Health

Reporting on health issues

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Breast cancer is the deadliest cancer for women in the United States. So what are the risk factors for this kind of cancer? And can anything be done to minimize them?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Ann Partridge discusses how to decrease the risk in the development of cancer. Partridge is an associate professor at Harvard Medical School, the founder and director of the Program for Young women with Breast Cancer and the director of the Adult Survivorship Program at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

A tooth has been bothering you for a couple of days now, maybe for the first time – but maybe not. Tooth pain can be just that, a pain, but with new options in the field of dentistry, you could be pain free and chomping at the bit in no time.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Phillip Sheridan explains how dental implants work. Dr. Sheridan is an associate professor of dentistry in the Mayo Clinic’s dental specialties department.

This week: medical providers who volunteer knowledge, skills

Jan 23, 2015

Nurse Laurie Rupracht is recruiting medical professionals to accompany her on a trip to Ghana (her fifth) through the Americans Serving Abroad Project. As in previous years, her group will staff a mobile medical clinic in villages at least 100 miles from a hospital.

"People are afraid to go anywhere in Africa, thinking Ebola is everywhere. Ghana has not had one case of Ebola," she says.

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among american women. The role genetics plays in who gets breast cancer has been reported a lot recently. But there are also other risk factors. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with oncologist Dr. Ann Partridge of the Dana Farber Institute about the lifestyle changes women can make to help reduce their risk.

Lorraine Rapp: Let’s talk briefly about who is at most risk for getting breast cancer in the general population -- not genetics, not family history.

Sudipto Sarkar / Flickr

More central New Yorkers are apt to smoke cigarettes, than anywhere else in New York State. This comes at a time when most private health insurance plans, as well as Medicaid and Medicare cover smoking cessation strategies. So why the disconnect?  Experts say getting people to quit comes down to education.

According to the New York State Health Department, just over 22 percent of central New York adults smoke. The state smoking rate is 10 points below that.  

Science finds you can teach an old dog new tricks

Jan 18, 2015
Dierk Schaefer / Flickr

It may seem like a truism that older people are set in their ways. But research is showing that the human brain is uniquely designed to allow people to change, even as we age.

This week on “Take Care,” author David DiSalvo discusses what science has discovered about our adaptability and how people can use that knowledge to make changes in their own behavior. DiSalvo is the author of three books about the human brain and cognitive psychology. His most recent is "Brain Changer: How Harnessing Your Brain's Power to Adapt Can Change Your Life."

Workout worries for the 'weekend warrior'

Jan 18, 2015
Global Panorama / Flickr

You’re always so busy during the day that when evening comes you’re too tired to exercise. So you decide to wait for the weekend and work out extra hard to make up for it. But is that a good idea?

This week on “Take Care,” health writer Gretchen Reynolds discusses the dangers of being a “weekend warrior.” Reynolds writes for The New York Times “Well Blog” and is the author of the book “The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer.”

Research shows flexibility of human brain

Jan 16, 2015

Change is often hard. But new research shows that the human brain is much more flexible than once thought. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with David DiSalvo, the author of the book "Brain Changer: How Harnessing Your Brain's Power to Adapt Can Change Your Life." DiSalvo says this discovery is one of the biggest coming out of neuroscience research in recent years.

Syracuse University professor R. David Lankes joins us to speak about his treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma; more specifically, the type of patient he was striving to be.

His novel, "The Boring Patient," chronicles his time in the hospital.

"In the hospital, or during chemotherapy, I want to be the charming man who only requires a vitals check or a scheduled chemo dose," Lankes writes. "You don't wan to be interesting in most medical settings. Interesting means complications, and that is bad."

cdc.gov

The Onondaga County Health Department is urging anyone who thinks they have the flu to call their doctor and get treated. Health officials hope getting the word out about the severity of this year's deadly flu strain can ultimately contain it.

Usually the health department updates flu numbers on its website each Thursday, but this week officials sent a special news release on Tuesday, noting there has been a total of 550 flu cases reported so far, and seven flu-related deaths.

Jefferson County Community Services Office

The Pentagon may spend millions towards suicide prevention programs for our military. But smaller-scale programs meant to help those outside the military also exist around the nation. WRVO's Julia Botero speaks to Timothy Ruetten from the Jefferson County Community Services Office about a coalition of mental health agencies, school officials and nonprofits  that work together to make sure they're up to date on the best ways to reduce and prevent suicides in Jefferson County.

Julia Botero / WRVO

 

Since 2001, more active-duty American soldiers have killed themselves than were killed in Afghanistan.

President Barack Obama acknowledged the soaring suicide rate in the United States military in a speech in North Carolina last summer. Obama said, "We have to end this tragedy of suicide among our troops and veterans. As a country, we can't stand idly by on such tragedy, so we're doing even more.”

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Upstate New York’s harsh winters and even harsher winds can be dangerous. One of the health risks, if you are caught out in the elements, or without a source of heat for a period of time, is hypothermia.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Chris McStay talks about how hypothermia affects the body and how to prevent it. McStay is chief of clinical operations at the department of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Alberto Pasini / Flickr

With menopause comes hot flashes, night sweats and more uncomfortable side effects. But what if we told you there was something right in your pocket (or purse) that could help you deal with all of these symptoms?

This week on “Take Care,” we speak with Dr. JoAnn Manson about a new app that can help you deal with menopause. Manson is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical school and chief of preventive medicine a Brigham and Women’s hospital.

Bitter cold: the basics of hypothermia

Jan 9, 2015
Corey Templeton / Flickr

In these cold winter months, the risk for hypothermia rises. You don't have to be an outdoor enthusiast or an avid hiker, in fact, don't even have to be outside to develop hypothermia. A few degrees means the difference between a normal core body temperature, and a temperature dangerously close to hypothermia.

This week on "Take Care," we speak with Dr. Chris McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about hypothermia and how to avoid it.

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A bad flu virus continues to spread through the community, as flu cases in Onondaga County are up five-fold from this time last year.

The flu is coming early and often for much of the United States, according to health officials, and central New York has not been spared.

Mike Blyth / Flickr

In the early days of the AIDS epidemic, a positive diagnosis was virtually a death sentence.  Today, a person taking antiretroviral medications can live long term with the disease as a chronic infection. Now researchers are looking into why the aging population living with HIV/AIDS is at greater risk for heart disease and stroke.

Clinical researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center will use a $3.8 million grant to investigate why people treated with antiretrovirals for HIV have higher than average rates of heart disease and stroke.

People who walk regularly for exercise may notice that their speed declines and they tire more easily as they age. But is that because they are aging? Could that reduction in pace and energy be slowed or reversed by other types of exercise, like running?

Upstate Medical University exercise physiologist Carol Sames explains how running was found to be more beneficial than walking in a study that compared walkers and runners in Boulder, Colorado. She says running is not appropriate for everyone, and she offers some other ways walkers can add intensity to their workouts.

Health exchange official pleased with state sign-ups

Jan 8, 2015
Possible Health / Flickr

Traffic on the New York State of Health website is holding steady following the first deadline for open enrollment.

Donna Frescatore, executive director of the New York State of Health Benefit Exchange, is pleased with the numbers of New Yorkers signing up for health insurance on the marketplace.

New York State Health Department officials saw an increase in the numbers of enrollees in time to get covered at the start of the New Year. Frescatore says she expects more high traffic days as the next deadlines roll around.

Using guided imagery to help patients cope

Jan 4, 2015
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The mind-body connection is increasingly being explored by doctors, scientists and others. Research shows that guided imagery can help turn around the way your mind works, thus the way your body behaves. 

This week on “Take Care,” Jane Pernotto Ehrman speaks about how guided imagery works. Ehrman is lead behavioral health specialist at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Lifestyle Medicine in the Wellness Institute, and has had personal experience with guided imagery working for her.

Thirteen of Clubs / Flickr

Avoiding stressful moments can be difficult living in today’s society. But new research about the impact of stress on your heart may make you want to try.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Peter Gianaros shares his research and advice on the risks stress has on the heart. Gianaros is an associate professor in the department of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Stress, anxiety and heart health

Jan 2, 2015
Nicolas Raymond / freestock.ca via Flickr

Can stress, anxiety and depression cause heart disease? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Peter Gianaros, a psychology professor at the University of Pittsburgh about his research into how the mind-body connection effects heart health.

Lorraine Rapp: What have you learned about how what we think and feel effect cardiovascular health?

This week: winter head injuries, and positive parenting

Dec 31, 2014

Protecting yourself from head injury during the winter goes beyond wearing a helmet while skiing and skating, according to concussion expert Brian Rieger, PhD.

"Behavior is as important as safety equipment," Rieger says.

More about traumatic brain injury prevention and why helmets may not protect against concussion.

Also this week: the principles of discipline and new research on parenting. Plus, a place for hospitalized children to keep up with schoolwork, within Upstate Golisano Children's Hospital.

Credit USACE Europe District / via Flickr

Onondaga County health officials are urging residents to get a flu shot after the flu season has gotten off to a strong start.

"What we are seeing is increased hospitalizations and increased number of cases. We are comparing last year’s versus this year’s. So there is a quite upsurge," said county health commissioner Dr. Indu Gupta.

nystateofhealth.ny.gov

With a month and a half left in the second open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act, professionals who help connect New Yorkers with insurance see a change in how individuals approach health coverage this year.

Many health insurance professionals say New Yorkers understand Obamacare better this year.

Jeff Welcher, account consultant with Rochester-area Bene-Care, says choosing a plan is still not a decision to be taken lightly.

Meditation: a Take Care takeaway in 2014

Dec 28, 2014
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As we wrap up another year on "Take Care," we'd like to thank you for joining us. You're the reason why leading experts from a variety of fields come on the show each week. They're passionate about health and wellness and eager to share their knowledge with you. From them we learned a simple fact: Change your habits, and you can change your life.

Healthcare open enrollment poses challenges for some

Dec 26, 2014
jasleen_kaur / Flickr

For those with variable incomes, signing up for health insurance on the New York State of Health Marketplace can be tricky.

The application asks for information about income to help determine whether an individual qualifies for an advanced premium tax credit. In the case of a sole proprietor, it may not be clear how much they will make in any given year.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

John Dau is a man that perseveres. And the staff of his medical foundation on the ground in South Sudan is no different. Since the Duk Lost Boys Clinic in rural South Sudan was destroyed in March by rebel fighters, the medical team has fanned out to keep working.

People who are obese are likely to have fast heart rates and after weight loss surgery, when concentrations of the hormone leptin drop, so does a person’s heart rate, says Rushikesh Shah, MD (who is completing his training in internal medicine at Upstate University Hospital). More on this "physiological compensatory change" and ways to help avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests and medical interventions.

Also this week: a special dance class for people with Parkinson's disease to improves balance, gait and strength and a program for those with a high risk for breast cancer.

Trysil / Flickr

The time to pull out the winter sporting gear has come, but with it comes the possibility of injury

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Navan Duggal discusses the strain winter sports can have on the body and what you can do to decrease the risk of injury. Duggal was chief of the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is currently in private practice at Syracuse Orthopedic Surgeons.

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