Health

5:39am

Fri November 22, 2013
Health

Overcoming fear important factor in controlling social anxiety

Millions of Americans suffer from social anxiety disorder, an extreme fear of being judged by others in social situations. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with doctor Robin Zasio, a nationally known clinical psychologist and author about what social anxiety disorder is and how to treat it.

Lorraine Rapp: would you explain the difference between just being shy and actual social anxiety?

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8:25am

Thu November 21, 2013
Health

Should we buy and sell organs?

Some rights reserved by Refracted Moments

It’s illegal to buy and sell organs in the United States, but a new study suggests paying people to donate kidneys could address the chronic shortage of available organs and be more cost effective than the current system.

The idea immediately raises the question; is there a way to buy and sell organs ethically?

In upstate New York alone there are more than 1,300 patients on the waitlist for a donated kidney. Some have been on that list for more than four years.

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8:59am

Mon November 18, 2013
Health

Lack of lung cancer advocacy hinders research dollars, improvements

Aidan Jones Flickr

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, but chances are you might not know that. Lung cancer just doesn’t get some of the same attention as other types of cancer, and that ultimately leads to more deaths.

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7:01pm

Sun November 17, 2013
Health

With strokes, "time saved is brain saved"

gwire Flickr

While time is often a major factor in determining how much damage a medical ailment can cause, it is especially true with strokes. Under the right conditions, the reversibility of stroke symptoms can decrease by the minute. But why is the saying “time saved is brain saved” so important when it comes to strokes?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Larry Goldstein, discusses how to recognize a stroke, and why time is of the essence when it comes to treating them. Dr. Goldstein is a professor of neurology at Duke University and director of the Duke Comprehensive Stroke Center in North Carolina.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldstein.

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7:00pm

Sun November 17, 2013
Health

Why so SAD?

Marcel Flickr

Winter in central and northern New York isn’t always as picturesque as some may wish it to be. Daylight is usually gone before the work day is over, flurries have the potential to make any drive difficult, and gray skies often seem like they’re never going away. It’s normal to feel off when the days get shorter, but what happens when these feelings manifest into something much more serious on a yearly basis?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Rohan discusses the causes and treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Rohan is an expert in SAD and acting director of clinical training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Vermont.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rohan.

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6:09am

Fri November 15, 2013
Health

Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke

Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.

Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?

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7:04am

Wed November 13, 2013
Health

Medicare open enrollment deadline approaches

There’s less than a month until the Dec. 7 deadline, when Medicare’s open enrollment period ends.

Blaine Longnecker, a sales consultant out of Syracuse’s Excellus Blue Cross Blue Shield office, said seniors eligible for the federal health insurance program who are looking to change their plan shouldn't bide their time.

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7:01pm

Sun November 10, 2013
Health

Much is still unknown about Parkinson's disease

Circuits of the basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease. Picture shows 2 coronal slices have been superimposed to include the involved basal ganglia.
Credit Mikael Häggström

While Michael J. Fox may best be known for his acting, many know him as one of the leading figures in taking away the stigma against Parkinson’s disease. Fox, along with former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, boxer Muhammad Ali and singer Linda Ronstadt have all been open and frank about their diagnosis of the disease. But as more and more of the public are aware of the disease though, there is still much that is unknown about Parkinson’s disease.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelvin Chou discusses the uncertainties involved with Parkinson’s disease, as well as cutting edge ways to treat it. Dr. Chou is associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the University of Michigan Medical School, and is one of the country’s leading authorities on Parkinson’s disease. He has recently published a book for patients and families called Deep Brain Stimulation: A New Life for People with Parkinson’s, Dystonia and Essential Tremor.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Chou.

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7:00pm

Sun November 10, 2013
Health

What should men do when they have 'Low T?'

Credit DEA.gov

You’ve seen the advertisements. A middle-aged man appears to be depressed and withdrawn from his family, and his interest in sexual activity is at an all-time low. What’s wrong with him? He’s been suffering from low testosterone levels, and all of his problems can be solved with a simple supplement. The frequency of ads for testosterone supplements have increased recently, and with it, questions about how legitimate testosterone replacement therapy is.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Martin Miner discusses the facts and myths of the condition known as “low T,” or reduced levels of testosterone in men. Dr. Miner is the co-director of the Men’s Health Center and chief of Family Practice and Community Medicine at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. He’s also clinical associate professor of family medicine and urology at Brown University Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Miner.

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7:50am

Fri November 8, 2013
Health

Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment

A PET scan may be used to help diagnose Parkinson's disease.
Liz West Flickr

Parkinson's disease used to be something people didn't like to talk about. But celebrities like Michael J. Fox and Linda Ronstadt, who have been open about having the degenerative nervous disorder, have taken away some of the stigma. There is still much about Parkinson's that even the experts don't understand. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr.

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8:09am

Thu November 7, 2013
Health

Health navigators say Affordable Care Act sign-ups have been successful

There may be problems in other states for people signing up for health care under the Affordable Care Act, but things are moving smoothly in New York state, according to one organization in the midst of it. ACR Health in Syracuse says it has nothing but success stories.

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7:01pm

Sun November 3, 2013
Health

Hepatitis C -- the "silent epidemic"

Hepatitis virions.
Microbe World Flickr

The “baby boomer” generation – Americans born between 1945 and 1965, has had a big impact on American society and culture. Now a disease is having a big effect on them. Baby boomers are five times more likely to have contracted Hepatitis C than the rest of the population. With symptoms that may not appear for decades, most may not even know they have Hepatitis C until it is too late.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Bryce D. Smith explains why all baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C. Dr. Smith is a lead health scientist in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, and is the primary author of recent Hepatitis C testing recommendations that are aimed at members of the baby boomer generation.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Smith.

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7:00pm

Sun November 3, 2013
Health

How to de-stress and improve your health

bottled_void Flickr

Stress is a part of everyday life, and for some people, the workplace can be a significant cause. Sometimes, when work isn’t left at work, stress from the job can bleed into your personal life and severely affect your physical health. But, dealing with work stress can be easier than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Jane Pernotto Ehrman discusses causes of stress in the workplace and ways to deal with it. Ehrman is the lead behavioral specialist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine, in the Wellness Institute, where she develops and implements the behavioral and stress management sections of lifestyle wellness programs.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Jane Pernotto Ehrman.

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8:58am

Fri November 1, 2013
Health

NY says its health exchange unaffected by federal problems so far

Amid ongoing problems with the federal health insurance exchange website, New York is one of a handful of states where residents can successfully enroll through the state's health insurance marketplace, according to state officials.

Elisabeth Benjamin, a New York state health navigator, said the site did have some glitches in the first two weeks, but said now she is thrilled with the exchange's success so far.  

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5:41am

Fri November 1, 2013
Health

Why baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C

Health providers in New York state are now required to offer a Hepatitis C test to all baby boomers. That's because about three-quarters of people who have the virus don't know they have it -- and most are in the baby boomer generation. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care” recently spoke with Dr. Bryce Smith of the Centers for Disease Control about this silent epidemic.

Lorraine Rapp: So I know there are different forms of the virus Hepatitis. This is Hepatitis C —what exactly is it and why is it so dangerous?

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7:01pm

Sun October 27, 2013
Health

More salt, more problems, says expert

Judy van der Velden Flickr

If your mouth begins to water when you think about pretzels, peanuts and French fries, then you probably like salty foods. If this is true, then you are one of the many who love salt. But while some people understand that too much salt intake isn’t healthy, most don’t realize that cutting back on salt means more than just avoiding the salt shaker during meal time.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Norman Kaplan discusses salt’s effect on the body, and why people should be much more aware of how much salt they are actually taking in. Dr. Kaplan is a professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where he’s been on the faculty for over four decades. His book, Kaplan’s Clinical Hypertension, is currently in its 10th edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kaplan.

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7:00pm

Sun October 27, 2013
Health

Angina, Bob Dole, and NASCAR: How Viagra solidified its role in American society

Felix E. Guerrero Flickr

1998 brought about many things: the invention of Google, the Monica Lewinsky scandal, the Winter Olympic Games in Japan and the film Armageddon. While these events took the world by storm, one little blue pill also made its way on to the scene, and has changed how Americans view sex in the 15 years since.

This week on Take Care, sociologist Meika Loe discusses the history and the effects of the drug Viagra. Loe is an associate professor of sociology and women’s studies at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y., and the author of the book The Rise of Viagra: How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Meika Loe.

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7:59am

Fri October 25, 2013
Health

Cutting back on sodium means more than just putting down the salt shaker

pboyd04 Flickr

Many health professionals recommend eating less salt. But why is too much salt bad for your health? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Norman Kaplan of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, whose textbook on high blood pressure, "Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension," is in its 10th edition.

Lorraine Rapp: So when it enters our system, what actually takes place in the body that causes it to have harmful effects on our blood pressure?

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7:51am

Fri October 25, 2013
Health

Start of flu season best time to get vaccinated

Credit USACE Europe District / via Flickr

Onondaga County Health Commissioner Dr. Cynthia Morrow said there are signs that the flu season is upon us. Morrow said there is one laboratory confirmed case of the flu in Onondaga County, and she's hearing reports from doctors offices about unconfirmed cases.  

Morrow said it's a good time for central New Yorkers to get their flu vaccine. She also said this year's vaccine may offer more protection than those in the past, which targeted three flu strains.

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8:04am

Tue October 22, 2013
Health

Schumer urges DEA to ease drug take-back restrictions

Sen. Charles Schumer is urging the DEA to loosen restrictions for drug take back programs. He is also asking the agency to allow funding for a drug buy back program.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is firing another salvo in the war against prescription drug abuse. He's proposing that the Drug Enforcement Administration ease restrictions that make it harder for pharmacies to let people bring in controlled substances for disposal.

It's a problem that's getting worse in upstate New York, according to Michelle Caliva, director of the Upstate Poison Control Center. She's looked at the number of calls involving abuse of prescription pain killers over the last decade.

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10:10am

Mon October 21, 2013
Health

Fear is in the mind of the beholder

charamelody Flickr

You’re watching a scary movie. As the suspense begins building, you notice that your heart rate increases, your pupils dilate, and you that you are beginning to sweat. Is it hot in the room? No, that’s not what’s causing it. What you’re experiencing is good ol’ fashioned fear.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Liz Phelps discusses two kinds of fear: real and fake. Dr. Phelps is the director of the Phelps Lab at NYU and a professor in psychology. Her research focuses on how human learning and memory are changed by emotion, and what neural systems mediate the interactions between the three.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Phelps.

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7:04am

Mon October 21, 2013
Health

Medical Device Tax must go, say medical tech companies

Some rights reserved by 401(K) 2013 Flickr

One of the key points of contention in the Affordable Care Act is the medical devices tax. Republicans want the 2.3 percent tax designed to help fund health care reform removed.

The medical device industry has also lobbied extensively to have the tax repealed, claiming it will stifle innovation and result in job losses.

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7:00pm

Sun October 20, 2013
Health

Sugar and cavities: The "tooth" behind what causes decay

dreyboblue Flickr

Halloween wouldn’t be the same without horror films, costumes, and of course, candy. The more candy, the more successful the trick-or-treating. But when children start sorting through their sugary treasures, it may not be a bad idea to have a toothbrush on standby to help combat the real horror of Halloween — cavities.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Thomas Salinas talks about why sugar, something most people -- particularly kids -- love, can cause cavities and dental decay. Dr. Salinas is a professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic, a world renown medical practice and research group in Rochester, Minnesota.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Salinas.

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6:26am

Fri October 18, 2013
Health

Why exactly is sugar bad for your teeth?

Steven Guzzardi Flickr

October 31 is right around the corner, and with Halloween comes candy. We've all been told, with too much candy comes cavities. But why does sugar cause tooth decay? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Thomas Salinas, professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic about how cavities occur and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about sugar that causes cavities?

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7:20am

Thu October 17, 2013
Health

Children's Clinic, WIC funded for at least six months

The WIC program serves about 10,000 people from Watertown to Malone.
Joanna Richards/WRVO

Last week was a rough one for the North Country Children's Clinic in Watertown. As the non-profit confronted mounting financial problems, it announced that it had to close. Then, on Thursday, local lawmakers jumped in to keep the center open for at least another month. Now, the clinic says it has secured funding for another six months.

When the North Country Children’s Clinic announced its closure last week, it was really bracing for the worst.

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7:01pm

Sun October 13, 2013
Health

How to get the most out of the modern day ER

Mark Coggins Flickr

When people hear “emergency room,” thoughts of high stress medical situations that could play out on televised shows such as ER often come to mind. While this is fitting to a certain extent, more and more people are finding themselves at the ER to deal with situations that used to be dealt with in the doctor’s office. This is because the ER has changed dramatically in more ways than one.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Leana Wen discusses how the modern ER works and how to prepare for a visit to it. Dr. Wen is an attending emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, and the author of When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Wen.

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7:00pm

Sun October 13, 2013
Health

You can't go wrong with fall veggies

Leah Landry WRVO

What do you think of when you hear the words "fall foods?" For children, “fall foods” may mean candy corn and Halloween treats, while others may think vegetables -- things like squash, cabbage and beets. These fall under the category of autumnal vegetables, and can provide many healthy benefits to consumers of them.

This week on Take Care, nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about what makes fall vegetables good for you. Rogus is a registered dietitian in central New York who's been a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for over 25 years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

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6:59pm

Sun October 13, 2013
Health

Decluttering your home can also mean decluttering your mind

spykster Flickr

It comes in many different forms and can show up in many different places — on top of something, under something, around something, inside of something. Clutter can essentially happen just about anywhere. While this description may sound a bit scary, one psychologist insists it’s not as scary as many people may think.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio discusses how to manage clutter. Zasio is clinical psychologist who specializes in anxiety disorders. She has appeared on the A&E reality television show Hoarders, and is the author of The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Zasio.

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7:59am

Fri October 11, 2013
Health

Do you know when to visit the emergency room?

File Photo
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The emergency room has become an integral part of the American medical system. But how do you know when you should go to the E.R.? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen about what you should know before you have to visit an emergency room.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you give us a quick overview of how emergency rooms have changed over the years—how it might affect us as patients?

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12:05am

Fri October 11, 2013
Health

UPDATE: North Country Children's Clinic gets last-minute rescue

The North Country Children's Clinic has had a tumultuous week. It announced on Tuesday that it would cease operations Friday, but a last-minute deal with Samaritan Medical Center and the state Department of Health will keep it open for at least the next month.
Credit FDRHPO

A last-minute deal was struck Thursday to rescue a long-standing health care safety net for needy north country children. The North Country Children's Clinic in Watertown announced Tuesday that it would close suddenly, at the end of the week, because of dire financial problems. Now, the clinic has gotten at least another month of life.

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