Health

Reporting on health issues

No 'gut health,' no glory

3 hours ago

The idea of healthy and unhealthy bacteria in the digestive tract has been around for a while. But lately the balance between the two has become popularly referred to "gut health." what does that mean and how does that affect your overall health? This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Rajeev Jain, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas, to explain why we should care about what's going on in our gut.

Medical Schools in New York state are asking the legislature to include $50 million for faculty development in the state budget. University leadership calls the  New York State Office of Science, Technology and Academic Research (NYSTAR) Faculty Development Program an investment needed to grow programs that will attract high-profile entrepreneurial biomedical researchers.

quinn.anya / Flickr

Only four percent of people experience chronic migraines. But all migraine sufferers can have life-long recurrences, often beginning at puberty and affecting those between 35 and 45 years old.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mark Green talks about what causes migraines and how to manage them. Green is the director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. 

Oliver Symens / Flickr

Keeping track of health information for children and the elderly has always been a complicated task. Care for these groups has slowly moved to the Internet to make their personal information easier to manage and access by their loved ones. But does that convenience endanger the privacy of their information at all?

This week on “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk to Jonathan Schwartz about the benefits of using a new website to manage loved ones’ health information. Schwartz is the co-founder and chief executive officer of CareZone, an online service that enables families to organize care of their relatives.

The basics of migraine, chronic or not

Mar 15, 2015

Migraines are painful, they come on suddenly and they're more common than you think. But there are ways to manage triggers and treat the condition effectively.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mark Green talks about what causes migraines and how to manage them. Green is the director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Creating a Carezone of health information

Mar 13, 2015

  Managing personal information is a constant problem in the digital age. And managing health information for yourself or a loved one is especially hard because it can be sensitive. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the former CEO of Sun Microsystems Jonathan Schwartz. He founded the website CareZone, which provides a safe place to store medical history and share it with family members.

Lorraine  Rapp: Why is there a need to manage family care giving on line?

People with Type 1 diabetes would not have to check their blood sugar levels 12 times a day or worry about wild fluctuations while they slept if an experimental bionic pancreas works as designed, says Dr. Ruth Weinstock, medical director of Upstate Medical University's Joslin Diabetes Center.

"It's not a cure, but it's definitely a step forward," Dr. Weinstock says.

This week, how the artificial pancreas works.

Senate Democrats / Flickr

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is teaming up with an unlikely group of colleagues to push for more federal support of medical marijuana.

Gillibrand is one of three senators introducing a bill that would scale back federal enforcement of marijuana laws in states that have legalized medicinal or recreational pot.

She is co-sponsoring the bill with a fellow Democrat from New Jersey, Sen. Corey Booker, and Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul. They introduced the legislation Tuesday at a press conference in Washington.

Eddie Codel / Flickr

Right now, wearable health technology is all the rage, with many people tracking things like their steps, activity levels and body movements. But soon these devices could used not just for fitness but as medical tools that could change how illnesses are diagnosed and treated.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Michael Blum talks about wearable health technology. Blum is a cardiologist and clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and heads up the university’s Center for Digital Health Innovation as associate vice chancellor for informatics.

Facing North East / Flickr

Wrinkles can be one of the more irritating changes that come with aging. But where do they come from and why do some people have more or less than others?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber explains various methods to prevent wrinkles and how to treat them once they start. Graber is the director of the Boston University Cosmetic and Laser Center. She is also an assistant professor of dermatology and the associate residency training director at the Boston University School of Medicine.

With sales through the roof and nearly immediate feedback, fitness trackers have dominated the health and wellness market for some time now. Step by step, calorie by calorie, fitness trackers are just the tip of the wearable health technology iceberg.

This week on "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Dr. Michael Blum about the wearable health technology of today and the future. Blum is a cardiologist and clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and heads up the Center for Digital Health Innovation at the university.

This week: miscarriage, HIV prevention and healthy weight

Mar 5, 2015

Though miscarriages can often go unnoticed, they are tremendous losses to the mothers who experience them. Certified nurse midwife Kathleen Dermady explains the symptoms of miscarriage, and Dr. Shawky Badawy goes over the causes.

"Sometimes they have the feeling of blaming themselves," Badawy says of the mothers, "but they are not to blame."

Also this week: how to obtain the prescription drug that can prevent the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS -- plus, nutrition and healthy weight.

sandstep / Flickr

How we eat has a lot to do with our environment. However, there are tricks we can utilize to improve our overall quality of eating.

This week on “Take Care,” Brian Wansink talks about redesigning our lives and our eating habits. Wansink directs the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab and is the author of “Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life.”

Light from electronic devices may keep you up at night

Mar 1, 2015
Junnn / Flickr

Reading is a common activity before bed. A lot of people like to cuddle up with a book or magazine before they turn in for the night. In the 21st century, cell phones and tablets have been added to that list of materials. Though reading is often meant to help us fall asleep, the light emitted from reading devices can actually keep us awake.

This week on “Take Care,” Lois E. Krahn discusses why it is these light emissions make people toss and turn. Krahn is a psychiatrist and sleep expert at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Let there be no light before bed

Feb 27, 2015

If reading in bed is something you've always done, you may want to think twice about using your smartphone or tablet for your nighttime reading. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's weekly health and wellness show, hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Lois Krahn, a psychiatrist with the Sleep Disorders Clinic at Mayo Clinic Arizona, about how too much screen time could be disturbing your sleep.

Michelle Faust / WXXI News

This is the latest installment in our ongoing series on the health risks of nursing.

Emily Roth sits in a café after a long weekend shift. The 27-year-old obstetrics nurse eats a sandwich and gushes about her 15-month-old daughter. Her smile puffs her cheeks up, lifting her brown rectangular-framed glasses away from her face.

Roth has been a nurse for three years and she loves her job, but she hasn’t always felt that way.

"I was going home pretty stressed out on a regular basis. I would go home and cry to my husband sometimes," she said.

This week on HealthLink on Air: Dr. Scott Van Valkenburg discusses common foot problems -- plus, discussion on hot flashes and heart disease in women.

Also on the show, central New Yorkers have an opportunity to participate in a study designed to help find a vaccine for dengue fever, a mosquito-born disease that affects many parts of the developing world and parts of the United States.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

New York state is among the bottom in the nation for residents signed up to be organ donors. Only about a quarter of New Yorkers have consented to being organ donors, according to the Finger Lakes Donor Recovery Network.

That ranks the state 49th in the country. But it has the third highest need for organs.

The low statistic has prompted a new advocacy campaign, hoping to improve those numbers, called Pass Life On.

nystateofhealth.ny.gov

 

The deadline to file your tax return is just under two months away. As many Americans file, they’re finding there are more questions about health insurance on the annual tax forms than ever before based on changes in place because of the Affordable Care Act.
 

In New York, and several other states, people who find they owe a penalty on their 2014 tax return will now have a special enrollment period to sign up for health coverage.

comedy_nose / Flickr

  The final number of New Yorkers who signed up for health insurance through the state exchange this year tops a half a million.

New York State of Health Marketplace is claiming more than 564 thousand new enrollees for 2015. Add that to last year’s numbers and more than 2.1 million people have used the state exchange for health insurance in the first 2 years of the Affordable Care Act.

Donna Frescatore is the Executive Director of the state marketplace. She’s says a close to 90 percent renewal rate for people with private health plans points to stability.

Nazareth College

 

It all began with one Gorbel employee, says President Brian Reh, who was going through physical therapy with her daughter.

"The idea came originally from one of our employees who had experienced first-hand how tough it was to go through gait rehabilitation with the current lack of technology," Reh says. "We had a lot of great things we were doing in the industrial technology sector, and she came forward and said, What if we could apply this to the health field?"

TEDx University of Nevada / Flickr

Public health” is a phrase that can be heard seemingly nonstop whenever there is a health scare or disease outbreak. The current measles outbreak is an example of this -- a public health issue that makes headlines for days, weeks or months at a time.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Leana Wen discusses that public health is actually an everyday affair -- one that needs to receive more attention -- to better prevent and resolve such outbreaks. Wen is a Harvard-educated emergency physician, the Baltimore City health commissioner and co-author of the book “When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests.”

How adjustments in diet can reduce inflammation

Feb 22, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

Inflammation can be a reaction to an injury or infection where the body reddens and swells. It’s sometimes painful and can also be a sign that the body is ready to begin the healing process. But, chronic inflammation is a cause for concern and even has ties to heart disease.

This week on “Take Care,” health expert Johannah Sakimura discusses foods that are high in anti-inflammatory compounds. Sakimura writes the Nutrition Sleuth column at Everyday Health. She has a master’s degree in nutrition from the Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition.

Office of Emergency and Public Health Preparedness / Flickr

After the recent measles outbreak, citizens, medical professionals, advocacy groups and government entities were all talking about "public health." But public health is an ongoing issue -- one that requires more attention. That's according to Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City's health commissioner. This week on "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Wen about the importance of public health.

This week: how to feed a picky eater and more

Feb 19, 2015

A parent's job is to put healthy foods on their children’s plates. After that "you need to back up and let the child choose what they are going to eat," according to Roseanne Jones.

Jones, a registered dietitian, says if a child doesn't want to eat something in particular, don't force it. This week, many more tips and advice for parents whose children are picky eaters.

Also on this week’s show: heart disease in women, and polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Trial could lead to an oral vaccine against HIV

Feb 19, 2015
Mike Blyth / Flickr

 

University of Rochester Medical Center researchers in Rochester are looking for healthy adults for a trial that could lead to an oral vaccine against HIV infection.

The vaccine under investigation comes in pill form.

“Our goal is to eradicate it from the world, much like we've almost done with polio and have done with small pox,” said Doctor Michael Keefer, director of the University’s HIV Vaccine Trials Unit.

  It’s made of live adenovirus -- a protein that creates an immune response against HIV.

Mercy Health / Flickr

  The deadline to enroll for coverage through the state’s health insurance plan was Sunday. New Yorkers who started applications before the cutoff still have until the end of the month to finish them.
 

But state health officials are also considering adding a special enrollment period for people who have not yet filed their 2014 tax return. Consumer advocacy groups are asking for just that as many Americans file returns and see that they may owe money on their federal taxes.

Vernon Dutton / Flickr

 

The American Nurses Association reports 8 out of 10 nurses say they frequently work with joint or back pain. The nursing profession has the highest rate of on-the-job injuries of any other in the country. According to many the solution to both problems: more nurses on staff at hospitals.

"The nurses, in many ways, are the last line of defense against harm to patients," John James, founder of Patient Safety America. His organization campaigns to lower the number of injuries to patients in the hospital.

The dangers of having a sweet tooth

Feb 15, 2015
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Sugar is in a lot of the foods you consume every day, but not all sugar is created equal. Whether it’s refined, naturally occurring, or added – sugar should be eaten sparingly, according to this week’s guest, because addiction to sugar is very real and very possible. And it’s not just the addition to sugar that’s a problem, it’s the damage it can do to your body.

This week on “Take Care,” James DiNicolantonio explains what causes sugar addiction and helps us differentiate healthy and harmful sugars. DiNicolantonio is a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri.

There’s fungus among us and a pedicure won’t fix it

Feb 15, 2015
jima / Flickr

Fungus of the nail, while virtually painless, can often stick out like a sore thumb. Embarrassing discoloration isn’t the only downside of fungus -- if left untreated, that fungus can spread and destroy the nail.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Dana Stern discusses how fungal infections are formed and how to treat them. Stern is a dermatologist, nail specialist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. 

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