, when players sought to keep their mouths from getting dry due to hot, dusty conditions. What are the dangers of chewing tobacco and other forms of smokeless tobacco, and why has it been overlooked even as society clamps down on cigarettes?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Pfister discusses the dangers chewing tobacco has on the mouth area and the entire body. Pfister is the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

Chewing tobacco is one of the oldest methods of consuming tobacco. And even as American society has clamped down on the use of cigarettes, the various forms of smokeless tobacco on the market don't get nearly as much attention. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care,"  hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. David Pfister, chief of the Head and Neck Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City about why this kind of tobacco is so dangerous.

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Any diagnosis of cancer can be scary. But cancers of the head and neck bring unique challenges because of the importance of this region to the body. These cancers can impact a patient’s ability to speak, swallow or breathe.

A cancer diagnosis is never welcome. But cancers of the head and neck can be particularly difficult to diagnose and treat. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. David Pfister, the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about the risk factors for these types of cancer.

Lorraine Rapp:  What are the most common forms of cancer that appear in the head and neck regions?