Environment

Ithaca restricts access to Ithaca Falls amid lead concerns

Jun 24, 2015
Samuel Whitehead / WSKG News

 

Ithaca Falls is a popular spot. People come to see the falls, wade in, and fish. It’s there that Fall Creek takes its final plunge before flowing into Cayuga Lake.

But a recent discovery has cut off access to this beloved space. Last week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found something concerning: lead.

Nels Bohn, director of the city of Ithaca’s Urban Renewal Agency, said that early testing is preliminary. He also said that some composite samples “have measurements above 400 parts per million of lead” within 25 feet of the gorge wall.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

A group from Jefferson and Lewis Counties has helped set a new world record... by planting a whole bunch of trees in just one hour.  Groups all over North America joined in the challenge in their communities. More than 200,000 trees were planted in nearly 30 different places across the continent. 

At the Sand Flats State Forest in the Tug Hill, people were racing to get new saplings into the ground.

In this archived broadcast from July 26, 1991, John Weeks talks about how birds and insects are great nesters and how they are the greatest architects. He speaks about mostly birds and how they build their birds nest how they are all unique and different. Every bird and insect has a different taste so depending on the type of bird or insect the nest or "home" is different and Weeks goes into detail about that. 

Abundance at Sunrise

May 27, 2015

In this archived broadcast from  July, 6, 1990 John Weeks talks about the sunrise and how he gets up early to look at the birds. He talks about how the sunrise is the most important part of the day and what he enjoys about it. He narrates his morning and the birds that he seeing such as the sparrows that nest by his home.

In this archived broadcast from June 14, 1991, John Weeks talks about the sounds of nature. He goes into detail about how the sounds of the forest give us an idea about what is going on in nature and in the forest. without the sound of birds, animals and the wind we loose the important of nature. He talks about how it is hard for him to hear the sounds of nature and he talks about how he needs a hearing aid to hear the sounds in the woods.

In this archived broadcast from March 20, 1987, John Weeks talks with John Rodgers who is co founder of the Upstate Bluebird Society. He interviews Rodgers on bluebird boxes and why they are making them. They talk about how important the nest boxes are to the environment and the Bluebirds. He speaks about how not only Bluebird's use these nests but many other birds do as well.

Spring Time Episodes

May 13, 2015

In this archived broadcast from April 29, 1990, John Weeks talks about the coming of spring and how fast it happens. He talks about the different birds of the spring and how spring goes by so fast because of the transition into summer that sometimes people don't see the beauty in it.

Lessons in the Lakes

May 11, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 3, 1984, John Weeks talks about his anniversary trip to Skaneateles  Lake. He says that the lake was so clean and pure. He goes into great detail about the lake and the people and history that surrounds it. He talks about how all of the New York waterways and lakes differ from each other.

In this archived broadcast from May 25, 1990, John Weeks talks about he talks about how the birds of the spring prepare for the summer and how they nest. He also talks about the song of the birds. He goes into detail about a time that he was bird watching and examined certain birds.

Not All Mints are Minty

May 4, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 16, 1990, John Weeks talks about mint plants. He talks about how we use mint in our everyday lives for flavoring. He talks about breaking a mint plant open and smelling the spearmint aroma. He says that hummingbirds are highly attractive to the mint plant and the smell. He also talks about the different type of mint plants and what makes them unique.

In this archived broadcast from April 6, 1990, John Weeks talks about the segue from spring to summer and how beautiful it is. He also talks about the 13 nature photos for every month on the calendar. He talks about how the 1991 calendar will be different than in years past, and why it will be unique

David Sommerstein / NCPR

Wind farms have been popping up in rural areas of Northern New York. Wind energy  doesn't burn fossil fuels or emit greenhouse gases.  But while wind farms  may be a positive step for the environment in one way, they also can kill birds and bats.  Now, the company behind a wind farm in Copenhagen is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to determine how to prevent deaths of these winged creatures before they occur.

In this archived broadcast from March 6, 1987, John Weeks talks about bird watchers and how and why they observe birds. He talks about how a winter bird walk or watch is different than one in the summer and spring because there are different birds and nesting techniques. He also goes into detail on how winter birds are different than

spring and summer birds. He talks about their feeding and nesting techniques.

In this archived broadcast from June, 3, 1988, John Weeks talks about Bees and their connection with flowers. He talks about Bees in central New York and California and what he has experienced. He talks about what trees and plants attract the Bees and explains why.

In this archived broadcast from June 18, 1992, John Weeks talks about the sounds that different birds make and what each sound actually means to that bird and fellow birds around it. He talks about how every bird's sound is unique and what makes them different.

The Sounds of Spring Part.2

Apr 30, 2015

In this archived broadcast from May, 10, 1991, John Weeks is back in Baltimore woods. He talks about how protective screech Owls are and how in the spring they have a reputation for defending their nests. He goes into detail about the birds of spring. He talks about his walk through the woods and all of the things he experienced.

Learning at Rice Creek

Apr 30, 2015

In this archived broadcast from July 17, 1987, John Weeks talks about the three different programs that were being done that day with elementary school kids. He got to sit in and watch what they learned. The kids found certain bugs and plant life at Rice Creek and John weeks explained in detail what they were and how they contribute to the earth and nature.

In this archived broadcast from August 6, 1988, John Weeks talks about a time that someone called him about a Blue Jay but it was a Heron. He talks in detail about the Herons and how they contribute to the environment. He describes what they look like and what their nests look like.

On Crows and Fawns

Apr 29, 2015

In this archived broadcast from June 22, 1990, John Weeks talks about the walks that he has and what he has seen. He says that every walk is different and he never knows what he is going to find. He goes into detail about crows and fawns and what makes them unique. He says that birds are constantly surprising him. He speaks about what he saw on his walk through the Baltimore Woods and what surprised him.

In this archived broadcast from April 25, 1987, John Weeks talks about his experience with crows and great horned owls one day at Rice Creek. He goes into detail about both birds and what makes them unique.

Natural Insect Control

Apr 27, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 10, 1984, John Weeks talks about the art of a bird watcher. He goes into detail about different birds and how they all eat and feed off of different insects. He talks about how birds will change the insects that they eat depending on the season.

In this archived broadcast from May, 2, 1991, John Weeks talks about migration and nesting. He goes into great detail on birds and the nesting time of year. He narrates his walk and pioneer trail that he went on. He talks about Song Sparrows and how they use sound to get the attention of other birds around them. He runs through different birds and the sounds that make them unique.

In this archived broadcast from August 17, 1984, John Weeks talks to the Director of Recreation for the Onondaga County park system. Weeks interviews him and asks him about his job and what is up and coming for the Onondaga County parks.

Spring A Dialogue

Apr 24, 2015

In this archived broadcast from April 19, 1991, John Weeks follows a dialogued format where he talks about how much he loves the spring and how he is not that interested in winter because he is old and looses track of things. He talks about his childhood and an illness in the spring that his mother was going through. He talks about what he used to do during the spring when he was younger and why it is his favorite time of year.

Good Hawk

Apr 24, 2015

In this archived broadcast from May 20,1993, John Weeks talks about the hawk and how its a bird that slips through peoples mind. He talks about his days studying birds at Cornell University. He also talks about the relationship between hunters and hawks.

In this archived broadcast from June 10, 1988, John Weeks talks about how in the beginning of the summer the calico fields start to blossom. Weeks talks in detail about the origin of calico fields. He talks about the various contrasting colors in spring and summer. He talks about the different flowers that blossom throughout the season as well. 

Unplug for Earth Day

Apr 22, 2015
Samuel M. Livingston / Flickr

Some SUNY ESF scientists say a booming world population and over-consumption, are the earth’s biggest enemy.  But they say there are things humans can do on a an individual level that can make a difference in the big picture.

With a world population expected to top eight billion in a decade, professor Chuck Kroll, of the department of environmental resources engineering, looks at all those humans and the resources they uses as the biggest environmental threats out there.

In this archived broadcast from July 12, 1991, John Weeks talks about the Cicero swamp and how the environment and the harvest balance out. He stresses the importance of keeping the environment healthy and he also talks about logging and taking up land.

Talking About Spring

Apr 19, 2015

In this archived broadcast from March 13, 1987, John Weeks talks about the upcoming spring season. He talks about the effects of the melting snow. He also talks about climate and how when the seasons change it effects our environment. He talks about how the changing of seasons affects farmers and land. He also talks about how spring changes with the months.

In this archived broadcast from August 9, 1990, John Weeks talks about how birds and sunflowers interconnect. He also talks about the dynamics of sunflowers and what they provide to our lives. He talks about different type of sunflowers and what makes them unique.

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