Health

Reporting on health issues

Christopher Brown / Flickr

If you were asked what the best place for your cell phone is, you might say your pocket. But a recent study has shown keeping your cell phone on your person may be connected to certain types of cancer.

This week on “Take Care,” journalist Dina Fine Maron shares the findings of this study. Maron’s article, “Major Cell Phone Radiation Study Reignites Cancer Questions,” appeared in Scientific Americanin May 2016. Maron is an award winning journalist, the health and medicine editor for Scientific American, and is a contributor to the publication's podcasts and Instant Egghead video series.

How to make healthy life changes from tiny habits

Aug 13, 2016
Nathan Rupert / Flickr

When it comes to making a change in our life, such as reducing stress or losing weight, it can seem difficult. But if we broke it down into small steps that eventually turned that change into an everyday routine, it might not seem so scary.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. B.J. Fogg tells us about this new theory he calls “Tiny Habits:” a model he’s created for human behavior change, guided by research and design. Fogg is a psychologist and innovator who directs the persuasive tech lab at Stanford University, is the author of “Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do,” and has been selected by Fortune Magazine as one of the “10 Gurus You Should Know.”

How tiny habits can lead to lasting change

Aug 12, 2016

Change is hard. And if you're trying to make a healthy change -- like losing weight or quitting smoking -- the challenge may seem monumental. This week, WRVO's health and wellness show features an interview with B.J. Fogg, A Stanford University psychologist and innovator. He says the secret to lasting change is developing changes in your behavior, which he calls tiny habits.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

It’s been a long time coming, but the town of Orleans, in Jefferson County, is on its way to fresh drinking water. The state announced this week they will provide the town with $3 million to help build a pipe to bring clean water to homes from Alexandria Bay.

Jefferson County Legislator Phil Reed said he thought he’d never see the day when Orleans, a tiny town between Clayton and Alexandria Bay, would finally get help, 

“Because we kept hearing from people, maybe next year, maybe next year, maybe next year. It was very frustrating to say the least," Reed said.

Gordon Lew / Flickr

This is the time of year health officials recommend families make sure children’s vaccinations are up to date so they can go to school in September. This year, there is one new requirement change in New York state.

The new vaccination rules affect older children, according to Upstate Medical University infectious disease specialist Dr. Joe Domachowske. The required shot is first given before seventh grade, then followed up with a booster, and will protect children from the sometimes deadly form of bacterial meningitis.

Chris Potter / Flickr

You care about your health, but it can be expensive. Between doctor’s visits, co-pays, and prescription medication, the final bill can be more than you expect. But what if there was a way to make it cheaper?

This week on “Take Care,” Matthew Chaiken tells us about his new company Blink Health, and how they’re able to cut out the middle man when it comes to buying prescription drugs at the pharmacy. Chaiken co-founded Blink Health with his brother Geoffrey in 2014, and they launched the company’s website and mobile app this past February.

Mindful eating: Let your body tell you when you're full

Aug 6, 2016
Scott Kidder / Flickr

You may feel you don’t always eat because you’re hungry, but to fulfill other emotions, such as boredom, stress, sadness or anger.

Overeating can often be a result of mindless eating when we’re feeling these emotions, according to this week’s “Take Care” guest, Dr. Lynn Rossy. Rossy is the author of the book "The Mindfulness-Based Eating Solution: Proven Strategies to End Overeating, Satisfy Your Hunger, and Savor Your Life,” and is a licensed clinical psychologist for the wellness program at the University of Missouri. She is also on the board of directors for the Center for Mindful Eating.

As Jody Adams scrolled through Facebook in January, one post stuck with her. It was written from the point of view of an infant seeking someone to donate a kidney to his ailing mother.

A nurse for 12 years and the mother of six children, Adams says the idea of donating one of her healthy kidneys had never crossed her mind -- until she read that post. She didn’t want to imagine a little boy growing up without a mother, especially if she could help. It didn’t matter to her that she did not know the family.

Being mindful of your eating

Aug 5, 2016
Michelle Hurwitz / Flickr

Sometimes physical hunger isn't the only reason we choose to eat. Mindless eating, a topic we explore this week on "Take Care," can bring comfort and mask other issues.

This week on WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Lynn Rossy, a clinical psychologist at the University of Missouri's Wellness Program. Rossy helps people learn to check in with their bodies, recognize when they're full and avoid overeating.

Health insurance premiums likely to go up in New York

Aug 4, 2016
Pictures of Money / Flickr

New York State will soon release the rates it’s approved for premiums for health insurance.

Insurers filed their requests to the state earlier this year for the premiums they want to charge in 2017. In general, they asked for bigger increases than they have in the past.

But bigger increases to premiums are expected across the country. Cynthia Cox, Associate Director of Health Reform and Private Insurance at the Kaiser Family Foundation, said this expected boost is a correction of sorts.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Central New York is home to some new strategies meant to help victims of the heroin and opioid epidemic. The strategies include new kinds of support for families of victims, and for individuals recovering from overdoses.

Onondaga County’s new peer engagement specialist, Maria Sweeney, has started to make connections in central New York emergency rooms, to help individuals recovering from a drug abuse issue. She says often there is no one to offer support for recovery, once an addict is released from the hospital.

Some find art more therapeutic than words

Jul 30, 2016
David Goehring / Flickr

Even if your version of drawing is simple stick figures, you may find yourself feeling relaxed when you doodle on papers or color. Creating art has even been proven to have a therapeutic value in the medical world.

The term art therapy was coined in the 1940s, and today is applied in a variety of settings to aid both children and adults in expressing and releasing trauma. This week on “Take Care,” international art therapy expert, Cathy Malchiodi gives us an insight to art therapy and how it works. Malchiodi is a research psychologist, art therapist, and clinical counselor. She is also the founder and director of the Trauma-Informed Practices and Expressive Arts Therapy Institute, and is the president of Art Therapy Without Borders.

Gallstones; why they form and how they can be prevented

Jul 30, 2016
Hey Paul Studios / Flickr

It’s a small organ on the right side of the body behind the liver. It’s three inches long, shaped like a pear and it can cause us severe pain if our cholesterol builds up -- but we can live without it. Can you guess what it is? 

The gallbladder is the organ that fits this description. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Salam Zakko enlightens us on what this organ does and why it's sometimes removed. Zakko is a gastroenterologist and the executive director at Connecticut Gastroenterology Institute and Clinical Research Foundation at Bristol Hospital. He is also a clinical professor in medicine at the University of Connecticut.

Polio epidemics, which paralyzed and killed children and terrified their parents before Dr. Jonas Salk developed a vaccine, are brought to life by a survivor of a 1953 outbreak.

Janice Flood Nichols was a DeWitt first-grader in 1953 when she and seven classmates were stricken with polio during the epidemic. Three of them, including her twin brother, died. Nichols recovered. The next year, she took part in testing the vaccine developed by Salk. Today she advocates for vaccination against polio and other diseases.

How art therapy can help some deal with trauma

Jul 29, 2016
Jessica Wilson / Flickr

The therapeutic value of art has long been recognized. Today art therapy is used to treat adults and children with a variety of mental health issues. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with research psychologist and art therapist Cathy Malchiodi about how art therapy is used to help patients.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

The number of heroin and opioid overdoses continues to rise in central New York. According to the latest figures from the Onondaga County Medical Examiner’s Office, there have been 30 overdose deaths to date in 2016, compared with 52 all of last year.  The opioid epidemic is also starting to affect some of the agencies that deal with people addicted to heroin.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

New York State Police have announced that over the past few days they have seized 100 packets of what they suspect are synthetic drugs and made five arrests at two convenience stores in Syracuse and one in Binghamton. The suspects will face misdemeanor charges.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state has a different strategy this year to combat the drugs, which comes with a new economic risk. Store owners found guilty of selling synthetic drugs can lose their lottery license, liquor license, and the store itself could be shutdown.  

Staying safe when lightning strikes

Jul 23, 2016
Andreas Øverland / Flickr

When we think of something with low odds, like winning the lottery, we might compare it to getting struck by lightning. However, the chances of getting struck by lightning may be higher than you think.

There is actually a one-in-12,000 chance this could happen in your lifetime, according to the National Weather Service. This week on “Take Care,” lightning expert John Jensenius tells us what we need to know about lightning and how to stay safe when it strikes. Jensenius is a meteorologist and lightning safety specialist with the National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Tim Sandle / Flickr

Donating blood and organs, if possible, is encouraged in the medical world to save lives. But recently, medical professionals may also be looking for a new type of donor—fecal.

Fecal transplantation dates back to 4th century China, according to the Fecal Transplant Foundation, and is a recent, but often effective, treatment for a specific type of colitis. To explain fecal transplantation this week on “Take Care,” is Dr. Rajeev Jain. Jain is a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, the chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas, and is a clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Lightning can strike and be dangerous

Jul 22, 2016
Nathan Vaughn / Flickr

Summertime in many parts of the world means thunderstorms. And with thunder comes the danger of lightning. While being struck by lightning is often thought to be rare, it can happen, and can cause permanent injury or death. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with John Jensenius, a meteorologist and lightning safety specialist with the National Weather Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

W-18, a new synthetic opioid, may be on the scene in central and northern New York. ACR Health prevention director Erin Bortel said several overdose deaths in the North Country have raised suspicions.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald spoke at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School to students yesterday giving advice on leadership and sharing his experiences coming into the VA. Some of the recent changes implemented at the VA are in response to long wait times for medical care and are meant to improve veterans’ experiences.

This week: E-cigarettes, opiates and digestive diseases

Jul 19, 2016

Electronic cigarettes, promoted as producing water vapor instead of smoke, actually produce an aerosol with tiny particles that could cause lung problems, according to Theresa Hankin, a respiratory therapist at the Upstate Cancer Center.

The tobacco-derived liquid in e-cigarettes and related devices contains highly addictive nicotine and traces of elements like heavy metals, Hankin notes. Although some tout the devices as a way to quit smoking, many people end up using both kinds of cigarettes.

Suffering economy causes stress in college graduates

Jul 16, 2016
Shilad Sen / Flickr

For generations kids have been told that if they work hard in school, they’ll get a good job. But this doesn’t seem to be so simple for the millennial generation, as there just aren’t enough jobs in the current economy to go around.

Little berries are big super food

Jul 16, 2016
Min Liu / Flickr

Whether you buy them fresh or frozen, pick them off the bush or grow them yourself, berries are one of the best foods to have in the house. They’re tasty and, nutrition-wise, pack a big punch for such a small food.

Mild cognitive impairment is when some brain processes are not functioning the way they should at one’s age. This state, short of full-on dementia and not serious enough to interfere with daily life, might involve problems with memory, language use, reasoning, or visual and spatial abilities, says Upstate University Hospital neurologist Amy Sanders, who runs a clinic that tests for the condition at the hospital.

Sanders touches on screening methods, the role of memory, the relationship to dementia and tips to keep the aging brain healthy on this week’s show.

Rachel.Adams / Flickr

The millennial generation is experiencing high levels of stress over work and career. Large student loans, difficulty finding a job after college and the new economy are causing mental health issues for a growing number of younger people. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Vinita Mehta, a clinical psychologist and journalist about this increase in anxiety among millennials.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Hutchings Psychiatric Center, the first integrated mental health, primary care clinic at a state psychiatric hospital, has opened in Syracuse. The clinic is also open to the general community according to State Mental Health Commissioner Ann Sullivan.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The state health department is prepared, if a case of the Zika virus develops in New York state. While officials want to be ready for the worst, they’re finding some positives in the reaction to the latest insect driven disease, that at its worst, causes birth defects in newborns.

Exercise intensity may affect your mood

Jul 9, 2016
eltpics / Flickr

For many years research has proven just how much daily exercise can improve our overall health. But even with this information, some of us still dread exercise and can’t get past the idea of the sweating, aching, and tiredness it can make us feel.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Paddy Ekkekakis explains why some of us may feel this way toward exercise more than others. Ekkekakis is a professor at Iowa State University and has been researching pleasure and displeasure responses resulting from exercise and physical activity for the past 25 years. His current focus is on the psycho-biological mechanism of the sense of fatigue, and reasons for avoiding physical activity.

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