fish

Mercury in fish a possible risk factor for ALS

Jul 29, 2017
Mobilus In Mobili / Flickr

Many of us eat fish as part of a healthy diet. Full of healthy fat and nutrients, it’s a staple for people around the globe. But there’s another side of fish that’s less positive -- a possible link between mercury in fish and ALS.

Joining us this week on “Take Care” are two researchers of a recent study that found that eating certain types of fish may increase the risk of developing ALS.  The researchers are Dr. Elijah Stommel, a professor of Neurology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College and a neurologist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center; and Angeline Andrew, an assistant professor of neurology at the Geisel School in epidemiology and biostatistics and an experienced molecular epidemiologist.

Courtesy Hannah Ring / Citizens Campaign for the Environment

Local environmental activists are putting pressure on Onondaga County to change advisory signs about eating fish caught in Onondaga Lake.

Everyone agrees the fish in Onondaga Lake are a testament to a legacy of pollution, and shouldn’t be a staple in anyone’s diet -- especially pregnant women and children.

In this archived broadcast from July 3, 1987, John Weeks talks about wetlands and how important they are to the environment. He goes into detail about what a wetland is and how wild life react in wetlands. He also talks about the fish populations within wetlands.

Ashley Hirtzel/WBFO

The Great Lakes Fishery Commission estimates that more than 40 million people in the U.S. and Canada depend on the Great Lakes for food, drinking water and recreation. A state-of-the-art research vessel, called the “Muskie,” is currently making its way through Lake Erie collecting data samples for the U.S. Geological Survey.

Mercury levels among fish caught in the Atlantic Ocean are dropping, but it's not the same case for fish from the Pacific Ocean.