Health

7:01pm

Sun June 8, 2014
Health

Changes needed in cancer care system to take care of survivors

Spectrum Health Flickr

While someone may successfully fight off a cancer diagnosis, the battle usually doesn’t end there. Cancer survivorship brings with it a number of different issues that may inhibit a person’s ability to return back to a normal life.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Patricia Ganz discusses issues surrounding cancer survivorship. Dr. Ganz is a medical oncologist and director of the UCLA Livestrong Cancer Survivorship Center of Excellence, is on the faculty at the UCLA School of Medicine, and was a co-founder of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Ganz.

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7:00pm

Sun June 8, 2014
Health

Can it! Preserving summer's fresh fruits and vegetables

chotda

Berries, cucumbers and green beans oh my! If you love the freshness of summer produce, you might want to try canning fresh fruits and vegetables so you can enjoy them all year long. And now’s the time to start planning your canning project.

This week on “Take Care,” Amy Jeanroy, author of “Canning and Preserving for Dummies,” discusses the many ways beginning canners can get started.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

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9:12am

Sat June 7, 2014
Health

This week: progress against cancer; a new tool for diagnosing lung cancer

Cancer can be brought under control in this century, the leader of the American Cancer Society said during a recent trip to Syracuse. More advocacy is key, said John Seffrin, the society’s chief executive officer.

“We have to have people speak up and say, ‘we need more money for research,’ ‘we need to insure that people are protected from second-hand smoke,’ and ‘we need to make sure that if someone has cancer, they get the care they need,’” Seffrin said.

Already, medical science knows how to prevent more than half of all cancers from occurring, Seffrin said.

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6:31am

Fri June 6, 2014
Health

New York working towards statewide health records system

Dr. Dan Mitchell, a psychologist at the North Country Children's Clinic in Watertown. (file photo)
Joanna Richards NCPR

Hospitals have been working for years to digitize patient medical records, but now New York state is expanding a system to centralize the record-keeping of multiple hospitals.

A patient’s medical history may be in the computer at their primary care doctor’s office. And their records may be digitized at the hospital they’ve been treated at, "however, many of those systems can’t easily or fluently communicate with one another," said Dr. Rainu Kaushal, who chairs the Weill Cornell Medical College’s healthcare policy program.

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5:34am

Fri June 6, 2014
Health

Cancer survivorship brings its own set of issues

While more Americans are being diagnosed with cancer now, more patients are being cured or living chronically with the disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Patricia Ganz, an oncologist and co-founder of the national coalition for cancer survivorship. Dr. Ganz discusses the many health issues that cancer survivors face, and how the medical community is working to address them.

Lorraine Rapp: When we use the term survivor, who are we talking about? Who is included in that group?

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11:37am

Thu June 5, 2014
Health

Schumer wants to increase number of doctors nationwide

Sen. Charles Schumer. (File photo)
Ellen Abbott WRVO

Sen. Charles Schumer wants to increase the number of primary care physicians in the United States, particularly in rural areas like upstate New York.

Schumer says he is proposing a revised version of the "Resident Physician Shortage Act," which would increase the number of Medicare-supported physician residency slots by 15,000 over the next five years.

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6:52am

Thu June 5, 2014
Health

New bill honors Vietnam vet that died from Agent Orange exposure

Alice Hackett, left, with Rep. Dan Maffei discussing Hackett's late husband, Larry, who died of a cancer likely caused by exposure to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Rep. Dan Maffei (D-Syracuse) has introduced a new bill to compensate Vietnam War veterans sickened by the chemical Agent Orange he says is more comprehensive than previous efforts.

Maffei's bill is named by Larry Hackett, who died in 2006, more than three decades after his service in the army.

Hackett was exposed to Agent Orange while serving in 1968-69. He died from a cancer likely caused by the exposure, at the age of 58. 

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5:12pm

Wed June 4, 2014
Health

Health forum: childhood nutrition and physical fitness

Lorraine Rapp WRVO

This forum will air on Sunday, June 15 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. Listen locally on your radio, on your smart phone or tablet device, or online.

Keeping children healthy sounds like it's something that should be everyone's goal but how to keep America's youth healthy can be very controversial.

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7:12pm

Sun June 1, 2014
Health

From Hoffman to high schools, heroin use is on the rise

Wikipedia Commons

Two years ago, the use and abuse of drugs called bath salts seemed to be in the news every day. This year, it’s heroin. The number of heroin deaths is on the rise in a staggering way. But why has this drug that’s been around for more than 100 years experiencing a resurgence now?

Click 'Read More ' to hear our interview with J. David Goodman.

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7:01pm

Sun June 1, 2014
Health

How the sun and you car can create a dangerous situation

Credit WRVO

It’s summertime. It’s hot. Your car has been parked in the blazing sunshine all day. You get in and the seats feel like they’re burning your legs and the steering wheel is untouchable. You may think of it as uncomfortable, an inconvenience. But a car’s interior can reach a temperature high enough to be dangerous.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Jan Null.

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4:42pm

Fri May 30, 2014
Health

This week: reducing complications in diabetes

The sharp reduction in diabetic complications is encouraging news for more than 21 million Americans who have been diagnosed with the disease. Federal researchers recently showed about 2/3 fewer heart attacks, 50 percent fewer strokes and amputations, and 30 percent fewer incidents of kidney failure among people with diabetes over the past two decades.

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5:34am

Fri May 30, 2014
Health

Why heroin use has become an epidemic

Use of the illegal narcotic heroin is on the rise across the nation and in New York state. In the last decade, the number of people hooked on heroin is estimated to have doubled. And it is claiming lives from actor Philip Seymour Hoffman to SUNY Oswego students. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with The New York Times reporter J. David Goodman, who has reported extensively on the causes and effects of the heroin epidemic.

Lorraine Rapp: Why do you think there is a rise in heroin use? What’s behind that?

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7:33am

Thu May 29, 2014
Health

Narcan use evolves as heroin, opioid overdoses increase

ACR Health's Prevention Director Erin Bortel holds a vial of Narcan, which could be used to save someone suffering from a drug overdose. (file photo)
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The recent spike in opioid abuse cases in central New York and across the country has people discussing how to get their hands on Narcan, also known as naloxone, a drug that can be quickly administered in an emergency to reverse the effects of a heroin overdose.

Dr. Jerry Emmons is the medical director for the emergency department at Oswego Hospital. He says Narcan used to be a drug seen only in hospitals, but has made its way into the hands of first responders.

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7:13am

Wed May 28, 2014
Health

ACR Health trying to expand nutritional education program

ACR Health Executive Director Michael Crinnin paints a red line down S. Salina Street as part of the outreach effort.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

ACR Health in Syracuse is hoping a successful nutrition program can be expanded to serve others in the community, but right now its nutritional education program currently only has funding to serve clients with HIV/AIDS.

Brian Cowden, 50, has been living with HIV since he was 19. On medication to control the disease, Cowden says he never felt good, complaining of gastrointestinal problems, migraines, sleep issues. But after joining ACR Health’s nutritional program, that all went away.

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7:52pm

Tue May 27, 2014
Health

Syracuse moves to ban smoking in city parks

Dale M Moore Flickr

Syracuse lawmakers are moving to ban smoking in city parks. And that includes some popular downtown hangout spots.

An ordinance brought up by the Common Council’s new health committee would prohibit smoking on any land managed by the Syracuse parks department. That includes around the fountains in Columbus Circle and Clinton Square and Hanover Squares.

The committee is also putting forward a measure to discourage smoking on sidewalks.

Councilor Khalid Bey says the city won’t be able to stop everyone from smoking in parks, "but the effort, I think, is warranted."

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5:37am

Tue May 27, 2014
Health

Syracuse hospitals invest in electronic medical records systems

SUNY Upstate Medical University
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Electronic medical records are becoming the norm at Syracuse-area hospitals. St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center and SUNY Upstate Medical University each took milestone steps this month into the digital world.

Hospital staff and patients at the Golisano Children’s Hospital have been using a computerized software system to track medical records since March. With Upstate’s Community Campus coming on board earlier this month, the teaching hospital in Syracuse now has fully implemented an electronic medical records system in all phases of care, according to hospital CEO John McCabe.

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2:51pm

Fri May 23, 2014
Health

This week: trauma services, spiritual care and health screenings

This week on Healthlink on Air: we hear from Dr. Tamer Ahmed, medical director of pediatric trauma services and Steve Adkisson, the pediatric trauma program manager. They'll cover the resources and capabilities of Upstate University Hospital's trauma center.

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7:13am

Fri May 23, 2014
Health

Gebbie Clinic at Syracuse University celebrates 40 years of changing lives

Ellen Abbott WRVO

For the last 40 years, the Gebbie Speech, Language Hearing Clinic at Syracuse University has been making a difference in the lives of people with speech and hearing problems across central New York. This weekend, the clinic will celebrate its 40th anniversary with the grand opening of new facilities, while showcasing the work they’ve done.

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7:19am

Wed May 21, 2014
Health

Albany not ready for crude oil accident

Crude oil train moves past a children's playground in Albany.
Jenna Flanagan Innovation Trail

Albany County officials recently tried to reassure the public over concerns about the crude oil trains that travel through the city. Officials have acknowledged the trains pose a significant risk but they also admit that depending on the nature of an accident, there’s little they can do.

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6:51am

Tue May 20, 2014
Health

Ultrasound tool could save lives in an emergency

Joseph Wlostowski uses a portable ultrasound device on a volunteer during a training session.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

Some emergency medical service personnel in New York state have started using technology that lets them take ultrasounds during emergency situations.

Joseph Wlostowski, a clinical educator for Mercy Flight Central is showing EMS professionals in Syracuse how a small portable ultrasound device can be used by first responders to identify life threatening injuries before getting patients to the hospital.

“It’s a tablet, a PC, the size of an iPad," Wlostowski said. "Currently at Mercy Flight Central, we are employing them on our aircraft.”

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6:04am

Mon May 19, 2014
Health

Opioid drug industry often targets middle schoolers, expert says

Abuse of heroin and opioids is something that often starts in adolescence, according to SUNY Upstate Medical Center addiction expert Dr. Brian Johnson. He said the illegal drug industry begins targeting middle schoolers, so they become addicted by the time they’re out of high school.

“The industry wants to recruit children,” Johnson said. “It’s a pediatric disease. By the time some of these kids get to college, the college [health care providers] say they’ve had this addiction for several years and it’s entrenched.”

He said one way to deal with this is to be more aware.

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7:01pm

Sun May 18, 2014
Health

Answer to preventing illness may be in Vitamin D

Shezamm

Vitamin D is the vitamin most often associated with sunshine, but could it also be used to prevent cancer and heart disease?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University and chief of preventative medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, discusses how clinical trials could prove that Vitamin D could help prevent diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and cancer.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joann Manson.

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7:00pm

Sun May 18, 2014
Health

Sneezing more? Blame the 'pollen vortex'

dawnzy58

April showers may bring May flowers, but May flowers bring something that millions dread every year—pollen, the nemesis of allergy sufferers everywhere.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Linda Cox discusses why this year’s allergy season may be more difficult than most. Dr. Cox is an allergist and immunologist from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and is also president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Linda Cox.

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5:34am

Fri May 16, 2014
Health

'Polar vortex' may be causing a 'pollen vortex' this spring

The polar vortex is a term many of us learned for the first time this winter. But what you may not know is that the cold, long winter could be the reason so many people are sneezing right now. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Linda Cox, an allergist and immunologist who is president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, about what's being called the "pollen vortex."

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about a long and severe winter that sets us up for an extreme allergy season?

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11:00am

Thu May 15, 2014
Health

This week: mastectomy -- one procedure, various approaches

We'll hear from a surgeon at Upstate Medical University, Dr. Prashant Upadhyaya, with expertise in plastic surgery and breast care. Upadhyaya explains the various surgical techniques and the options available to women, like having breast reconstruction surgery as part of a mastectomy.

"A lot of patients now actually wake up with their breast intact," says Dr. Upadhyaya.

Also on the program this week: an update on a new cystic fibrosis drug. Plus, food safety advice for mothers-to-be.

7:00pm

Sun May 11, 2014
Health

Debunk or da truth: getting to the bottom of medical myths

Credit Sheree Zielke / Flickr

You've heard about it for years and you've come to accept it as fact, but is it backed by medical science or is a story repeated so often that it's taken on a veneer of truth? We pick apart medical facts from health and wellness urban legends in our segment "Debunk or da Truth." We ask the experts and come up with an answer you can trust. Here are some of the myths we've been busting lately:

The earworm

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6:59pm

Sun May 11, 2014
Health

New risk factor for head, neck cancers and how it could impact screening and diagnosis

Some rights reserved AJ Cann

Any diagnosis of cancer can be scary. But cancers of the head and neck bring unique challenges because of the importance of this region to the body. These cancers can impact a patient’s ability to speak, swallow or breathe.

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4:00pm

Fri May 9, 2014
Health

This week: experiencing and living through a stroke

Onondaga County Undersheriff Warren Darby at this year's St. Patrick's Day parade.
Susan Kahn

Onondaga County Undersheriff Warren Darby shares details of the stroke he suffered when a capillary burst in his brain last summer.

Neurologist Dr. Gene Latorre was part of the team that helped care for Darby when he arrived at Upstate University Hospital. Latorre explains the types of stroke and treatment options available.

Then, what to do for varicose veins, and our regular feature -- a "Check Up from the Neck Up."

5:30am

Fri May 9, 2014
Health

Head and neck cancers: risk, diagnosis and treatment

A cancer diagnosis is never welcome. But cancers of the head and neck can be particularly difficult to diagnose and treat. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. David Pfister, the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about the risk factors for these types of cancer.

Lorraine Rapp:  What are the most common forms of cancer that appear in the head and neck regions?

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7:01pm

Sun May 4, 2014
Health

Risk: Why 24-hour news, the Internet have us afraid of things we shouldn't be afraid of

Lachlan Rogers flickr

You caught an item on the news about toxic chemicals on cash register receipts. You think about the risks of handling receipts over your double cheeseburger at lunch as you step outside for a quick smoke break. What's wrong with this picture? Bad eating habits, tobacco consumption, and you're worried about dying from register receipts? We know fast food and smoking are bad for us, yet we focus on other perceived threats to our health and well-being.

This week on Take Care, journalist David Ropeik discusses how we often view risk through a distorted lens. Ropeik has taught this subject at the Harvard School of Public Health, and has written about it for The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today and Nova. He is the author of “How Risky Is It, Really? Why Our Fears Don't Always Match the Facts.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with David Ropeik.

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