Health

Reporting on health issues

Naloxone, a medication that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, can be purchased over the counter from pharmacies in New York and several other states, says Willie Eggleston, a clinical toxicologist and doctor of pharmacy from the Upstate New York Poison Center.

He explains how to administer naloxone, which is sold under the brand name Narcan, and how the medication works. He also tells about the Good Samaritan Law designed to protect people who are trying to help.

NYS Office for People with Developmental Disabilities

Families with disabled children and adults have some decisions to make in the coming weeks. New York State is replacing the Medicaid Service Coordination Program, that’s served this population for decades, with one called Health Home Care Management

Pain is the human body's alarm system, but not every alarm can be traced to an injury that requires treatment. Back pain is one example. It's the kind of problem almost everyone will face at some point. But when should you be concerned?

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Research has prompted some new and unusual memory care at one central New York day center for the elderly. 

It looks like small yellow dog with a bright red collar. It wags its tail and barks like a dog, and that’s enough for it to be a soothing presence to one of the clients at a PACE CNY Day Center in East Syracuse.

This puppy is part of what PACE CNY calls a memory care kit. It includes an animatronic cat as well as the dog, a realistic looking baby, and other soothing items like aromatherapy and the soft pink lights of an LED Cherry Tree.

North Devon Council / Flickr

This time on "Take Care," how technology meets cleanliness when it comes to fighting the flu with light and electrostatic sprayers. Plus, we'll talk to the lead on a trial out of Rochester testing a universal flu vaccine.

In the wake of another fatal flu season in the U.S., national nonprofit Families Fighting Flu is spreading awareness about influenza and the vaccine that can prevent its fatal effects. Serese Marotta, chief operating officer, joined the organization in 2010 and has fully supported the group’s purpose ever since.

Government of Prince Edward Island/Flickr

As the current fatal flu season winds down, how to handle the next is on many public health officials’ minds.

Pediatrician Dr. Howard Markel is a social and cultural historian of medicine, public health and epidemics and director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the University of Michigan. He spoke with "Take Care" to discuss his research and how it can be used to prevent future flu outbreaks as bad as this season’s.

Influenza: Facts, myths and prevention

Mar 24, 2018
Daniel Paquet / Flickr

As we set out to examine influenza on "Take Care," we wanted to start out with the basics. Flu is one of those illnesses that carries with it a lot of baggage in the form of myths and tall tales. After all, hasn't anyone ever told you that you can get the flu from the vaccine? (You can't.)

Dr. Angela Campbell, medical officer in the influenza division of the CDC, joined us to share her insight into this year's flu virus and how to prevent contracting it.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

The worst flu season in nearly a decade has taken a toll on the nation's hospitals. The facilities have been on the front lines, dealing with a flood of patients that in some areas has reached crisis levels. In New Jersey and Alabama, some hospitals have needed triage tents just to process the surge of patients.

That hasn't been the case in Syracuse, but the rise in flu cases has swamped some local emergency departments, causing a ripple effect.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO Public Media

Medical professionals at Upstate University Hospital are urging the New York State Assembly to pass legislation that would require skiers and snowboarders under the age of 14 to wear helmets. Experts say injuries on the slopes can be more severe than accidents on bicycles.

Upstate Pediatric Trauma Medical Director Kim Wallenstein said every year, the trauma center sees about 10-20 children admitted following an accident from snow sports, and many more are seen as outpatients for things like concussions.

Many children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder will go on to become adults with ADHD, and some adults with the disorder are not diagnosed until adulthood.

Professor Stephen Faraone discusses how the symptoms in children differ from those seen in adults. He also addresses diagnosis and treatment options. Faraone is a distinguished professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and a professor of neuroscience and physiology at Upstate and recommends ADHD resources for health care providers and the public.

Courtesy Brett Truett

This month is the deadline for property owners in downtown Utica to accept their purchase offers from the Mohawk Valley Health System (MVHS) as the company clears the way for its new hospital. One of those buildings has been sold, but not to MVHS.

Dino Babers knew he wanted to be a coach from the time he was 6 years old, even before he found his sport.

Today as head football coach at Syracuse University, Babers motivates student athletes. He talks about what that's like, as well as the training regimen for SU football players and how non-athletes can make fitness a part of their lives, on this week’s “HealthLink on Air.”

He also shares his favorite sports movies: "The Natural," "Field of Dreams" and "Remember the Titans."

Also this week: a program that helps children overcome a variety of feeding disorders.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Oswego County's first social adult day care program is offering families a safe and engaging place to take their relatives who are elderly or suffer from a functional impairment like Alzheimer's. 

St. Luke's Cornerstone Club in Fulton considers itself somewhere between a senior center and a nursing home. Families can drop off their loved ones during the week when they go to work or run errands while their loved ones socialize, play games and eat lunch - all under the supervision of health care professionals.

Sudipto Sarkar / Flickr

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state’s adult smoking rate inched to its lowest recorded level in the latest numbers from state health officials.

The administration of Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday that 14.2 percent of adults were smokers in 2016, compared to 14.5 the year before.

In the ongoing debate over a proposed waste to energy facility at the Seneca Army Depot, a group of residents and business owners who are opposed to the project traveled to Albany Tuesday to call on Governor Andrew Cuomo to reject it.

The facility, proposed by Rochester-based Circular enerG, would produce electricity by burning up to 2,600 tons of trash each day.

A number of residents, neighboring towns, and elected officials have come out against the project.

E-cigarettes, hemorrhoids, new blood cancer treatments

Feb 16, 2018

A new report on the health effects of electronic cigarettes says that while e-cigarettes may be less harmful than conventional cigarettes, they're not harmless -- and vaping among youth increases the risk that they will transition to smoking traditional cigarettes.

Providing an update on e-cigarette trends are administrative director Michele Caliva and public education coordinator Lee Livermore from the Upstate New York Poison Center.

People with the irregular heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation have an increased risk of blood clots, which can lead to a stroke.

Most blood clots in these patients form in a small pocket of the heart, explain invasive cardiac electrophysiologist Jamal Ahmed and nurse Scott Davis, who both work in the Upstate Heart and Vascular Center. Davis is the Watchman procedure coordinator, which refers to the procedure now offered to prevent clots from escaping that pocket, known as the left atrial appendage.

health.ny.gov

The number of people testing positive for the flu this winter has been rising rapidly in New York State and central New York. According to the state health department, more than 11,000 thousand cases of the flu were confirmed in the state during the week ending January 27, a 50 percent increase from the week before. 

Smile Train

This statement, and others, dot the website of Smile Train -- a charitable organization treating cleft lip and cleft palate in the developing world. These conditions can cause complications in speech, eating and even breathing.

eSight Eyewear

It’s not easy to keep up with the latest in health and wellness. Each day, new studies, research and developments in health make it difficult to pick out the most important information for you.

We’ll be sharing a few of the latest developments in health at the end of each episode of “Take Care” this year. As the year goes on, we may even revisit some earlier news to see where things stand months later.

Today we’re covering a couple of interesting ways that health is intersecting technology and the first is quite a breakthrough.

Is corporate America driving your charitable donations?

Feb 4, 2018
audreyjm529 / Flickr

Not all pink ribbons are created equal, according to the "Take Care" guest we're speaking to today.

Dr. Mara Einstein is a researcher, author and professor at Queens College, CUNY, who dissects the effects of marketing on society and on ourselves. Her latest book is “Black Ops Advertising: Native Ads, Content Marketing and the Covert World of the Digital Sell.”

A blood donor on his incredible commitment

Feb 3, 2018
Red Cross

For decades, the Red Cross has been encouraging people to give blood, especially during times of hardship. When Jerry Ball was in his teens, he heard that call and he’s been giving ever since. Jerry has donated blood over 200 times -- 268 times, to be exact.

“You can donate whole blood every 56 days, so I just sign up every 56 days,” Jerry says.

When Jerry was growing up, it was the 1970s. There was a war going on. The need was there. That’s why he started his commitment to donating.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Resources for families with young children can be scarce, from diapers to milk. Often, there is no government assistance to help struggling families with these necessities. But there are grassroots organizations that step up at the local level to help new families. 

Allison Brooks of the Salvation Army in Syracuse said the need for diapers hit home for her a few years ago when she was working at a food pantry.

"HealthLink on Air" brings you a special show this week for World Cancer Day.

A century ago, people diagnosed with lung cancer had few options. Surgery meant cutting open the patient's chest and removing an entire lung.

While sometimes that type of procedure is still necessary today, surgeons are much more likely to operate through tiny incisions to remove just a lobe from the lung or a piece of a lobe.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Community health centers in central New York and across the country have been operating without long-term funding from the federal government since September. Sen. Charles Schumer said he is fighting to fully renew the program.

Credit USACE Europe District / via Flickr

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Gov. Andrew Cuomo has taken steps to make it easier for New Yorkers to get the influenza vaccine as the flu epidemic continues to spread across the state.

The Democrat signed an executive order Thursday that allows pharmacists to administer flu vaccines to people ages two to 18. The order suspends a state law that limits the authority of pharmacists to administer vaccines to anyone under age 18.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

A new study shows that doctors may have more time than previously thought to successfully treat someone who has had a stroke. Doctors at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse see this as a new era in stroke treatment.

During a stroke, brain cells that are cut off from blood flow will ultimately die, which is why physicians urge anyone with stroke symptoms to get treatment within six hours, to effectively remove a stroke-causing blood clot. 

This week: It's not too late to get a flu shot

Jan 25, 2018

With widespread flu activity reported across the United States, Upstate Medical University pediatric infectious disease expert, Dr. Jana Shaw reminds central New Yorkers that it's not too late to get vaccinated.

She says this year's influenza vaccine offers some protection against the H3N2 strain, which is circulating this season. Shaw offers advice about treatment for flu symptoms and when to seek care at a hospital.

Also on this week’s show: an explanation of palliative care, and more on chest surgery done with tiny incisions and robotic assistance.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

New statewide rules for distribution of Naloxone is affecting one central New York agency that trains people to use the drug, also known as Narcan.

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