end of life

This week: Sleep research, STDs and estate planning

May 3, 2017

Most living things -- including humans, plants and fruit flies -- follow 24-hour cycles known as circadian rhythms, which influence sleep and other physiologic processes.

Neuroscientist Amita Sehgal talks about her research on fruit flies and what it tells us about human sleep. Sehgal, from the University of Pennsylvania, was in Syracuse as the keynote speaker for student research day at Upstate Medical University.

Also on this week's show: an update on sexually transmitted disease rates and treatments, plus legal issues facing people with chronic conditions.

This week: end-of-life ethics, bullying, pediatric trauma

Sep 8, 2016

Life-and-death decisions were once made exclusively by doctors, but nowadays those matters are largely in the hands of patients. This can create conflict as relatives disagree over how to treat a failing patient. That’s where ethics consultants can help.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

As the baby boomer generation ages, more and more Americans are planning for the end of life. In the Southern Tier, a new home for the terminally ill has been in the works for months, and it's modeling itself after Francis House in Syracuse.

Construction is well underway at Mercy House, in the old St. Casimir's Church in Endicott. Mercy House will be a home for terminally ill people who have six months or less to live. 

Getting the most out of medical directives

Jul 25, 2014

Thinking about the end of life is not something many of us want to do. But today a variety of medical directives exist that can help your family members and health care providers know your wishes ahead of time. This week, Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care" interview Dr. Barron Lerner about what different medical directives do. Dr. Learner is a medical ethicist, author and professor at the New York University School of Medicine.

When illness causes parent-child role reversal

Jan 26, 2014
MTSOfan / Flickr

At the beginning of life, parents generally take care of children. But later in life, many adult children find that they become the ones who must take care of their parents. Whether that transition happens suddenly or slowly over the years, it can be difficult because the roles parents and children have played for decades are reversed.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, discusses some of the things adult children should keep in mind as they become caregivers.

Click Read More to hear our interview with Dr. Wen.