Health

Reporting on health issues

Doctor house calls go high-tech

16 hours ago
CNBP / Flickr

The idea of the old-fashioned doctor house call has gone high-tech. Now, there are smart phone apps to schedule a home doctor visit or video conference call with a medical practitioner. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak to health and technology reporter Jennifer Jolly about what's driving this trend. Jolly writes the Wired Well column for the New York Times Well blog.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

There was no cake, but Medicare’s 50th birthday was serenaded by a few dozen Central New Yorkers in downtown Syracuse Thursday. 

Medicare and Medicaid were signed into law in 1965, and have been providing medical care for the poor and elderly ever since.  Robert O’Connor of Onondaga County’s AARP, says the milestone is worth noting.

An aging population and the Affordable Care Act help ensure the demand for physician assistants, physical therapists and other health care providers will continue, says Hugh Bonner, the former dean of Upstate Medical University’s College of Health Professions.

“Between 2000 and 2030, we will double the population of those 65 and older. We’ll go from essentially 35 million to 70 million people. That population also has a large number of individuals with chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes,” Bonner says.

Stigma around seeking treatment for mental health problems is a bigger barrier in communities of color. That's according to MaJose Carrasco the director of the Multicultural Action Center at the National Alliance on Mental Illness -- or NAMI.

July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Representatives from NAMI say they’re fighting isolation many people living with mental illness experience.

www.newlabor.org

Over two million American workers are exposed to silica dust in industries like construction, mining, road repair and sand blasting. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is now pushing for tougher limits on how much silica dust they can be exposed to in the workplace.

But the proposed rules will come too late for many workers who’ve already contracted the potentially fatal lung disease, silicosis. 

How to survive the wilderness

Jul 26, 2015
Al_HikesAZ / Flickr

Lost in the wilderness, people tend to make things worse for themselves by trying to find their way out, or looking aimlessly for food. Yet staying calm and staying put might guarantee your safety faster than anything else.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Christopher McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. McStay was also the former chief of service for the Bellevue Hospital Emergency Department in New York City, where he treated patients who have survived extreme circumstances such as Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy.

The reality of contact lenses

Jul 26, 2015
Andy Simmons / Flickr

Contact lenses have become a cultural norm as more and more people make the switch from glasses to contacts. But are people using these lenses correctly, and do they know exactly how these lenses even work?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to contact lens expert Dr. Bryan Lee, a cornea, cataract and Lasik specialist, whose practice is located in Los Altos, California. Lee is also a member of the Council of American Academy of Ophthalmology.

This week: hernia repair, Lyme disease and midlife changes

Jul 24, 2015

Hernias, which are potentially dangerous openings in the abdominal wall, can result from car wrecks and other injuries. Their treatment has changed in the past decade, says Dr. Moustafa Hassan, director of acute care surgery at Upstate University Hospital.

Hiking in the woods and mountains is a popular activity. But if you take the wrong fork in the trail and get lost, a day of recreation can turn into an exercise in staying safe. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Dr. Christopher McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the University of Colorado. They discuss the basics of surviving in the wilderness for the average person.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Democrats in the New York State Assembly have come through with some cash for Crouse Hospital in Syracuse to help fund its opioid and heroin abuse program.  

The majority conference is committing $400,000 to Crouse, which runs the only methadone program in the region. It’s struggling to keep up with demand spurred by the recent spike in heroin and opiate addiction across the country and in central New York. Right now the program serves 600 patients; another 500 are on a waiting list. The hospital treats patients who are from the Southern Tier to the North Country.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

The numbers of synthetic marijuana cases called into the Upstate New York Poison Center continues to be off the charts. Officials say there could be more than 800 by the end of the year if the cases don’t abate.

Blue Zones residents living longer, healthier lives

Jul 19, 2015
Ed Schipul / Flickr

Roughly one in 5,000 people in the United States lives to be 100 years old, yet there are concentrated places in the world where living to 100 is not unusual, and people manage to live this long without contracting any preventable diseases. These areas, called “Blue Zones,” are located in Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; Ogliastra Region, Sardinia; Loma Linda, California; and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to National Geographic Explorer Dan Buettner, who has traveled the globe to uncover the longevity secrets used in these Blue Zones, how these people are able to live for such a remarkably long time. Buettner recently released his latest book, “The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People.”

Hot dogs and hamburgers: the truth about the meat we buy

Jul 19, 2015
Chris H / Flickr

According to the National Sausage and Hot Dog Council, during peak hotdog season, Americans typically consume 7 billion hot dogs. But what exactly is in these hotdogs that people buy at the supermarket, and is it healthy for people to be eating so many of them?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Kerri-Ann Jennings about what exactly is in the meat of the hot dogs and hamburgers that we eat. Jennings is a registered dietician and nutritionist, as well as former editor for Eating Well Magazine.

WXXI News

Six-year-old Jason Green is spending his afternoon at the dentist’s office, but his focus is on the many stickers he is earning by behaving during the appointment.

“Well, I have been really good,” Jason beams, holding a stack of adhesive monster truck drawings.

To live longer, live like you're in a 'Blue Zone'

Jul 17, 2015
almekri01 / Flickr

It seems everyone is looking for a secret to living a long, healthy life. But Dan Buettner, a National Geographic explorer and author has traveled the world to find it.

This week on WRVO's health and wellness program "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Buettner about why a higher percentage of people in what he calls "Blue Zones" live to be 100 years old without preventable diseases.

Support for this story comes from The Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

A minimally invasive procedure called salivary endoscopy allows a surgeon to find and remove a stone while leaving the salivary gland intact. The surgery, which can be done in a doctor’s office, offers an alternative to open surgery, said Dr. Mark Marzouk. Dr. Marzouk is an ear, nose and throat surgeon who leads the division of head and neck oncologic surgery at Upstate University Hospital.

Also on this week’s show:  how medical care is provided at crime scenes when someone is still shooting, and a book created by psychiatric patients.

G155 / Flickr

The Carol Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund of Central New York is going national.  

Pink Outside the Box is a 12-week fund raising campaign that will encourage supporters to raise money in unique ways with the funds helping researchers at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. 

One researcher, Dr. Debashis Ghosh, is hoping to use some of the money raised on a project that could prevent breast cancer.

Michelle Faust / WXXI

 

Deaths from drug overdose have outpaced automobile accidents as the leading cause of injury in 35 states, including New York. But the state is making strides to curtail that trend. Physicians are integral to treating addiction, but the country has a shortage of doctors with training in the specialty.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Onondaga County is ready to okay a second aerial spraying to kill mosquitoes that carry Eastern Equine Encephalitis near the Cicero swamp if the virus turns up again. County officials made the announcement in a woman’s backyard -- a woman who lived to tell the tale of EEE.

Denise Broton started feeling sick about this time last year, during a camping trip to the Adirondacks.

“You don’t survive EEE. I’m the first person in Onondaga County and the first person in the United States over the last 30 years, I guess, to have survived it,” Broton says.

How to avoid dehydration throughout the summer

Jul 12, 2015
faungg / Flickr

Water and summer go together like peanut butter and jelly. From the ocean to backyard pools, water tends to be a way of life for most during hot weather. But while everyone is having fun many forget how important it is to drink water as well.

This week on “Take Care,” health expert Johannah Sakimura talks about the importance of staying hydrated during these hot summer months.

roujo / Flickr

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States, but the number of heart disease related deaths has declined over the past 50 years and continues to do so.

This week on “Take Care,” New York Times health and science reporter Gina Kolata talks about the minor changes hospitals have made to heart attack treatments that might have an impact on heart disease deaths in the U.S.

osseous / Flickr

The leading cause of death in the U.S. has seen an incredible drop in the last decade or so. That's because hospitals have made a series of small changes that have led to the survival of more heart attack victims. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with New York Times health and science reporter Gina Kolata about what she found were the reasons behind this change.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

 

After previous attempts in past years were unsuccessful, St. Joseph's Hospital in Syracuse is now becoming a member of Trinity Health, the second largest not-for-profit health system in the country. Trinity Health will now have 87 hospitals, operating in 21 states while employing up to 119,000 workers.

 

Kathryn Ruscitto, the president and CEO of St. Joseph's Hospital, said she's already seeing how joining Trinity is helping the hospital.

 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO Media Company

    

The Upstate Cancer Center, in Syracuse, is expanding its mammography screening program, which focuses on residents who live in public housing.

The program, called She Matters, has spent the last year encouraging women over the age of 40 from Pioneer Homes, a predominately African-American housing complex in downtown Syracuse, to get the breast cancer detecting tests.  Since then, 88 women have received the tests, with one woman being diagnosed.

This week: enlarged prostates, lead in the soil and more

Jul 2, 2015

Some men with enlarged prostates can be treated with a minimally-invasive surgery that uses a high-powered laser to remove the obstructive portion of the prostate. The procedure, called holmium laser enucleation of the prostate, is now offered by Dr. Jessica Paonessa, an assistant professor of urology at Upstate University Hospital.

“For many men, taking medicine for this condition isn’t something they want to do long term, and for other patients, the medications may not be effective,” Paonessa said. “In these cases, the next step is to remove the obstructive tissue surgically.”

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Now that school’s out, the Syracuse City School District will start offering breakfast and lunch to inner city children through its Summer Food Service Program.  But the program doesn’t reach all the children who may be going hungry without that daily breakfast, lunch and snack they get during the school year.

Joseph Morris / Flickr

Regulations surrounding the use of electronic cigarettes and the liquid nicotine that fuels them continue to increase in New York state, but anti-smoking activists are hoping for more.

The Clean Indoor Air Act of 2003 prohibited smoking in public places, but that doesn’t automatically apply to the newest trend in tobacco use, e-cigarettes, says American Heart Association Spokeswoman Kristy Smorol.

The link between brain disease and our gut

Jun 28, 2015
James Joel / Flickr

The hip bone is connected to the back bone. The back bone is connected to the chest bone. But is the brain connected to the gut?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Perlmutter sits down to discuss the connection between gut and brain health. Perlmutter is an associate professor at the University of Miami School of Medicine, a board-certified neurologist and fellow of the American College of Nutrition.

Kevin Krejci / Flickr

With the sun beating down during these summer months, many of us lather on some sunscreen and find relief in the nearest body of water. Pools however, often used as a shield from the sun’s harmful rays, might not be as harmless as we think.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber, assistant professor of dermatology at the Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, addresses chlorine and its effect on our skin and hair.

After dispensing medical care and supplies in the aftermath of the April 25 earthquake in his native Nepal, Dr. Dinesh Subedi is focusing on rebuilding.

The disaster killed more than 9,000 people and left nearly 3 million homeless.

Subedi traveled with locally donated supplies and joined Nepali doctors from the United States to treat 25 or 30 people in each of several villages, usually hiking amid the flattened buildings and landslides.

Pages