Health

7:07am

Thu February 13, 2014
Health

Possible treatment for Parkinson's developed upstate

Some rights reserved by ZEISS Microscopy

Researchers in upstate New York have developed a new cell therapy that could treat Parkinson’s disease, a neurological disorder which affects motor function. The study from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggests this new approach could not only halt progression of the disease, but also reverse its impact on the brain.

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3:42pm

Tue February 11, 2014
Health

Study finds healthcare providers overlooking costs

A recent study by the Journal of the American Medical Association found that, despite healthcare spending that has reached nearly $3 trillion each year in the U.S., few general medicine programs around the country are teaching new physicians to practice cost-conscious care.

A survey of nearly 300 residency programs around the U.S revealed that the vast majority of healthcare providers believe it’s their responsibility to help decrease rising costs.

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8:25am

Tue February 11, 2014
Health

Stem cell discovery sets science community abuzz

A researcher working at the University of Rochester Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Institute.
Kate O'Connell WXXI

The science community was buzzing this week with news of a breakthrough in stem cell research. Stem cells have the potential to transform into any tissue in the body, and are being explored as treatment options for trauma and degenerative diseases.

When we’re born, our cells are programmed to carry out a specific role. They automatically become muscle cells, skin cells, nerve cells, and that role can’t be changed.

But stem cells can be manipulated to become any kind of cell, offering the potential for regeneration in the body.

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7:01pm

Sun February 9, 2014
Health

Diagnostic imaging: The eye for the inside

Rob! Flickr

Like something straight out of science fiction, the use of diagnostic imaging allows doctors to “see” inside the human body without physically opening it up. X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds and MRI are some of the most common kinds, but what is the difference between all of them? What situation calls for what kind of diagnostic imaging, and is there any danger in using them?

To answer these basic questions, Dr. Scott Buckingham joins us this week on Take Care. Dr. Buckingham, of CRA Medical Imaging in Syracuse, is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology and has also had training in vascular and interventional radiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview Dr. Scott Buckingham.

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7:00pm

Sun February 9, 2014
Health

Poverty not sole indicator of food deserts

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Did you ever realize how the stores in your neighborhood influence what you eat?  If you're on a tight budget and don't own a car, your food choices are limited to items you can buy within walking distance. Fresh fruits and vegetables aren't usually available at the corner convenience store, and if they are, they're expensive. When the nearest full service market is miles away, eating healthy is a challenge. 

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Bower discusses a new study from Johns Hopkins that found racial makeup determines the food access in a neighborhood. Bower is the lead researcher for the study and also an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kelly Bower.

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6:04pm

Sun February 9, 2014
Health

Cliff Douglas on The Campbell Conversations

Cliff Douglas, left, speaks with Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher

You sometimes hear that with all we know about the dangerous health effects of cigarettes, you’d have to be crazy to smoke.  That turns out to be more true than we might realize.  In this episode of the Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher talks with tobacco control policy expert Cliff Douglas, and uncovers a variety of disturbing—and sometimes hopeful—information about our society’s tobacco use, tobacco policies, and the tobacco industry. 

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5:34am

Fri February 7, 2014
Health

Study shows access to food impacted by racial makeup of neighborhood

Poor neighborhoods in urban areas are known as food deserts, where access to grocery stores is limited. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kelly Bower of Johns Hopkins University, who recently led a study that found it isn't just poverty that is an indicator of whether or not supermarkets are readily available in a neighborhood.

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7:01pm

Sun February 2, 2014
Health

You can judge food by its packaging

Press Release Finder Flickr

We put a lot of faith in the food we buy. Every time we open up a jar of pickles, a bag of potato chips or a can of soda, we trust that that product will be safe and of a high quality. The package that food is in has a great impact on that safety and quality. And you may not realize there is actual science behind food packaging, which is quite intricate and complex.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joesph Hotchkiss talks about the science of food packaging. Hotchkiss is the director of the School of Packaging and the Center for Packaging Innovation and Sustainability at Michigan State University. He was once a science advisor in the Food and Drug Administration, and holds a Ph.D. in food chemistry.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss.

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7:00pm

Sun February 2, 2014
Health

Tips for living your best life after age 50

Dark Dwarf Flickr

Maybe you've taken your good health for granted. But once you turn 50, all bets are off. What you do during this decade will set the stage for a life of continued wellness or one of gradual but irreversible decline. But it's never too late to do the right thing for your body.

This week on Take Care, Huffington Post and AARP columnist Barbara Hannah Grufferman shares three essential tips for staying healthy after age 50. Grufferman has interviewed experts from around the field, and from her findings, she wrote a book called “The Best of Everything After 50.” She also serves as host of "The Best of Everything" on AARP's YouTube Channel.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barbara Hannah Grufferman.

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5:34am

Fri January 31, 2014
Health

Food packaging does more than protect food

Every day, American consumers rely on the cans, bottles, boxes and plastic that food is sold in to keep them safe. In fact, scientists research how food packaging can help preserve food and extend shelf life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss, director of the school of packaging at Michigan State University about the science of food packaging.

Linda Lowen: Every package protects its contents, but what is it providing protection against?

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8:00am

Wed January 29, 2014
Health

Researchers pinpoint where in the brain Alzheimer's begins

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have used high resolution imaging to show that Alzheimer’s begins in a specific part of the brain, known as a gateway to the hippocampus.

Dr. Scott Small, co-author of the study, says this particular area plays a vital role in consolidating long term memories. The discovery could help with early diagnosis of the disease, and that, he says, could lead to more effective intervention.

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3:22pm

Mon January 27, 2014
Health

American Lung Association says New York needs to spend more to help people quit smoking

Dale M Moore Flickr

New York state received mixed grades in the annual American Lung Association report card.  But the advocacy group says more can be done to help people quit the smoking habit..

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in this country, in New York state that translates to about 25,000 people who die every year from smoking-related diseases. So while the state got good grades as far as smoke free air and the nations highest cigarette tax, it got failing grades when it comes to helping people quit.  

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7:01pm

Sun January 26, 2014
Health

Brisk is better

Asela Jayarathne Flickr

The National Walkers' Health Study recently conducted the largest known study about walkers. It was administered to 40,000 different walkers, mostly middle age. Some walkers were slow and some were nearly jogging. Gretchen Reynolds joined us to talk about the findings. Reynolds is a health reporter for the New York Times and author of "The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer".

Click Read More to hear our interview with Gretchen Reynolds.

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7:00pm

Sun January 26, 2014
Health

When illness causes parent-child role reversal

MTSOfan Flickr

At the beginning of life, parents generally take care of children. But later in life, many adult children find that they become the ones who must take care of their parents. Whether that transition happens suddenly or slowly over the years, it can be difficult because the roles parents and children have played for decades are reversed.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, discusses some of the things adult children should keep in mind as they become caregivers.

Click Read More to hear our interview with Dr. Wen.

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8:34am

Sat January 25, 2014
Health

FDA reviews antibacterial soaps and washes

Some rights reserved by Arlington County

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has started a review of the safety and effectiveness of antibacterial products across a range of industries.

The first stage of the process will focus on antibacterial soaps and body washes. Despite some heavy marketing, FDA officials say very little is known about the long-term effects of these products.

In December, the administration gave manufacturers a year to prove their antibacterial soaps and washes are safe for long term daily use, and are more effective than regular soap and water in preventing illness.

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5:34am

Fri January 24, 2014
Health

Transitioning from child to caregiver

When aging parents are diagnosed with a chronic illness or terminal disease, often roles are reversed and adult children become the caregivers. The transition can be difficult, but extremely important to the parent's quality of life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, about how to deal with this stage of life.

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8:01am

Thu January 23, 2014
Health

National study finds elevated rates of cancer and neurological disease amongst IBM Endicott workers

Wanda Hudak at home in Endicott with the former IBM campus in the background.
Matt Richmond WSKG

Like many in Endicott, Wanda Hudak has a long history with IBM.

There’s a clear view of the company’s campus, now the Huron campus, from the garden in her backyard. She’s lived in Endicott her whole life, and worked at IBM as a nurse during the 1970s before becoming the town’s representative on the county legislature.

“I’m a real hard-nose 'I love Endicott' girl, ok?" Hudak said. "My dad worked in the Endicott-Johnson factory. My mom was a wonderful seamstress, made a good living doing that. I went to school at Union-Endicott.”

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7:01pm

Sun January 19, 2014
Health

Keeping an eye on aging and your sight

Wil Taylor Flickr

With age comes a variety of health issues. But what can you do if age brings conditions that impact your sight? This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Sheila West, professor and researcher at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins describes age-related eye disorders, and ways to slow and treat them.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview about age related eye disorders.

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7:00pm

Sun January 19, 2014
Health

Play, the kale of behavior

Thaddeus Stewart Flickr

That’s right, eat it up. Play has so many benefits that one play researcher describes it as the super food of behavior. Gwen Gordon is a pioneer in the field of transpersonal play. She’s worked with the MIT Media Lab, won an Emmy for children’s programming, and is currently producing the documentary “Seriously! A Movie About Play.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Gwen Gordon.

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8:12am

Fri January 17, 2014
Health

Can playing as an adult be good for you?

Eugene Kim Flickr

You may think playtime is just for children, but research is showing that spending time just playing may be good for your health as an adult. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Gwen Gordon, an expert in the scientific benefits of play.

Lorraine Rapp: What can you tell us about the actual health benefits of play?

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8:54am

Thu January 16, 2014
Health

St. Joseph's Primary Care Center on Syracuse's Westside provides one-stop shop for patients

An exam room at the expanded St. Joseph's Primary Care Center-West in Syracuse.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center has expanded it’s primary care center in one poverty stricken Syracuse neighborhood. The new center will offer a single location where patients can get many medical needs met on the city’s near Westside.

The Primary Care Center-West has been around on Gifford Street since the mid-1990s. Medical Director Luis Castro says the expansion not only quadruples the size of the facility, but creates a kind of one-stop shop for patients.

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6:24pm

Mon January 13, 2014
Health

Clinic taking steps toward financial health

The North Country Family Health Center - formerly the North Country Children's Clinic - is restructuring to ensure long-term financial stability.
Credit Joanna Richards

A clinic in Watertown that serves many needy children is taking steps toward better financial health after nearly closing abruptly in October.

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7:01pm

Sun January 12, 2014
Health

Clinical trials: How drugs get from R&D to your pharmacy

e-MagineArt.com Flickr

It takes years for the medication you find in your neighborhood pharmacy to go through research and development. But it takes something more than that for those drugs to make it to your medicine cabinet – clinical trials and people willing to participate in them.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Lindsay McNair, chief clinical research officer for WIRB-Copernicus Group, a leading independent institutional review board which provides human research protections and ethical research support in the field of drug development, describes how clinical trials work, who participates in them, and why.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. McNair.

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7:00pm

Sun January 12, 2014
Health

Go nuts the next time you snack

Credit Leah Landry / WRVO

Want to get your weight down and your health up? Maybe you've made a New Years resolution that says you're sticking to heart healthy foods and a guilt-free diet plan. Turns out the answer is nuts.

A recent study, in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that people who regularly eat nuts are 20 percent less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease or cancer. Registered dietitian Rachel Berman joined us to discuss the findings and to take a good look at the heart-healthy nut.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Rachel Berman.

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8:31am

Fri January 10, 2014
Health

How do clinical drug trials work?

Key Foster Flickr

Every drug in the pharmacy has to go through clinical trials before it is approved for use in the United States. But how do clinical trials work? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Lindsay McNair, a leading pharmaceutical physician and researcher about who participates in these trials and why.

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7:01pm

Sun January 5, 2014
Health

Take Care Year in Review

“Take Care” welcomes the new year by celebrating the one that just passed. We've condensed our shows from 2013 into a half hour of the best of "Take Care" -- vital advice from the leading experts on how to stay healthy and well in the new year and beyond. 

2013 marked the debut of “Take Care.” The show’s tagline, "a conversation on health and wellness," highlights the basic premise that underscores this show: What could we learn if we sat down with some of the world's top authorities in medicine, science and wellness and asked them for their most essential advice?

Out of the dozens of guests Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen spoke to in 2013, we selected nine experts whose practical advice for improving your health is relatively easy to incorporate. They explain why even the smallest investment in your health can have huge returns.

Click 'Read More' to hear "Take Care Year in Review"

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9:46am

Fri January 3, 2014
Health

How to 'Take Care' in 2014

Many people make resolutions to be healthier this time of year -- whether that involves nutrition, exercise, or stress reduction. WRVO's weekly health show "Take Care" offers some suggestions if you're still trying to decide how to improve your wellness. Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen take a look back at the advice some of the experts they interviewed offered listeners in 2013.

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4:03pm

Mon December 30, 2013
Health

New medical society president says physicians need more say in health care system

Dr. David Halleran is the new president of the Onondaga County Medical Society
Courtesy Onodaga County Medical Society

Health care, and particularly the world of physicians, is changing. The new president of the Onondaga County Medical Society says it’s a result of a business model that ends up limiting how doctors do their jobs.

Dr. David Halleran says over the past couple of decades, the business model of medicine has focused on profits and efficiency. And he believes that has created a more disparate medical community.

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9:07am

Mon December 30, 2013
Health

New prostate cancer diagnostic tool comes to region

Gennady Bratslavasky, head of the urology department at Upstate Medical University shows an ultrasound
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Upstate Medical University has a new tool that can help diagnose one of the most common cancers that strikes men. The hospital is one of the first in the nation to purchase a technology that gives doctors a more targeted approach in finding prostate cancer.

Jeff Barkley, a firefighter from Phoenix, had close family members die from prostate cancer. But even as his PSA level rose over the last several years -- that’s the blood test that is an indicator of prostate cancer -- five biopsies came back negative.

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7:28am

Mon December 23, 2013
Health

Affordable Care Act sign up deadline is today

Navigators have been educating people about what health care coverage plans are available through the New York State of Health. (File photo)
Ellen Abbott WRVO

Today is the deadline for individuals to sign up for health care coverage through the Affordable Care Act in order to get coverage by Jan. 1. So far, New York state’s experience with this groundbreaking change in the way Americans get health care coverage has been generally positive.

Todd Muscatello is a Vice President for Sales at Blue Cross Blue Shield in Syracuse. As someone who deals in the vagaries of health insurance every day, he says he's glad he lives in New York state.  

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