Health

7:01pm

Sun June 23, 2013
Health

Lessons for living

Enidanc Flickr

In the age of the Internet, when was the last time you sought out an elder for advice? In a recent survey in the United Kingdom, nine out of 10 elders said they were being overlooked for advice from their grandchildren.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Karl Pillemer, a professor of human development at the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University and a professor of gerontology at the Weill Cornell Medical College. In 2004, he founded The Legacy Project for which he collected practical advice for living from over 1,000 senior citizens across the nation. The project led to his book “30 Lessons for Living: Tried and True Advice from the Wisest Americans.”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Karl Pillemer.

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7:00pm

Sun June 23, 2013
Health

How to avoid Lyme disease

John Tann Flickr

Lyme disease is no longer just a risk for those “outdoorsy” people. Now if you’re gardening, playing in the backyard or outside at all, you can be at risk for Lyme disease. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Cynthia Morrow, Onondaga County Health Commissioner, about the increased risk of Lyme disease in the area.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Cynthia Morrow.

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9:44am

Fri June 21, 2013
Health

Looking for signs of Lyme disease: An interview with Cynthia Morrow

John Tann Flickr

Lyme disease is on the rise in many parts of the country -- including right here in central and northern New York. But what is this disease and how does it spread?

Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show, "Take Care," spoke with Onondaga County Health Commissioner Dr. Cynthia Morrow about how to recognize the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease.

Lorraine Rapp: How concerned should we be?

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7:01pm

Sun June 16, 2013
Health

Does an aspirin a day really keep the doctor away?

Curtis Gregory Perry Flickr

A growing number of doctors recommend a daily aspirin to patients who have cardiovascular disease. But many patients still have questions about who should be taking aspirin, and new research about the benefits of aspirin are still being conducted,

This week, “Take Care” speaks with Dr. Charles Hennekens, the world’s leading authority on aspirin research in cardiovascular health. He was the first to demonstrate that aspirin prevents a first heart attack, and the first to discover the life-saving properties of aspirin, both for patients experiencing heart attacks as well as heart attack survivors. He’s held the distinction of being the third most widely cited medical researcher in the world for over a decade.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Charles Hennekens.

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7:00pm

Sun June 16, 2013
Health

Keeping food safe in the summer sun & heat

Mark H. Anbinder Flickr

Summer means dining al fresco, picnics and grilling out. But how does all this outdoor activity affect your food? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

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9:46am

Fri June 14, 2013
Health

Weighing the risks and benefits of a daily aspirin

More and more doctors are recommending their patients take a daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes. And recently, new studies have suggested aspirin might help with cancer prevention, as well. But why does aspirin help? And who really should be taking it? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," spoke with the physician who first demonstrated the life-saving properties of aspirin, Dr. Charles Hennekens.

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7:01pm

Sun June 9, 2013
Health

Sneezing and sniffling your way through the seasons

Credit Leah Landry / WRVO

Dry eyes? Itchy skin? Sneezing and coughing every other second? Yes, it’s allergy season for over 14 million Americans. But what’s the science behind these summer pests? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Juan Sotomayor, an expert on allergies, asthma, immunology and pulmonary disease who has his own private practice in Syracuse.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Juan Sotomayor.

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7:00pm

Sun June 9, 2013
Health

Apps for travelers

Phil Roeder Flickr

Before you go on vacation you take out the trash, check the weather, pack a suitcase, but are you updating your smartphone? This week on “Take Care,” we spoke to About.com senior travel writer Nancy Parode on how smartphone applications can help travelers with everything from finding an urgent care to overcoming jet lag.

Click "Read More" to hear Nancy Parode's take on traveling apps.

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5:34am

Fri June 7, 2013
Health

The science of allergies

While most people in central and northern New York welcome spring and summer, this time of year can be miserable for allergy sufferers. But many people who sniffle and sneeze through the seasons don't know much about the science of allergies.

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10:24am

Thu June 6, 2013
Health

Upcoming topics: allergies, apps to keep you healthy and the leading authority on aspirin

Leah Landry WRVO

Coming up on Take Care, we'll talk with an allergist to see if there's any relief in sight for seasonal sufferers. With symptoms like itchy eyes, a runny nose and a scratchy throat, the living isn't easy for those with allergies the summer.

Plus, a national travel writer gives advice on easy ways to stay healthy while you're away from home.

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8:59am

Mon June 3, 2013
Health

Anti-cancer groups want candy-flavored cigars banned

Audio Pending...

Anti-cancer groups are seeking to ban the sale of fruit and chocolate flavored cigars in New York state that they say are target to children.

The products include chocolate, strawberry and grape flavored cigars, which sell for under a dollar at common convenience stores. Also available on line are gummy bear and cookie dough flavored chewing tobacco and other related products.

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7:01pm

Sun June 2, 2013
Health

The difficult decision of having a preventative mastectomy

Ann H. Partridge, MD, MPH
Credit Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / dana-farber.org

Last month, when actress Angelina Jolie announced that she decided to undergo surgery to have her breasts removed to reduce her chances of developing breast cancer, public attention has been focused on prophylactic mastectomies, a procedure which has increased in popularity in recent years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview about prophylactic mastectomies.

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7:00pm

Sun June 2, 2013
Health

How to stay healthy while traveling

Daniel Chodusov Flickr

Be prepared: that’s the best way to stay well while you travel this summer. Whether that means bringing your prescription medications, looking online or checking with a doctor before you go, there are important steps to take in order to be safe and healthy when you take a vacation.

This week on “Take Care,” an interview with travel writer Nancy Parode on tips for how to stay healthy while traveling. She writes about senior travel for About.com and has written about domestic and international travel -- everything from cruises to road-trips with her grandkids.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Nancy Parode.

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8:40am

Fri May 31, 2013
Health

Why more women are choosing to have prophylactic mastectomies

When actress Angelina Jolie decided to have her breasts surgically removed to prevent her from getting breast cancer, it brought unprecedented attention to the growing trend of prophylactic mastectomies. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO’s health and wellness show, “Take Care,” spoke with Dr. Ann Partridge, a medical oncologist and Harvard professor, about why more women are electing to have this surgery.

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5:25am

Thu May 30, 2013
Health

AIDS agency to offer services for patients with other chronic diseases

The agency that has helped victims of HIV/AIDS for the past 30 years in central New York will soon be taking on a new responsibility. AIDS Community Resources will be a foot soldier in a revamped Medicaid system in New York state.

In the next month or so, ARC will begin offering case management services for Medicaid eligible individuals who don't necessarily have AIDS, but who have any chronic health issue.

It'll mean a name change for AIDS Community Resources, but more importantly, Executive Director Michael Crinnen says it will allow the agency do what it does best -- coordinate care for sufferers of a chronic disease, and hopefully keeping them out of the emergency room.

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7:36am

Wed May 29, 2013
Health

Stricter ban and penalties proposed on synthetic drugs

Lee Livermore, Public Education Coordinator at the Upstate Posion Control Center, holds up new brands of synthetic drugs.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

New York lawmakers have introduced new legislation to expand the ban on synthetic drugs and increase penalties in the state by addressing the mislabeling and chemical swapping of the drugs.

Synthetic drugs, often known as "bath salts" and sold under various other names, in New York have been banned since August last year following multiple cases of violent overdoses.

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4:08pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Health

Mobile app prototype targets readmission rates, aims to lower ER and insurance costs

A new mobile app is expected to help improve the quality of patient care across the nation.  A team of University at Buffalo students have created it to help reduce hospital readmission rates.

Currently in the prototype stage, the “Discharge Roadmap” app will help patients once they leave the hospital but allowing them and their caregivers to fully participate in the discharge planning process.

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7:01pm

Sun May 26, 2013
Health

Patients, privacy and employers

Credit Timmy Gunz / Flickr

Your employer is concerned about rising insurance costs and you don’t want to see your benefits slashed, so they ask you to participate in some medical tests and enroll in a wellness plan. If you and your fellow employees participate, you’ll qualify for discounts on your premium and deductible.

Is this an invasion of privacy? Where do these records go and who will see them? Will your colleagues know if you didn’t participate in the wellness program?

This week, “Take Care” interviews Dr. Deborah Peel, a physician, and a leading advocate for patients’ rights and the founder of Patient Privacy Rights, a bipartisan coalition for patient privacy. Dr. Peel says she understands the need to have healthy, happy employees but does not agree with what she calls the “short-sighted” solution.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Deborah Peel.

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7:00pm

Sun May 26, 2013
Health

My aching back - a growing problem

Eighty percent – that’s the number of adults who will experience back pain sometime in their life. And the cost of treating back problems is rising consistently.

This week on “Take Care,” a conversation with Wayne Rath, a physical therapy expert in the treatment and prevention of back and neck pain. He has been recognized as one of the twenty most influential physical therapists in orthopedic physical therapy  and was a clinical assistant professor in the physical therapy school at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Wayne Rath.

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6:59pm

Sun May 26, 2013
Health

To the farmers market you go

Joe Beasley Flickr

According to Ben Vitale, the secret to successfully shopping at a farmers market comes down to one simple statement: “Know your farmer, know your food.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Ben Vitale.

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5:42am

Fri May 24, 2013
Health

Looking for healthy food choices at farmers markets

As more and more people become interested in trying to eat locally produced foods, New York state's farmers markets are also becoming more popular. But how can you make sure what you buy at the farmers market is really healthier than what you might get at the supermarket? Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care" asked Ben Vitale, who oversees the Central New York Regional Market Authority, a year-round farmers market in Syracuse. Vitale is also a farmer himself.

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11:49am

Thu May 23, 2013
Health

Future topics: patient privacy rights, the farmers market and traveling healthy

Justin Sewell Flickr

Join us this Sunday on Take Care for a discussion on patient privacy rights. What happens when you surrender privacy for lower insurance premiums at work? A national patient's rights advocate warns us of the risks involved.

Then, got back pain? As many as 80 percent of Americans do at some point in their lives. A leading back expert explains how to minimize back pain and offers tips on prevention. Plus- coming soon to a farmer's market near you: tender lettuce, sun-warmed strawberries, and red ripe tomatoes. Get expert tips for smart shopping from a local producer who heads up a year-round farmer's market.

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7:00pm

Sun May 19, 2013
Health

Typing, texting and carpal tunnel

Orthopedic hand specialist, John F. Fatti, M.D.

When it comes to preventing carpal tunnel syndrome, the key may be found in one simple saying, according to Dr. John Fatti: “Let your brain listen to your hand.”

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Fatti explains how carpal tunnel syndrome happens and how to avoid it. Dr. Fatti is founder of the Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists Hand and Wrist Center. His work in the field of upper extremity care has been featured in several of the nation’s top medical journals.

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6:59pm

Sun May 19, 2013
Health

Fluoridated water faces backlash, but experts still favor it

Credit University of Rochester Medical Center / urmc.rochester.edu

For decades, communities across the United States have fluoridated their water in the name of public health. Many studies have shown that fluoride strengthens and improves teeth and reduces the incidence of tooth decay. But some communities have decided against providing fluoridated water for a number of reasons. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. William Bowen explains why he believes fluoridating public water is still a good idea.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Bowen.

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9:04am

Fri May 17, 2013
Health

Fluoride for all? Why communities do and don't add it to their water

In the last several years, about 140 communities across the country have decided to stop added fluoride to their water supplies. In November, the village of Pulaski's water board voted to no long put fluoride in their water. Earlier this week, the Watertown City Council heard arguments that they should do the same thing. Communities like these worry the element could be harming their citizens, corroding their pipes or feel like it's just a government intrusion. This trend comes despite dentists and the Centers for Disease Control calling fluoridation of water a major public health advancement of the last century. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's weekly health and wellness show "Take Care" recently spoke about this controversial issue with Dr. William Bowen, a dental health expert and professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center, who has also worked for the Food and Drug Administration and the CDC.

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11:36am

Tue May 14, 2013
Health

Cynthia Morrow on the Campbell Conversations

When it comes to health, what does the region do well, and what does it do poorly? What are the next frontiers in making the community healthier? In this edition of the Campbell Conversations, Onondaga County Health Commissioner Cynthia Morrow reflects on recent statistics about the county's health, discusses different approaches that communities and government can take toward improving health, and speculates about possible futures.

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4:54pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Health

Hospitals fear the unknown when it comes to the Affordable Care Act

Kathryn Ruscitto, president of St. Joseph's Hospital, is presented an award by Richard Umbdenstock, president of the American Hospital Association

In a little more than six months, the Affordable Care Act will change the lay of the land for healthcare in this country. For hospitals, it continues changes that started a decade ago, says Richard Umbdenstock, the president of the American Hospital Association, who was in Syracuse Monday.

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7:01pm

Sun May 12, 2013
Food Labeling

100% Natural: What's in a name?

Marion Nestle is Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health; and Professor of Sociology at New York University. Her degrees include a Ph.D. in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition, both from the University of California, Berkeley.
Credit foodpolitics.com

When it comes to going to the supermarket, Dr. Marion Nestle wants you to keep one thing in mind:

“The purpose of the entire layout of the supermarket is to sell food products. There’s a sales pitch with every single product, every single layout.”

This week, “Take Care” interviews Nestle, a professor in nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University. She is the author of many books on the topic of food labeling, including Food Politics, which is currently celebrating its 10th anniversary of publication.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Marion Nestle.

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11:51am

Fri May 10, 2013
Health

Rally hopes to shed light on diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease

John Tann Flickr

Victims of Lyme disease converge on Albany today for an awareness rally meant to focus attention on the tick-borne disease, that can attack a person's skin, nervous system, heart or joints. Over 95,000 cases have been reported to the New York State Health Department since Lyme disease became reportable in 1986, including hundreds in central New York.

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10:44am

Fri May 10, 2013
Health

The importance of food labels

As more Americans try to eat healthier, consumers are trying to find out more information about the food they purchase at the grocery store. And that means reading the labels. But terms like "organic" and "all natural" can be confusing. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness program "Take Care," recently spoke to NYU professor of sociology and nutrition, Dr. Marion Nestle about how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates food labels and how consumers have demanded changes in those rules.

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