Health

Reporting on health issues

Is the brain connected to the gut?

12 hours ago

In recent years, medical researchers have been discovering more about the link between gut health and overall health. This week's on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," neurologist and author Dr. David Perlmutter talks about the idea that microbes in the gut could affect neurological conditions. Dr. Perlmutter writes about explores this connection in his book “Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain – For Life.”  

More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Sunday evening at 6:30 p.m.

Yale Rosen / Flickr

Lung cancer is considered the leading cause of cancer deaths among both men and women. How can it be prevented and who is more likely to get it?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Martin Edelman talks about what can cause lung cancer and who can develop it. Edelman is head of the Solid Tumor Oncology Department at the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Is Facebook making us sad?

Jun 21, 2015
TSEVIS / Flickr

Facebook and the world of social media has given the average person easy access to friends, family and even strangers’ lives with the click of a button or swipe of the thumb. But does having that access make our lives sadder?

This week on “Take Care,” Mai-Ly Nguyen Steers addresses the surprising link between Facebook and depression. Steers is a social psychologist at the University of Houston. Her study, "Seeing Everyone Else's Highlight Reels: How Facebook Usage is Linked to Depressive Symptoms," was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Nurse practitioner Anthony Cerminaro, who specializes in hematology and oncology, writes thrillers in his spare time. One of his characters is a doctor who graduated from Upstate Medical University in Syracuse.

Cerminaro joins us to talk about his books, "The Ten Knife Murders" and "Bonding Over Bullets" on this week’s show.

Also on this week's show: how multidisciplinary care helps breast cancer patients, plus kidney transplants.

Facebook, social comparison and depression

Jun 19, 2015
melenita / Flickr

Americans are spending more and more time on social media. But that can lead to an unexpected impact on the mental health of social media users. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "take care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview University of Houston social psychologist Mai-Ly Nguyen Steers about her research into the links between Facebook and depression. Steers’ study "Seeing Everyone Else's Highlight Reels: How Facebook Usage is Linked to Depressive Symptoms," was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Diabetes: Symptoms, signs and causes

Jun 14, 2015
Neeta Lind / Flickr

Diabetes has reached epidemic levels, and in fact is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, but many people don't know exactly what it is, beyond the fact that is has something to do with sugar levels.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Nathan discusses diabetes, how it’s caused and what symptoms to check for if you’ve developed it. Nathan is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the General Clinical Research Center and of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.  

Food trucks: Consider this on-the-go cuisine a go

Jun 14, 2015
gwen / Flickr

Food trucks, while mobile, have a foothold in many urban areas. And they’re not just providing American food staples – your classic grilled cheese or hot dog. Some of these trucks are quite near gourmet, specializing in locally-sourced food or a particular culture’s cuisine. But are they safe? Is the food prepared in the truck? Do food trucks follow the same regulations as regular restaurants?

This week on “Take Care,” we speak to Richard Myrick about food truck safety. Myrick is an expert in the field, the founder of Mobile-Cuisine.com (the online trade magazine of the mobile food industry) and the author of the book “Running a Food Truck for Dummies.”

Why food trucks may be safer than you think

Jun 12, 2015
daryl_mitchell / Flickr

Food trucks have made a name for themselves in many communities and even on national television. Sometimes they offer food made only from local ingredients, specialty items or even gourmet dishes. And if there's a long line, you know it's good! But is it safe? What kind of regulations do these mobile restaurants and kitchens adhere to?

This week on Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Richard Myrick. Myrick is one of the foremost leaders in the field and author of the book "Running a Food Truck for Dummies."

James Abbott, Thomas Campbell and James Rosenberg, three former chief executives of Syracuse's public hospital, describe the challenges they faced from the 1950s to the 1990s on this week’s show. 

They helped shape health care as it underwent a revolution in the 20th century, including new technologies and quicker, less invasive surgeries. Despite all the changes, Abbott, Campbell and Rosenberg believe the fundamental task of hospitals hasn’t changed -- keeping the patients comfortable and treating them with humanity.

.jocelyn. / Flickr

It sometimes can be more difficult for a smoker to quit the habit if they’re in chronic pain. A Syracuse University graduate student has won a federal grant to figure out a way to change that.

There can be a vicious circle when it comes to pain and smoking according to SU graduate student Emily Zale.

"Smokers are more likely to develop chronic pain and they may experience worse pain and have more disability that goes along with their pain, and in turn the pain may actually motivate continued smoking,” Zale says. “And may actually be a barrier in quitting.” 

Destoinie Cormier / Save RCWP Facebook page

State Sen. Patty Ritchie has secured 185 thousand dollars in funding to treat troops and veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Part of the money will go towards a program at Alexandria Bay’s River Hospital that treats Fort Drum soldiers.

The announcement comes just days after the hospital was given the ok to continue the program.

The River Hospital’s Community Wellness program was in danger of shutting its doors last month. The Army had decided to move all PTSD treatment programs back onto bases across the country.

  Waiting lists for treatment of opioid addiction continue to grow in central New York. That’s why local addiction experts are hoping proposed federal legislation that could help the situation becomes law.  

Monika Taylor, director of behavioral health services at Crouse Hospital in Syracuse says Buprenorphine, also known as Suboxone, can be key to someone getting off their addiction to opioids -- heroin or prescription painkillers.

Preventing falls as you get older: exercise is the key

Jun 7, 2015
Rosie O'Beirne / Flickr

Many older people have a great fear of falling – and with good reason. When a senior citizen falls, the likelihood of serious injury is far greater than when a younger person does. And for the elderly, falls can be disabling and even lead to death.

This week on “Take Care,” we interview Dr. Laurence Z. Rubenstein, professor and chairman of the Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Rubenstein has researched and worked extensively on the development of interventions to prevent falls in older adults.

Vienze Ziction / Flickr

Not only do sunglasses reduce glare while we’re driving and help us to see more comfortably when we’re outside, but they also help to reduce the risk of eye damage.

This week on “Take Care,” professor of ophthalmology at the University of California Davis Medical School and spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Dr. Ivan Schwab, explains why sunglasses can prevent damage to the eyes and what damage the sun can cause.

People seeking an energy boost are putting themselves at risk using a cheap powdered caffeine that’s easy to purchase online. A pharmacist with the Upstate New York Poison Center joins us to explain.

One teaspoon of powdered caffeine is as powerful as 25 cups of coffee, making it easy to overdose. The drug can cause serious heart arrhythmias and/or seizures, both of which may lead to death.

Also this week: syphilis and other sexually-transmitted diseases, plus the unmet promises of primary health care reform.

What seniors can do to help prevent falls

Jun 5, 2015

When younger people fall down, it may lead to some bumps and bruises. But for senior citizens, falls are much more likely to be life changing -- leading to broken hips or disability. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. Laurence Rubenstein, chairman of the Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine about the dangers of falls for the elderly and how to prevent them.

baasiilb15 / Flickr

Health insurance companies are asking New York state to approve increases in 2016 premium costs.

If this year’s increase serves as a guide, 18 New York insurance companies will not be allowed to raise their premium rates the full 13.5 percent they’re requesting for 2016.

Last year, the state Department of Financial Services allowed plans on the individual insurance market to go up an average 5.7 percent, less than half the requested increase of nearly 14 percent.

St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center / Facebook

St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center will be offering pasteurized donor human milk for premature infants.  

St. Joseph’s will become one of 12 hospitals in New York state that will offer donor’s milk, from a Boston-based milk bank in its Level III neonatal intensive care unit.  

Pediatrics chairman Dr. Larry Consenstein says the milk would be used in cases where a mother’s milk is not available for a premature infant. He says studies show that feeding formula to a premature baby can cause severe complications, especially infections in the digestive tract.

Chris and Jenni / Flickr

Excellus BlueCross BlueShield is trying to discourage mothers from early elective deliveries. The insurance company is sending out information to doctors and health care facilities, warning about problems that can come from delivering babies early.

No yolks about it, eggs are healthy

May 31, 2015
UnknownNet Photography / Flickr

One day you hear they’re good for you and other days you hear they’re bad. The healthiness (or unhealthiness) of eggs have been debated for decades. Does the protein outweigh the cholesterol? What makes an egg good or bad and should we continue incorporating eggs into our diets?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Luc Djousse discusses the nutritional value of eggs. Djousse is director of research in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Want a taste? Taste buds and supertasters

May 31, 2015
animantis / Flickr

The human tongue is an organ that enables us to enjoy the sense of taste. And on the tongue lies those bumps that we call our taste buds, which makes eating chocolate so pleasurable and ice cream so indulgent.

This week on “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp talk to Dr. Linda Bartoshuk about how those taste buds work and why people have different tastes than others. Dr. Bartoshuk is the director of human research at the University of Florida Center for Smell and Taste, and is the scientist behind the groundbreaking discovery of supertasters -- individuals who have stronger reactions to taste than most of us.

Eggs -- incredible again?

May 29, 2015
Marina Shemesh / Flickr

First medical experts told us not to eat too many eggs because they're high in cholesterol. But earlier this year, we were told that eating cholesterol is not what causes heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care", hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. Luc Djousse, director of research in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. They discuss the nutrients found in eggs and how dietary cholesterol really works.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Central New York boosters of universal health care are celebrating this week, after the state Assembly passed the New York Health Act.

The legislation would provide universal, comprehensive health care to all New Yorkers.

“What it means is -- basically -- when you’re born, you have health insurance,” says retired physician Joal Potash. He volunteers at free medical clinics in Syracuse.

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States and the result of factors that may include hormone levels, genetics, medications and one’s environment, according to Dr. Ramsay Farah, division chief of dermatology at Upstate Medical University.

On this week’s show, Farah explains how medications to fight acne have improved and how early treatment helps avoid scarring.

Also tune in for discussion on prostate cancer medications, water safety and stroke care. Plus, Deirdre Neilen shares a poem from The Healing Muse, Upstate's literary journal.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Finding out who tests positive for the H-I-V virus and getting them treated are cornerstones of a central New York strategy to meet the state’s goal of ending AIDS by 2020.  

HIV testing by ACR Health is already up 20 percent since December, after a new push to get more people tested according to Jeanette O’Connor-Shanley, the agency's director of support services. And when individuals test positive, they move on to the next part of their strategy to cut back on the number of new aids patients. 

Mike Mozart / Flickr

Central New York emergency medical technicians have increasingly been on the lookout for liquid nicotine overdoses.  

As the use of smokeless e-cigarettes continues to grow, more and more liquid nicotine is ending up in the homes of Americans. And it’s not safe, says Upstate Medical University toxicologist Nicholas Nacca.

River Hospital

A program at River Hospital in Alexandria Bay, N.Y., that treats soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder will end in July. The Army issued orders to move mental health treatment onto military installations.

Ben Moore, the program’s director, said his staff successfully treated more than 250 soldiers with PTSD since 2012.

"I was absolutely stunned," Moore said. "I had no warning. Now we're going to have to figure out how we adapt to this.”

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

It’s time for emergency rooms to prepare for typical summertime injuries involving children. Often that means accidents involving kids on bikes, skateboards or scooters. One Syracuse hospital says the worst of those injuries can be avoided.

When 10-year-old Michael Caltabiano of Syracuse heads out on his bike, he always wears a helmet. And when he sees other kids without one, he has a message for them:

"I tell them that wearing a helmet, keeps them out of the hospital. It’s a great, great idea."

marknewell / Flickr

Nurses who provide care to cancer patients do some of the most emotionally difficult work there is in medicine. The life and death situations they routinely face can lead to what was once known as burnout, but is now called "compassion fatigue." The issue is compounded by the ethical dilemmas that frequently surround end-of-life treatment decisions made by physicians and family members.

This week on “Take Care,” Pattie Jakel discusses the ethics of oncology nursing. Jakel is a clinical nurse specialist in the Solid Oncology Program at the UCLA Santa Monica Hospital, Santa Monica, California. She has a master’s degree in nursing and has published studies on the ethical conflicts of oncology nursing.

Green thumb, healthy plate

May 24, 2015
Vicki Moore / Flickr

Vegetables that people grow themselves have benefits not available through any other source. If you want salad for dinner, you can walk into your own garden and pick it yourself. You know nobody else has handled it, it hasn't traveled miles to your table and you're getting all of nature's nutrients at their peak.

So how hard is it to grow a vegetable garden? This week on “Take Care,” Marie Iannotti recommends five healthy vegetables that are also easy to grow for the modest gardener. Iannotti is a longtime master gardener, a former Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulture educator, master gardener program coordinator, and a member of the Garden Writer's Association and The Garden Conservancy. She's the author of two gardening books and is the gardening expert at About.com.

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