Health

4:00pm

Fri May 9, 2014
Health

This week: experiencing and living through a stroke

Onondaga County Undersheriff Warren Darby at this year's St. Patrick's Day parade.
Susan Kahn

Onondaga County Undersheriff Warren Darby shares details of the stroke he suffered when a capillary burst in his brain last summer.

Neurologist Dr. Gene Latorre was part of the team that helped care for Darby when he arrived at Upstate University Hospital. Latorre explains the types of stroke and treatment options available.

Then, what to do for varicose veins, and our regular feature -- a "Check Up from the Neck Up."

5:30am

Fri May 9, 2014
Health

Head and neck cancers: risk, diagnosis and treatment

A cancer diagnosis is never welcome. But cancers of the head and neck can be particularly difficult to diagnose and treat. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. David Pfister, the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about the risk factors for these types of cancer.

Lorraine Rapp:  What are the most common forms of cancer that appear in the head and neck regions?

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7:01pm

Sun May 4, 2014
Health

Risk: Why 24-hour news, the Internet have us afraid of things we shouldn't be afraid of

Lachlan Rogers flickr

You caught an item on the news about toxic chemicals on cash register receipts. You think about the risks of handling receipts over your double cheeseburger at lunch as you step outside for a quick smoke break. What's wrong with this picture? Bad eating habits, tobacco consumption, and you're worried about dying from register receipts? We know fast food and smoking are bad for us, yet we focus on other perceived threats to our health and well-being.

This week on Take Care, journalist David Ropeik discusses how we often view risk through a distorted lens. Ropeik has taught this subject at the Harvard School of Public Health, and has written about it for The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today and Nova. He is the author of “How Risky Is It, Really? Why Our Fears Don't Always Match the Facts.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with David Ropeik.

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7:00pm

Sun May 4, 2014
Health

The bug-eat-bug world of organic gardening

clara bonnet flickr

Good night, don’t let the pest bugs bite… your plants, that is. Pests can be one problem affecting gardens, but it’s not the only thing to look out for, especially when it comes to organic gardening.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy talks about the basics of organic gardening. Jeanroy is a gardening expert, and covers herb gardening for the how-to website About.com. She’s the author of Canning and Preserving for Dummies, now in its second edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

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11:14am

Fri May 2, 2014
Health

This week: new research in kidney cancer

According to research published in Urologic Oncology, some kidney cancer patients have better long-term survival odds when part of the kidney is removed, compared to patients who have the entire organ removed.

We'll discuss the findings and other treatment options for people with kidney cancer. More than 65,000 Americans were diagnosed with kidney cancer in 2013.

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7:15am

Tue April 29, 2014
Health

Onondaga County Medical Society calls health program realignment a poor decision

The Onondaga County Medical Society has taken an official stance against the proposed realignment of the Human Services Division of Onondaga County's government. The physicians organization believes the plan to take the Maternal Health and Child Wellness programs out of the purview of the Health Department is a bad move.

The organization has six major concerns about the move, says society treasurer Dr. Richard Beers. He says it starts with the unintended consequences of changing the relationship doctors already have with health care providers involved in the county’s programs.

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7:01pm

Sun April 27, 2014
Health

Before moving, seniors should ask these questions

The Pointe at Kilpatrick Flickr

After raising kids in the family home and living there for decades, it may be hard for aging adults to consider a life anywhere else. When debilitating illness or a terminal condition requires advanced care, options are limited. But for the senior who moves by choice, that next step can provide a wider variety of living options.  When should we be making that decision, and what should we look for when we plan for that next phase of our lives?

This week on Take Care, Barbara Dopyera Daley, a social gerontologist and elder life advocate in Syracuse,  explains a variety of housing options for seniors. Daley holds a master's degree in gerontology and public policy and consults with organizations, individuals and their families on issues related to care and aging.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barbara Dopyera Daley.

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7:00pm

Sun April 27, 2014
Health

Fibromyalgia -- what is known and unknown

Mike Smail Flickr

Imagine being in a large amount of pain and not knowing the cause. Or, having a disorder that’s not recognized by a significant amount of medical professionals. This cloud of uncertainty hangs over the millions that suffer from fibromyalgia, a disorder with an unknown cause and limited treatments.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Robert Shmerling talks about the controversial disorder known as fibromyalgia. Dr. Shmerling is a Harvard Medical School professor and clinical chief of rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Shmerling.

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5:34am

Fri April 25, 2014
Health

What seniors should consider when deciding whether to move

Moving out of a home and into senior housing may be a difficult decision. But with a wide variety of options available today, seniors can plan ahead with these choices in mind. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Barbara Dopyera Daley, a social gerontologist and elder life advocate in Syracuse. Daley discusses how to determine the right time to consider senior housing options.

Lorraine Rapp: When is the ideal time to be thinking about making this big move in one’s life?

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5:33am

Thu April 24, 2014
Health

String of heroin overdoses stresses prevention drug training

ACR Director of Prevention Services Erin Bortel holds up a vial of Narcan, a drug that can prevent opioid overdose.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

A spate of heroin overdoses last week in Syracuse has created a more urgent tone for one community organization’s program meant to fight overdoses. The Opioid Overdose Prevention Program run by ACR Health in Syracuse hopes to prevent stories like this in the future.

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7:14am

Fri April 18, 2014
Health

This week: wilderness medicine and more

Practicing medicine in the wilderness means being able to anticipate problems and improvise solutions. Dr. Jeremy Joslin is with us this Sunday at 9 p.m. He's the director of the Wilderness and Expedition Medicine Fellowship program at Upstate Medical University.

Wilderness medicine requires "the ability to think on your feet and diagnose and treat people without various tests and studies and radiological procedures that you might have in a hospital," Joslin says.

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7:01pm

Sun April 13, 2014
Health

Death is hard, but hospice can help patients and families

dreamingofariz Flickr

Most people don't want to make plans for their own death, or for the death of their loved ones. But talking about death can assure that needs and wishes are met, and that patients are as comfortable as possible.

This week on Take Care, Amy Tucci, president and CEO of the Hospice Foundation of America, discusses how hospice care can ease the pain of death. Tucci explains how hospice care can not only help patients, but also their families.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Tucci.

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7:00pm

Sun April 13, 2014
Health

Angioplasty: How balloons can save your life

Angioplasty balloon
Denise Chan flickr

If bent the right way, a balloon can be used to make an animal. If pumped with hot air, a balloon can be used to fly. Balloons have many different functions, mostly in the realm of fun. But, balloons have also been used to save lives through a procedure known as angioplasty.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Amar Krishnaswamy discusses angioplasties. Dr. Krishnaswamy is an interventional cardiologist in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Krishnaswamy.

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6:26pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Health

This week: preventing amputations in people with diabetes and more

For people with diabetes, monitoring foot health is as important as tracking sugar levels, blood pressure and kidney function.

"If they don't have good blood supply to their foot, you can give all of the antibiotics that you want, but the antibiotics go in the blood, and the blood can't get to the foot," says Dr. Palma Shaw, a vascular surgeon at Upstate.

We'll hear how diabetes can lead to amputation and why regular podiatry appointments are suggested.

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1:18pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Health

Onondaga County: Dr. Morrow's resignation was "premature"

Dr. Cynthia Morrow, former commissioner of the Onondaga County Health Department, speaking to the county legislature's health committee.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Onondaga County's deputy executive for human services says it was "premature" for the county's health commissioner to resign.

Dr. Cynthia Morrow resigned from her role as the county's top health expert last week over the county executive's plans to reorganize child and maternal health services within county departments.

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5:34am

Fri April 11, 2014
Health

Hospice care can make death more comfortable

Nobody likes talking about death, but experts say having a conversation is an important part of making sure death is as comfortable as possible. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Amy Tucci, president and CEO of the Hospice Foundation of America. Tucci explains how hospice can help ease suffering for those who are dying and their families.

Lorraine Rapp: What are your suggestions of how to bring this up with people in your life so that you can talk about having a good death?

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4:20pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Health

Final enrollment day was busiest for state's health care exchange

March 31 was the busiest day for New York's new health insurance marketplace. It was also the final day of the six month open enrollment period.

Almost 470,000 people visited the site and 39,000 signed up on that last day, according to the state's exchange, to bring the total to 926,000 enrolled.

Those newly covered signed up for a combination of the expanded federal Medicaid program, Child Health Plus, or a private provider.

The exchange is crediting its early success in enrollment with a functioning website, something the federal exchange was plagued with.

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7:42am

Tue April 8, 2014
Health

A hard life: heroin use increases in region, strains services

Last week the Food and Drug Administration approved a prescription device that can inject a fast acting antidote to heroin and other opioid drugs. It’s the latest response to a surge in opioid abuse. Heroin use has doubled between 2007 and 2012, and it’s no longer just an urban street drug; it’s now common in small town America.

For almost 40 of his 54 years, Jerry Jones has done drugs.

"At an early age, started with pot, drinking," Jones said. "It wasn't long after that where I started using other drugs, cocaine, speed, acid. I've done every drug under the sun."

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10:48am

Mon April 7, 2014
Health

St. Joseph's Hospital responds to allegation of patient abuse

St. Joseph's hospital on Syracuse's north side.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Updated, 3:40 p.m.:

St. Joseph's Hospital is responding to allegations of misbehavior against a former doctor, saying it reacted quickly and thoroughly.

The hospital said it became aware of complaints involving inappropriate actions and vulgar language -- reportedly involving the slapping of sedated patients -- in its operating rooms in December.

The hospital faces sanctions and disciplinary actions over the charges, stemming from a federal investigation.

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7:01pm

Sun April 6, 2014
Health

More ADHD diagnoses mean more kids on medication

ADHD och ADD

Some kids have short attention spans, and can act hyper or impulsive. But do these kids all need to be medicated? Today, 3.5 million children in the United States are on medication for Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder.

This week on Take Care, Alan Schwarz, a writer for The New York Times who has reported extensively on ADHD, discusses the rise of ADHD diagnoses in children. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 11 percent of school-aged children have been diagnosed with ADHD, but according to Schwarz, some of them may be misdiagnoses.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Alan Schwarz.

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7:00pm

Sun April 6, 2014
Health

Better technology may flatline stethoscope use

Michael flickr

The stethoscope may be the most recognizable tool in healthcare. It’s used to listen to the internal sounds of the body, and can be found in almost every doctor’s office. But with the development of better technology, the stethoscope may soon become obsolete.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson discusses new stethoscope replacements. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

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11:41am

Fri April 4, 2014
Health

This week: e-cigarettes, drug dependence during pregnancy and more

Health authorities are very aware of the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes. Some think these tobacco products lure teens and young adults to the habit of smoking not only e-cigarettes but traditional cigarettes as well.

The number of high school students using e-cigarettes has doubled from 2011 to 2012. Dr. Leslie Kohman, the medical director of the Upstate Cancer Center, explains some dangers of these devices.

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5:34am

Fri April 4, 2014
Health

ADHD diagnoses rising, potentially misdiagnosed often

Diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have been rising for the past 20 years. Today, 3.5 million children in the United States are on medication for the disorder. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Alan Schwarz, a writer for The New York Times who has reported extensively on ADHD. Schwarz discusses the rise of ADHD and how it is likely being over diagnosed.

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3:34pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Health

Onondaga County reorganization plan led to Morrow resignation

Dr. Cynthia Morrow has been Onondaga County Health Commissioner for nine years.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Onondaga County’s longtime health commissioner, Dr. Cynthia Morrow, has resigned in a disagreement over a portion of the planned reorganization of the county's human service agencies.

In the proposed new iteration of the Onondaga County's structure, Executive Joanie Mahoney's administration wants maternal and child health programs, which target at-risk infants and children as well as their families, to fall under the Department of Children and Family Services, which currently focuses on child welfare.  

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10:52am

Thu April 3, 2014
Health

Onondaga County health commissioner resigns

The head of Onondaga County's health department, Dr. Cynthia Morrow, has suddenly resigned.

Morrow's resignation is effective immediately, according to Ben Dublin, a spokesman for County Executive Joanie Mahoney.

Mahoney accepted the resignation today, Dublin said.

Deputy Commissioner Michele Mignano has been appointed in her place for the interim and Dr. Morrow will stay on for a few weeks to help with the transition, Dublin said.

The county executive released this statement: 

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6:15am

Thu April 3, 2014
Health

Loss of Medicaid transport funding threatens some county public transit

http://www.cortlandtransit.8m.net/

It’s a drizzly day in Cortland. Joyce Dowd is leaning against the bus stop shelter in front of the courthouse waiting for the number 5.

Today’s like every day – Dowd catches the 2:30 bus to head about 15 miles down the road.  

"My daughter lives at the trailer park there," says Dowd. "But I go to Cincinnatus because she works at the dollar store and I go out there and see her a lot.”

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7:20am

Tue April 1, 2014
Health

With budget behind them, some lobbyists turn to passing the Women's Equality Act

Now that the state budget is in place, lawmakers can turn their attention to more controversial end-of-session issues. That means a return to one of the more contentious items that failed at the end of last year’s session; the Women’s Equality Agenda.

The Women’s Equality Agenda is a ten-point plan that deals with several women’s issues, including a call for equal pay, the end of sexual harassment in workplaces and the strengthening of human sex trafficking laws.

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5:56am

Mon March 31, 2014
Health

Upstate Hospital receives Level 1 trauma center designation

Ellen Abbott WRVO

Upstate University Hospital and the Golisano Children’s Hospital have won a Level 1 trauma center designation from the American College of Surgeons.

After a year and a half of investigations into the hospitals' adult and pediatric services, Upstate becomes the only hospital to get this Level 1 designation in New York state, since the state allowed hospitals to go after these designations two years ago.

The hospital already had the label in the eyes of New York state, but emergency department Dr. Eric Shaw says this outside award takes that up a notch.   

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7:01pm

Sun March 30, 2014
Health

Study shows equal marriages lack sexual spark

Credit Ika Ink / Flickr

If you share the chores with your spouse, the two of you have what psychologists call a "peer marriage,” an egalitarian partnership. Maybe the husband cooks, vacuums, and loads the dishwasher, and you genuinely enjoy each other's company. But what about your sex life? The answer may reveal an unexpected outcome of modern marriage.

This week on Take Care, Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author of The New York Times article “Does a More Equal Marriage Mean Less Sex?” discusses how equality in marriage can impact a couple’s sex life. Her article has triggered a national debate on why peer marriages seem to have lost that sexual spark. Gottlieb is the author of The New York Times bestseller "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough" and three other books, as well as a contributing editor for The Atlantic.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Lori Gottlieb.

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7:00pm

Sun March 30, 2014
Health

While much unknown about shingles, vaccines remain the best defense

brownpau flickr

Imagine getting a skin rash so painful that it compares to the intensity of pain associated with childbirth and kidney stones. The Center for Disease Control says that shingles can cause this kind of pain, and that one in three Americans will get it in their lifetime. Why exactly does shingles cause this kind of pain, and what is being done to prevent and treat it?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Pritish Tosh discusses the skin rash known as shingles. Dr. Tosh is assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic where he has collaborated with the Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development. He’s a leading expert on emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Tosh.

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