Health

Reporting on health issues

Keeping food cold, fresh & safe

6 hours ago
Celeste Lindell / Flickr

Many of take for granted that our refrigerator is going to keep our food cold and fresh. But refrigerators have become an essential tool in ensuring food safety. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with food safety specialist and North Carolina State University professor Benjamin Chapman about how to make sure your refrigerator is keeping your food as safe and healthy as possible. Chapman also is a co-host of the podcast Food Safety Talk.

Art therapist Maria Fazzini uses creativity and a willing ear to improve the well-being of patients at the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital.

As an art therapist, Fazzini is a mental health professional who offers the opportunity to draw, paint or use other materials so that young patients can feel more at home, more relaxed and -- in many cases -- more willing to express their anxieties.

The goal is to provide emotional support, says Fazzini, who gets referrals from the medical staff. Participation is voluntary, and the time per session varies according to the patient.

The U.S. Army / Flickr

With acts of terror and war becoming all too common in the world today, it’s become an issue for parents about how they should address it with their children. They want their child to be aware, but they don’t want to scare them.

This week on “Take Care,” marriage and family therapist Susan Stiffelman shares how parents can break bad news to their children, while maintaining a sense of security. Stiffelman is a credentialed teacher, a licensed psychotherapist, and delivers weekly parenting advice as Huffington Post's “Parent Coach.” She is also the author of the bestselling book, "Parenting Without Power Struggles: Raising Joyful, Resilient Kids While Staying Cool, Calm and Connected," and the new book "Parenting with Presence: Practices for Raising Conscious, Confident, Caring Kids."

Acupuncture: needling the body to heal itself

Sep 10, 2016
sellyourseoul / Flickr

If acupuncture seems like something better performed on voodoo dolls, you may not be aware of the practice’s long historical tradition, and its more recent embrace by mainstream medicine.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Pina LoGiudice, a physician with training in naturopathic medicine and acupuncture, discusses how acupuncture works, and what it is used of. LoGiudice was also a pre-doctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health.

How to talk to kids about the news

Sep 9, 2016
Carlbb / Flickr

When scary news events like mass shootings and terror attacks happen, what should parents tell their kids? In a world where news is everywhere, how do you help them understand the situation without scaring them. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Susan Stiffelman, a family therapist and best-selling author about how and what to tell your kids about what's going on in the world. Stiffelman also delivers weekly parenting advice as Huffington Post's “Parent Coach.”

This week: end-of-life ethics, bullying, pediatric trauma

Sep 8, 2016

Life-and-death decisions were once made exclusively by doctors, but nowadays those matters are largely in the hands of patients. This can create conflict as relatives disagree over how to treat a failing patient. That’s where ethics consultants can help.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

A group of advocates for veterans want New York state to allow marijuana to be prescribed to service men or women suffering from post-traumatic stress disorders. 

Randi Weathers of the “We Are Listening” campaign says some other states allow marijuana for treatment of PTS. The group is collecting petition signatures to ask New York to do the same. Hundreds of visitors to the state fair have signed the petitions.

Meagan / Flickr

Knowing how to care for a specific genetic disorder before a child is born can make life a bit easier for all involved. This is where prenatal genetic testing can come in, however, it wasn’t always offered to everyone.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Jill Hechtman tells us about new advances in prenatal screening, and why it is now being recommended to more than just women with high risk pregnancies. Hechtman is the medical director of Tampa Obstetrics and the chairman of the department of OB/GYN at Brandon Regional Hospital. She is also a frequent face on NBC as "Dr. Jill" and occasionally FOX News.

Cosmetic dermatology gains in popularity

Sep 3, 2016
Jeanette McKennan / Flickr

The desire to look younger is nothing new. But while historically plastic surgery has been perceived as something for the wealthy and celebrities, cosmetic dermatology has now entered the mainstream. In 2013, the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery reported significant growth in cosmetic dermatology over the previous year, with some procedures up by as much as one-third.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber, president and founder of the Dermatology Institute of Boston discusses the benefits and risks of some of the most common types of cosmetic dermatology procedures.

Advances in pre-natal testing

Sep 2, 2016
Bri Stoterau / Flickr

Prenatal genetic testing used to only be given to pregnant women with risk factors and those over age 35. But now, with new non-invasive procedures, new recommendations encourage all pregnant women to be tested. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Jill Hechtman, medical director of Tampa obstetrics, about how the new prenatal tests work.

According to Dr. Kaushal Nanavati, a person’s wellness depends not just on managing his or her diseases, but on getting into a routine that brings contentment and peace. Nanavati is a family practitioner and medical director of integrative therapy at Upstate Medical University.

Reducing obesity through new bariatric procedures

Aug 27, 2016
Mike Licht / Flickr

Although obesity has been determined a disease of its own, there are also many other life-threatening diseases that can stem from it. This can include diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, cancer, high cholesterol, and many more.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Steven Edmundowicz talks about new approaches to bariatric surgery with fewer side effects, and the different ways the procedure can reduce obesity. Edmundowicz is the medical director of the Digestive Health Center at the University of Colorado Hospital, and is a visiting professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Thirteen Of Clubs / via Flickr

Living with a chronic disease can feel overwhelming when trying to keep up with treatment. However, some aspects could be improved simply by creating better communication between a patient and their doctor.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Victor Montori talks about his new approach to the doctor-patient relationship, which he calls minimally disruptive medicine. Montori is a part of the knowledge and evaluation research unit at the Mayo Clinic and is the director of community engagement and late stage translational research for the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

Phil and Pam Gradwell (to be) / Flickr

Sometimes doctors don't understand how hard it is for patients with chronic diseases to keep up with their treatment. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Victor Montori of the Mayo Clinic, who has developed a concept called "minimally disruptive medicine." The idea is for doctors and patients to communicate more about how best to fit a treatment plan into a patient's life.

Rebuilding the doctor-patient relationship

Aug 20, 2016
Andrew Malone / Flickr

When you visit the doctor you might feel like you spend more time in the waiting room than in the actual examination room. But with dozens of patients a day, it can be difficult for primary care doctors to spend more time with each person.

This week on "Take Care," Tom Blue explains how patients can get more face-to-face time with their doctor through something called concierge medicine. Blue is a pioneer in concierge medicine and has been building private physician practices since 2002. He is also the executive director of the American Academy of Private Physicians, and is the co-founder and chief strategy officer of LeadHealth, which focuses on functional medicine to control health care costs and improve the lives of its members.

Digging into the hidden subconcious of the brain

Aug 20, 2016
wyinoue / Flickr

Do you ever find yourself wondering why you do the things you do every day, or reach the decisions you make? Most of the time, small everyday tasks and decisions aren't given much thought by our conscious mind, but our unconscious mind may always be thinking about them.

This week on "Take Care," Shankar Vedantam, a science correspondent for NPR who focuses on human behavior and social sciences, explains what he calls the hidden brain and his work on the topic. Vedantam is the host of the NPR podcast "The Hidden Brain," which has explored topics such as unbearable boredom, the art of forgery, and what drives romantic relationships besides love. He is also the author of the book, "The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives."

A variety of new reconstructive and minimally invasive treatments are being used to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children.

Upstate University Hospital Urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky describes how he created a surgical procedure to restore a damaged urethra -- the tube through which urine leaves the body -- using a patient’s own tissue and avoiding the need for a tube implant.

Alex Proimos / flickr

One complaint about today's medical system is that treatment can seem impersonal. The idea of concierge medicine tries to combat this by charging a monthly fee to allow doctors to take fewer patients and provide more individual focus. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tom Blue, executive director of the American Academy of Private Physicians, about concierge or private medicine.

Christopher Brown / Flickr

If you were asked what the best place for your cell phone is, you might say your pocket. But a recent study has shown keeping your cell phone on your person may be connected to certain types of cancer.

This week on “Take Care,” journalist Dina Fine Maron shares the findings of this study. Maron’s article, “Major Cell Phone Radiation Study Reignites Cancer Questions,” appeared in Scientific Americanin May 2016. Maron is an award winning journalist, the health and medicine editor for Scientific American, and is a contributor to the publication's podcasts and Instant Egghead video series.

How to make healthy life changes from tiny habits

Aug 13, 2016
Nathan Rupert / Flickr

When it comes to making a change in our life, such as reducing stress or losing weight, it can seem difficult. But if we broke it down into small steps that eventually turned that change into an everyday routine, it might not seem so scary.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. B.J. Fogg tells us about this new theory he calls “Tiny Habits:” a model he’s created for human behavior change, guided by research and design. Fogg is a psychologist and innovator who directs the persuasive tech lab at Stanford University, is the author of “Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do,” and has been selected by Fortune Magazine as one of the “10 Gurus You Should Know.”

How tiny habits can lead to lasting change

Aug 12, 2016

Change is hard. And if you're trying to make a healthy change -- like losing weight or quitting smoking -- the challenge may seem monumental. This week, WRVO's health and wellness show features an interview with B.J. Fogg, A Stanford University psychologist and innovator. He says the secret to lasting change is developing changes in your behavior, which he calls tiny habits.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

It’s been a long time coming, but the town of Orleans, in Jefferson County, is on its way to fresh drinking water. The state announced this week they will provide the town with $3 million to help build a pipe to bring clean water to homes from Alexandria Bay.

Jefferson County Legislator Phil Reed said he thought he’d never see the day when Orleans, a tiny town between Clayton and Alexandria Bay, would finally get help, 

“Because we kept hearing from people, maybe next year, maybe next year, maybe next year. It was very frustrating to say the least," Reed said.

Gordon Lew / Flickr

This is the time of year health officials recommend families make sure children’s vaccinations are up to date so they can go to school in September. This year, there is one new requirement change in New York state.

The new vaccination rules affect older children, according to Upstate Medical University infectious disease specialist Dr. Joe Domachowske. The required shot is first given before seventh grade, then followed up with a booster, and will protect children from the sometimes deadly form of bacterial meningitis.

Chris Potter / Flickr

You care about your health, but it can be expensive. Between doctor’s visits, co-pays, and prescription medication, the final bill can be more than you expect. But what if there was a way to make it cheaper?

This week on “Take Care,” Matthew Chaiken tells us about his new company Blink Health, and how they’re able to cut out the middle man when it comes to buying prescription drugs at the pharmacy. Chaiken co-founded Blink Health with his brother Geoffrey in 2014, and they launched the company’s website and mobile app this past February.

Mindful eating: Let your body tell you when you're full

Aug 6, 2016
Scott Kidder / Flickr

You may feel you don’t always eat because you’re hungry, but to fulfill other emotions, such as boredom, stress, sadness or anger.

Overeating can often be a result of mindless eating when we’re feeling these emotions, according to this week’s “Take Care” guest, Dr. Lynn Rossy. Rossy is the author of the book "The Mindfulness-Based Eating Solution: Proven Strategies to End Overeating, Satisfy Your Hunger, and Savor Your Life,” and is a licensed clinical psychologist for the wellness program at the University of Missouri. She is also on the board of directors for the Center for Mindful Eating.

As Jody Adams scrolled through Facebook in January, one post stuck with her. It was written from the point of view of an infant seeking someone to donate a kidney to his ailing mother.

A nurse for 12 years and the mother of six children, Adams says the idea of donating one of her healthy kidneys had never crossed her mind -- until she read that post. She didn’t want to imagine a little boy growing up without a mother, especially if she could help. It didn’t matter to her that she did not know the family.

Being mindful of your eating

Aug 5, 2016
Michelle Hurwitz / Flickr

Sometimes physical hunger isn't the only reason we choose to eat. Mindless eating, a topic we explore this week on "Take Care," can bring comfort and mask other issues.

This week on WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Lynn Rossy, a clinical psychologist at the University of Missouri's Wellness Program. Rossy helps people learn to check in with their bodies, recognize when they're full and avoid overeating.

Health insurance premiums likely to go up in New York

Aug 4, 2016
Pictures of Money / Flickr

New York State will soon release the rates it’s approved for premiums for health insurance.

Insurers filed their requests to the state earlier this year for the premiums they want to charge in 2017. In general, they asked for bigger increases than they have in the past.

But bigger increases to premiums are expected across the country. Cynthia Cox, Associate Director of Health Reform and Private Insurance at the Kaiser Family Foundation, said this expected boost is a correction of sorts.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Central New York is home to some new strategies meant to help victims of the heroin and opioid epidemic. The strategies include new kinds of support for families of victims, and for individuals recovering from overdoses.

Onondaga County’s new peer engagement specialist, Maria Sweeney, has started to make connections in central New York emergency rooms, to help individuals recovering from a drug abuse issue. She says often there is no one to offer support for recovery, once an addict is released from the hospital.

Some find art more therapeutic than words

Jul 30, 2016
David Goehring / Flickr

Even if your version of drawing is simple stick figures, you may find yourself feeling relaxed when you doodle on papers or color. Creating art has even been proven to have a therapeutic value in the medical world.

The term art therapy was coined in the 1940s, and today is applied in a variety of settings to aid both children and adults in expressing and releasing trauma. This week on “Take Care,” international art therapy expert, Cathy Malchiodi gives us an insight to art therapy and how it works. Malchiodi is a research psychologist, art therapist, and clinical counselor. She is also the founder and director of the Trauma-Informed Practices and Expressive Arts Therapy Institute, and is the president of Art Therapy Without Borders.

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