Health

Reporting on health issues

Pots, pans & PFOAs

17 hours ago
sarah / Flickr

The chemicals used to make Teflon have been in the news in New York state this year, as one area deals with water contamination from a manufacturing plant that made pots and pans. But how healthy is the Teflon and other kinds of cookware Americans use in their kitchens every day? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Laura Vandenberg, professor at the UMass Amherst School of Public Health and Health Science. She is an expert on human exposure to chemicals and chemical mixtures.

This week: treating eating disorders and more

Nov 30, 2016

This Sunday on "HealthLink on Air," radiation oncologist Dr. Michael Mix explains how stereotactic radiation can shorten treatment for some cancer patients. Plus, social worker Kathleen Deters-Hayes goes over treatment options for people with eating disorders.

Join us this Sunday, December 4 at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. for "HealthLink on Air" on WRVO.

The need for living kidney donors is growing, partly because people are living longer on dialysis, explains Dr. Vaughn Whittaker, a transplant surgeon at Upstate University Hospital.

People are usually born with two kidneys and can live with just one, and a kidney from a live donor tends to be of higher quality, he says. Whittaker explains the safety factors and support system that let almost any healthy adult make a living kidney donation, as well as  breakthroughs like the ability to donate to someone with an incompatible blood type.

A different kind of doctor

Nov 19, 2016
Alex Proimos / Flickr

The nurse comes in to take vitals and ask some questions. Then, he or she says the doctor will be in shortly.

Short. That ends up describing the time the doctor spends with you. Many have had a similar experience when going to see their doctor. But, what if that didn’t have to be the case? What if there were doctors who took more time to really dig into a patient’s problem?

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Pina LoGiudice, a naturopathic doctor, joins the program to talk about who exactly those in her field are, what it is they do for their patients, and how they are different from traditional medical doctors.

Preventing and coping with holiday depression

Nov 19, 2016
Chad Sparkes / Flickr

It’s that time of year again to spread joy for all to hear—or so you’re told. Although the holiday season can create happy memories, it can also be a stressful time and leave many with feelings of depression for various reasons.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Ken Duckworth talks about holiday depression, what may cause it, and how to support those who suffer from it. Duckworth is the medical director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), and is also an assistant clinical professor at Harvard University Medical School.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources / Flickr

You may have heard the term "naturopathic medicine" as it is gaining in popularity. But what are the theories behind it? And what's the difference in a naturopathic doctor versus a traditional M.D.? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Pina LoGuidice, a naturopathic doctor who has taught at New York University and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine.

This week: empathy, childhood cancer, holiday hazards

Nov 17, 2016

Establishing empathy for a patient can be tough for doctors under increasing time pressure. Yet empathy -- being able to see the world as the patient does -- can benefit both the patient and the doctor, says Dr. Louise Prince, an emergency physician at Upstate University Hospital.

Pets, peace of mind, & the end of life

Nov 12, 2016
Barbara M. / Flickr

For pet owners, their four-footed companions are not merely animals -- they are family members who offer unequivocal love, often when it’s needed the most.

But when a person goes under hospice care, sometimes no one is able to care for the family pet. This week on “Take Care,” Dianne McGill explains a program she founded called Pet Peace of Mind, which allows hospice patients to keep their pets and spend time with them.

Cost effective drugs are still effective

Nov 12, 2016
zacharmstrong / Flickr

 

Generic drugs and brand name drugs have a number of differences. They can have different names, different colors and different prices to name a few. However, these differences do not necessarily mean generics and brand names don’t have the same effects.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Elizabeth Higdon, an instructor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences campus in Colchester, Vermont, joins the program to talk about the quality of generic drugs, why they’re different from brand names and their benefits.

Higdon holds a doctor of pharmacy degree, teaches classes on over-the-counter medications and works as a community pharmacist.

Peace of mind for hospice patients' pets

Nov 11, 2016
Giorgio Quattrone / Flickr

When a patient goes under hospice care, their well being and comfort is the priority. But in this stressful time, families are often unable to care for the patient’s pet. But sometimes a pet's unequivocal love is exactly what the hospice patient needs. Now, a national organization is trying to help fix this problem. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the president and founder of Pet Peace of Mind, Dianne McGill.

Hernias can be dangerous and should be evaluated by a medical professional, but not all require a surgical repair, says Dr. Moustafa Hassan, director of acute care surgery at Upstate University Hospital.

Hernias are weak spots where an internal organ bulges through muscle or tissue. They commonly occur in the groin, called inguinal hernias. Incisional hernias may develop at the site of previous surgery.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

While New York would not be as greatly affected as other states if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, there could be some changes to the health exchange. Republicans, controlling the House, Senate and soon the presidency, are now positioned to repeal President Obama’s healthcare law.

Whole grains add more than carbs and calories to a diet

Nov 5, 2016
George Wesley & Bonita Dannells / Flickr

An estimated 20 to 30 percent of the population has trended toward gluten-free products in an attempt to avoid whole grains these days. According to Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic, people who are not gluten intolerant should eat those whole grains for their many different health advantages.

This week on “Take Care,” Hensrud, the medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller, “The Mayo Clinic Diet,” talks about what whole grains are and their benefits.

Using hypnosis for more than just entertainment

Nov 5, 2016
Adam Dachis / Flickr

Hypnosis is often demonstrated in the entertainment world as someone dangling a stopwatch in front of another’s face telling them they’re “getting very sleepy,” and then when the person awakes, engaging in some bizarre behavior. But there’s more value to hypnosis than just entertainment.

Hypnosis can be used to medically treat disorders that involve the brain -- such as anxiety, stress, pain, and bad habits. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Spiegel of Stanford University explains the medical value of hypnosis. Spiegel is Willson Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of the Center on Stress and Health, and Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford School of Medicine.

The whole story on whole grains

Nov 4, 2016
Ross Catrow / Flickr

The current diet trends to eat low-carb or go gluten-free have resulted in many people giving up a food group long believed to be part of a healthy diet -- whole grains. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of the bestseller, The Mayo Clinic Diet. Hensrud discusses the benefits of eating whole grains.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney rolled up her sleeve this week, not to work, but to show central New Yorkers how easy it is to get a flu shot.

"This took me less than a minute, and if you get the flu, you are down for a couple days and you’re making everybody around you sick,” Mahoney said. “It is a much better use of your time to take one minute and get your flu shot.”

This week: childhood illnesses, portion sizes, more

Nov 2, 2016

Colds and viruses get passed around by children, but families can get through such illnesses by following some simple practices and staying in touch with a doctor, says Dr. Jaclyn Sisskind, a pediatrician at Upstate University Hospital.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Regardless of politics, New York state will most likely continue with its New York State of Health official health insurance marketplace, according to Steve Wood, director of insurance programs at ACR Health in Syracuse. He said New York is committed to the program that grew out of the Affordable Care Act.

Mecklenburg County / Flickr

The idea of cancer can make many of us uncomfortable, and with that discomfort can come uncertainty, and fears about our own mortality. But when a friend or relative is facing a diagnosis of cancer, that's when they need the most understanding and support.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mindy Greenstein, a cancer survivor herself, gives some advice on how to talk to someone who has cancer. Greenstein is a clinical psychologist, psycho-oncologist, and a consultant in the Department of Psychiatry at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She's also the author of the book “The House on Crash Corner and Other Unavoidable Calamities.”

5 seconds too long: Do's and dont's of food safety

Oct 29, 2016
Didriks / Flickr

There are good bacteria and there are bad bacteria. No matter which kind gets on food, many people get grossed out by the thought.

Scientists are not certain how these germs are transferred from one place to the next, but research has helped offer some tips to protect from contaminating food.

This week on Take Care, Don Schaffner, a food microbiologist and professor at Rutgers University, shares what he has discovered on the subject as well as a few tips he uses within his own home.

Richard Munckton / Flickr

The so-called “five-second rule” is something many of us cited when we drop a piece of food on the floor and then eat it anyway. But how does cross contamination of food really happen? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Don Schaffner, a Rutgers University food microbiologist and food safety expert about how bacteria transfers onto food.

This week: earthquake, healthy seniors and organ transplants

Oct 20, 2016

During the earthquake in Ecuador last April, Upstate Medical University scientist Anna Stewart Ibarra and her team of researchers helped mobilize relief efforts, including setting up a basic health clinic and buying emergency supplies with money donated by central New Yorkers.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The opioid epidemic claims more victims than those who die of an overdose. Families, friends and loved ones are left living through grief singed with shame and judgment. But there’s now somewhere they can go to get help in central New York.

Quinnika Ayers of Syracuse lost her son Drequan Robinson last year to a lethal cocktail of MDMA, Zanax and fentanyl. He was a student at SUNY Morrisville, and was found unresponsive at a friend’s home after a party. Ayers says Robinson had a troubled youth, but felt he’d turned a corner—or so she thought.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

Earlier this fall, the Indian River Central School District in Jefferson County identified lead contamination in five sites around the district. Last month, state law went into effect requiring all schools test their drinking water for the toxic material. Lead is extremely harmful to young children, often leading to lower IQ’s, behavioral problems and even brain damage.

Jo. / Flickr

Imagine you’re in an enclosed space that you feel you can’t escape easily, like a crowded elevator or a room with no windows. For some, this can automatically trigger their response to get out of there, or cause avoidance of these situations altogether.

Claustrophobia can cause these feelings, and is something many people can suffer from. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Robin Zasio, a psychologist who specializes in treating OCD, anxiety disorders, and related conditions, helps define claustrophobia and the treatment that can help eliminate it. Zasio is founder, owner, and director of The Anxiety Treatment Center, The Cognitive Behavior Therapy Center, and The Compulsive Hoarding Center, all located in Sacramento, Calif. Zasio is also the author of "The Hoarder In You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Movement matters more than sitting or standing at work

Oct 15, 2016
Christoph Spiegl / Flickr

Recent research has suggested sitting all day is bad for a person’s health. According to U.S. News and World Report’s Anna Medaris Miller, standing desks have come in vogue due to companies using the research in marketing campaigns. But, she says solely standing is not the answer.

This week on Take Care, Medaris talks about the benefits and harms of standing at work she learned while reporting her story “5 Ways Your Standing Desk Is Doing More Harm Than Good.”

Loren Kerns / Flickr

Many Americans spend a good portion of the day sitting. Between a 40-hour work week and a commute, time spent sitting adds up, as do the associated health problems. Enter the standing desk. A popular option, the standing desk may be an effective way to combat risk factors associated with sitting.

But it's not just sitting that gets a bad rap. Standing for long periods of time can also take a toll on the body. Nurses, teachers and other professionals often complain of back pain and other stress associated with being on their feet day in and day out.

Not every breast lump is cancerous, but "unless we do imaging and, at times, even a biopsy, we won't know that it's not cancer," explains Upstate University Hospital's Dr. Sam Benjamin, a medical oncologist who specializes in chemotherapy and cancer care.

The skinny on skin conditions

Oct 8, 2016
Carolyn / Flickr

Atopic dermatitis, the most common form of eczema, is a skin condition that begins shortly after birth. While it usually goes away as a child gets older, it can sometimes continue into adulthood.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Whitney High, associate professor of dermatology and pathology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, discusses several skin conditions, their causes and ways to treat them. High is the director of the school’s dermatology lab and a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology.

DigitalRalph / Flickr

We can all be a bit forgetful sometimes, but when it becomes a life concerning issue, like dementia, there isn’t much that can be done in terms of treatment. However, new research suggests there may be action that can be taken in terms of prevention.

This week on “Take Care,” science and medical journalist Dan Hurley tells us how brain training games may lead to a significant reduction in risk for dementia. Hurley wrote the article, “Could Brain Training Prevent Dementia?” for the New Yorker on the study, and is the author of the book, “Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power.”

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