Regular exercise in the teen years lays the foundation for a longer, healthier life, says a newly released long-term study.

Exercise physiologist Carol Sames, PhD, director of Upstate’s Vitality Fitness Program, helps explain the massive study of Chinese women on this week’s show. She cites its drawbacks and agrees with the idea that people should be encouraged to establish healthy exercise and other habits when young.

Also on the show: whether dyslexia creates a learning disability, and how a person's job could lead to cancer.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

  A program that started a couple of years ago in Syracuse, continues to try to get more central New Yorkers out for a walk.  

Jennifer Pagan and Barb Procopio of Syracuse love to walk.

"I walk indoors in the winter, but outdoors just to be in the fresh air and the beautiful parks.  And After that miserable winter that we had, it’s nice to be outside," agreed Pagan and Procopio. "Walking is so good for everything."

Cancer and its treatments can leave patients feeling nauseated, tired and deconditioned. But research shows that exercise during treatment can help them feel better and even function better.

“The goal of physical therapy is to assist the patient with cancer maintain their quality of life by managing the physical effects of the disease and/or its treatment,” said Cassi Terpening, who has a doctorate in physical therapy. She explains the most appropriate types of exercises on this week’s show.

Multiple solutions needed to end obesity epidemic

Apr 8, 2015
greggavedon.com / via Flickr


Close to 60 percent of New Yorkers are overweight or obese. This week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced he would take steps to fight the obesity epidemic in the state.

New York state ranks second nationwide for medical expenditures related to obesity issues. One researcher says solutions to the problem should include both public health efforts and individualized treatment.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

New York state's acting health commissioner is touring the state this week, advising New Yorkers to get off the couch and get some exercise.

Acting Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker says the tour is grounded in these statistics from the New York State Department of Health: Just over a quarter of New Yorkers are obese and another 36 percent are overweight. The numbers aren't much better for children. Thirty-two percent of public school students between the ages of six and 12 across the state are either overweigh or obese.

Workout worries for the 'weekend warrior'

Jan 18, 2015
Global Panorama / Flickr

You’re always so busy during the day that when evening comes you’re too tired to exercise. So you decide to wait for the weekend and work out extra hard to make up for it. But is that a good idea?

This week on “Take Care,” health writer Gretchen Reynolds discusses the dangers of being a “weekend warrior.” Reynolds writes for The New York Times “Well Blog” and is the author of the book “The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer.”

People who walk regularly for exercise may notice that their speed declines and they tire more easily as they age. But is that because they are aging? Could that reduction in pace and energy be slowed or reversed by other types of exercise, like running?

Upstate Medical University exercise physiologist Carol Sames explains how running was found to be more beneficial than walking in a study that compared walkers and runners in Boulder, Colorado. She says running is not appropriate for everyone, and she offers some other ways walkers can add intensity to their workouts.

This week: how a short workout really works

Sep 28, 2014

Don't have time to work out? Researchers have developed a workout that blends strength training with cardiovascular exercise – and it takes just 7 minutes.

Upstate exercise physiologist Carol Sames says the workout was created after asking whether the time could be decreased and the intensity increased to still yield benefit.

“That is essentially what this workout is about. It’s about interval training, which has been around for years, but just packaged slightly differently,” Sames said.

This week: the prevalence of depression

Aug 29, 2014

“Like any other form of medical illness or disease, major depressive disorder results in a good deal of suffering, incapacity and, often, vocational disability,” says psychiatrist Ronald Pies, a professor at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse and Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston.

About one in 14 adults in the United States are depressed. That is about 16 million Americans. In addition, some 2 million adolescents from age 12 to 17 deal with depression. Pies says people with depression are at increased risk for cardiovascular disorders, diabetes and suicide.

Making healthy choices for a healthy lifestyle

Aug 24, 2014
Lake Mead NRA Public Affairs / Flickr

It is a familiar occurrence.  You get home from work with plans to go for a run or head to the gym, but you decide that you are too tired and end up watching television instead.  Why is it that you watch television even though you know that exercising would be a much more productive and healthy use of your time?

This week on “Take Care,” B.J. Gallagher discusses the reasons why we do not always do what is best for us and how we can make positive changes to our lifestyles.  Gallagher is a sociologist and author of the book “Why Don’t I Do the Things I Know Are Good for Me?” 

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with B.J. Gallagher.

The Grain Brain diet: adopting a demanding nutrition plan

Jun 29, 2014
Lori Branham / Flickr

It’s breakfast time, and you’re about to dig into a plate of—salmon?

This week on “Take Care,” we present the second installment of our interview with Dr. David Perlmutter, who explains how to transition into his low-carb diet.  Perlmutter is a board-certified neurologist and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition.  He is also the author of Grain Brain: The surprising truth about wheat, carbs, and sugar—your brain’s silent killers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Perlmutter.

Cholesterol: The good, the bad, and the...wine?

Feb 16, 2014
wellcome images / flickr

Cholesterol. It’s something we need, but becomes a problem when there’s too much of it. It’s a buzzword often thrown around in advertisements for both food and medication, and something people watch out for in their diets. But what is cholesterol, and why can it be a problem?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson answers these questions and more. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

Brisk is better

Jan 26, 2014
Asela Jayarathne / Flickr

The National Walkers' Health Study recently conducted the largest known study about walkers. It was administered to 40,000 different walkers, mostly middle age. Some walkers were slow and some were nearly jogging. Gretchen Reynolds joined us to talk about the findings. Reynolds is a health reporter for the New York Times and author of "The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer".

Click Read More to hear our interview with Gretchen Reynolds.

Two of the most common surgeries among people over 65 are knee and hip replacements. Baby boomers in particular are seeking relief because they often don't want joint pain to slow them down.  Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's new weekly health show, "Take Care" spoke with Dr. Seth Greenky, the chairman for orthopedic surgery at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Syracuse, about the causes of joint pain and what to do about it.

Just 20 minutes: The surprising science of exercise

Apr 14, 2013

This week on Take Care, an interview with Gretchen Reynolds, journalist, author and fitness advocate. Her most recent book “The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer” explains that being fit doesn’t have to mean running a marathon. In fact, just getting up and moving around regularly can greatly reduce your risk of dying prematurely.

(click on "Read more" for the podcast of this interview and more information)

It seems like new studies come out all the time that offer evidence for how long, when, or what kind of exercise you should do. But fitness expert Gretchen Reynolds says it may take a lot less exercise than you think to see benefits to your health. The author of "The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer” spoke with Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, the hosts of WRVO's new weekly health show "Take Care."