Health

5:34am

Fri September 6, 2013
Health

Celiac disease -- more than gluten intolerance

Gluten intolerance has recently become a popular nutritional catch phrase. But behind the hype of the many gluten-free products currently on the market is an actual disorder called celiac disease. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Daniel Leffler, who is the director of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston about how the disease is diagnosed and treated.

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4:09pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Health

Digital tools helping to keep off the "Freshman 15"

Jeremy Wilburn Creative Commons License

It used to be the "Freshman 5." Now it’s the "Freshman 15." But students who started college this fall now have new digital tools available to help them stay healthy.

On-demand digital health information being provided by colleges seems to be helping control those extra pounds undergraduates can put on.

Dietician Colleen Dour evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based wellness program in a study for Syracuse University. The program focuses on wellness and body image, rather than dieting.

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5:59am

Tue September 3, 2013
Health

Mobile app could track foodborne illness with a single tweet

Shawn Campbell/flickr

Upstate researchers have found a way predict the likelihood of getting sick after visiting a particular restaurant. The system is called Nemesis and monitors tweets made by restaurant patrons on the popular social media website, Twitter. It then detects likely cases of foodborne illness in close to real-time.

Many people tweet on devices that are GPS enabled, and Nemesis uses this to figure out which restaurant they ate at. It continues to track their tweets for 72 hours after a restaurant visit, to detect whether or not they’ve become ill.

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8:34am

Sun September 1, 2013
Health

How should you make the medicine go down?

e-MagineArt.com Flickr

Capsules, chewable tablets, gel tabs -- Over-the-counter medications now come in so many different formulations, it's difficult to figure out what to take. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen....hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Spoke to Dr. Lindsay McNair, a pharmaceutical physician and professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, about how to best take your medicine.

Lorraine Rapp: There are so many forms that these over the counter medications come in. What was behind their development?

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7:01pm

Sun August 25, 2013
Health

The I-STOP law: an assemblyman's push to solve a big problem

VCU Libraries Flickr

Prescription drugs can be helpful to those that need them. But for others they can be dangerous or even deadly. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to New York State Assemblyman Michael Cusick, the lead sponsor behind a piece of legislation called I-STOP, or Internet System for Tracking Over Prescribing, which is intended to serve as a national model to end prescription painkiller abuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Assemblyman Cusick.

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7:00pm

Sun August 25, 2013
Health

The I-STOP law: a doctor worries for his patients

Credit Shawn Honnick / Flickr

The new I-STOP law passed by the New York State Legislature is aimed at reducing the amount of overdoses on prescription painkillers; although some groups worry it might do more harm than good. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Joseph Navone, president of the Upstate New York Society of Medical Oncology and Hematology, a group that specializes in pain and pain relief for patients.

Click 'Read More' to hear out interview with Dr. Joseph Navone.

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7:01pm

Sun August 18, 2013
Health

Measure, manage & motivate: how fitness trackers can help

bfishadow/flickr

Do you ever wonder how many steps you’ve taken in a day or how many calories you’ve burned off on the treadmill? Do you wish you could have someone make sure you get out of bed and to the gym?  This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Jennifer Jolly, an Emmy-winning consumer technology journalist and host of USA Today’s “TechNow,” about the newest trend in working out – fitness trackers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Jennifer Jolly.

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7:00pm

Sun August 18, 2013
Health

How anticipation and reward make the brain love music

MatthiasRhomberg/Flickr

It’s hard to make it through the day without listening to music whether it is on the radio, a computer or a portable mp3 player. But why do we get so happy listening to our favorite song, singing in the shower or even learning to play a musical instrument? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Robert Zatorre, a professor of neuroscience at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University, on why music makes our brains sing.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robert Zatorre.

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5:34am

Fri August 16, 2013
Health

Why 'music makes our brain sing'

For many people, music evokes an emotional response of pleasure. Neurologist Dr. Robert Zatorre, of McGill University in Montreal, has studied why our favorite songs cause those feelings. He recently wrote about his findings in a New York Times article "Why Music Makes our Brain Sing." And, as Dr. Zatorre told Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," the answer lies in the way the brain processes anticipation and reward.

Lorraine Rapp:  What has your research revealed as to why music affects us the way it does?

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6:47am

Tue August 13, 2013
Health

West Nile Encephalitis confirmed in horse in Oneida County

A yearling horse in the town of Vernon has tested positive for West Nile Encephalitis, despite the fact the county has not yet discovered the virus in any mosquito pools during its summer monitoring.

The horse eventually became paralyzed in its hind legs, but was treated by veterinarians and has shown improvement. Ken Fanelli, a spokesman with the Oneida County Health Department, says it can be difficult to keep horses from contracting West Nile Virus.

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5:16am

Mon August 12, 2013
Health

Upstate hospitals get mixed reviews in 2013 report card

Crouse Hospital in Syracuse received poor marks for six cases of leaving an object in a patient during surgery.
der_krampus via Flickr

Four hospitals in upstate New York have been given poor grades and put on a "watch list" by a private health care watchdog group.

The Niagara Health Quality Coalition has been ranking New York state’s best and worst hospitals for a decade, and the latest report card released on Sunday shows a mixed bag in upstate New York.

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7:01pm

Sun August 11, 2013
Health

The 'big mistake' of painkillers

Peacock Parables Flickr

They’re supposed to kill pain, but they could be hurting patients more than helping them. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Barry Meier, a New York Times reporter and the author of A World of Hurt: Fixing Pain Medicine’s Biggest Mistake, about painkillers in the medical field.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barry Meier.

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7:00pm

Sun August 11, 2013
Health

Hearing loss: likely, but not inevitable

Eknath Gomphotherium Flickr

As we get older, we can lose our hair, our eyesight, but the affect aging has on our hearing can be less apparent. And how can we stop hearing loss? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Joseph Pellegrino, assistant professor and director of audiology at the Gebbie Hearing Clinic at Syracuse University, about age-related hearing disorders.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Pellegrino.

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5:34am

Fri August 9, 2013
Health

Hearing loss: why it happens and how to cope with it

Gradual hearing loss is one of those conditions a lot of us will face as we get older, but it may be hard to realize it’s happening. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with Joseph Pellegrino, director of audiology at the Gebbie Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic at Syracuse University, about how hearing loss happens and some new technologies that help people cope with hearing loss.

Lorraine Rapp: Is hearing loss inevitable as we age and what happens physically to cause it?

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7:41am

Thu August 8, 2013
Health

Ontario County nursing home sale approved

Some rights reserved by thinkpanama

Ontario County is moving forward with the privatization of its nursing home. The board of supervisors voted last week to accept a $2 million bid for the Hopewell facility, but concerns remain about the level of care a private owner would provide.

The sale makes Ontario the latest in a string of counties in upstate New York looking to privatization as a solution to the rising costs of operating a nursing home.

Steuben, Chautauqua, and Onondaga Counties are among many considering or finalizing the sale of county facilities to private operators.

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7:01pm

Sun August 4, 2013
Health

Why scientists say you may want to pour yourself another cup

Michael Simmons Flickr

Some of us can’t get going in the morning without a cup of coffee, but could it actually be good for us? Today on “Take Care,” we talk to New York Times “Well” blogger and health journalist Gretchen Reynolds about the benefits, and drawbacks of a cup of Joe. Reynolds wrote about recent scientific studies on coffee and caffeine in the June 9, 2013 edition of the New York Times Magazine.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Gretchen Reynolds.

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7:00pm

Sun August 4, 2013
Health

Conscious eldering - growing old with purpose

WouterWalmink

As Americans are living longer and longer, the question arises – how do you want to live your life in your senior years? This week on “Take Care,” we interview Ron Pevny, a counselor, psychotherapist, and the founder of the Center for Conscious Eldering in Durango, Colorado.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Ron Pevny.

Today, many people may find themselves with two or three decades of life to live after retirement. But how do you make those years “golden,” and not a period of decline? Pevny says the answer lies in “conscious eldering.”

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5:34am

Fri August 2, 2013
Health

Will a cup a day keep the doctor away?

Doug88888 Flickr

If you can't get through your morning without a couple cups of coffee, there's good news. Recent health studies show that coffee may be good for your brain and may help prevent certain diseases. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with health journalist Gretchen Reynolds about what researchers are learning about the health benefits of coffee.

Lorraine Rapp: Tell us about some of the recent studies linking coffee consumption with the reduction in developing some certain diseases.

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8:57am

Wed July 31, 2013
Health

Three upstate NY regions have low Medicare costs

Parts of upstate New York are spending less on Medicare than other regions of the U.S., according to a recent report by the Institute of Medicine.

The study analyzed health care spending, utilization and quality in more than 300 cities nationwide. Three upstate New York cities ranked among the lowest 20 spenders. Syracuse ranked 19th, while Buffalo ranked fourth. Rochester was found to have the lowest Medicare spending in the country. Its costs per beneficiary was $174 a month lower than the study's median.

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7:01pm

Sun July 28, 2013
Health

Osteoarthritis affects millions, but who's most at risk?

MyArthritis Flickr

It may be common to have pain and stiffness in your joints -- especially as you age-- but what’s the difference between routine pain and a serious disease? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Robert Shmerling about osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, which affects millions of people. Shmerling an associate professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School, senior medical editor at Harvard Health Publications and associate physician and clinical chief of rheumatology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Shmerling.

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7:00pm

Sun July 28, 2013
Health

Spice up your health

Clyde Robinson Flickr

Many of us try to stay healthy by eating things like fresh fruits and steamed vegetables, but are there any health benefits from what you find in your spice rack? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Denise Foley, editor at large for Prevention magazine and author of five books, including the Women’s Encyclopedia of Health and Emotional Healing, about the health effects of spices.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Denise Foley.

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9:04am

Fri July 26, 2013
Health

Is osteoarthritis inevitable?

Osteoarthritis affects millions of people. This most common form of arthritis occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time. 

Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show, "Take Care," spoke to Dr. Robert Shmerling, a rheumatologist and Harvard professor, about whether everyone gets arthritis with age -- and what can be done about it.

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11:10am

Thu July 25, 2013
Health

Medical Disclaimer

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provider.

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7:01pm

Sun July 21, 2013
Health

The ABCDEs of melanoma

Leah Landry WRVO

Melanoma has been on the rise in recent years. Why is that and how can we protect ourselves? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about the most serious form of skin cancer.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

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7:00pm

Sun July 21, 2013
Health

Neuroscience shows the brain is "wired for story"

Henry Bloomfield Flickr

Summer is the perfect time to dive into a good story. But did you know that stories are vital to the way the human brain learns? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Lisa Cron, author of “Wired for Story: The Writer’s Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence,” about the science behind storytelling.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Lisa Cron.

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8:10am

Fri July 19, 2013
Health

Upstate health care centers funded to get uninsured into Affordable Care Act

Some rights reserved by 401 (K) 2013

As delays pile up in the implementation of components of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded $150 million to the nation’s health care centers as part of an outreach and enrollment program for patients with low incomes.

The grants will help centers provide advice regarding the introduction of the Affordable Care Act, and how it will affect people’s current health coverage as well as those who are currently uninsured.

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7:27am

Thu July 18, 2013
Health

Schumer pushing for SUNY health care work training program

Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., is pushing for SUNY's application to establish health care worker training programs at its community colleges.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Sen. Charles Schumer is trying to get the federal labor department to steer $23 million to New York's community colleges so they can set up a health care worker training program.

The State University of New York is applying for the grant. It's similar to one SUNY won last year for high-tech manufacturing.

Twenty-nine community college campuses are listed on the grant application, and would split the grant money. The schools would also partner with area hospitals.

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8:10am

Mon July 15, 2013
Health

Operation Medicine Spoon launches in Syracuse

Upstate Poison Center Communication Director Gail Banach shows the Operation Medicine Spoon handouts
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The Upstate New York Poison Center wants to make sure parents are giving their children the proper doses of medicine.

A recent study shows that 40 percent of parents are giving their child the wrong amount of medicine, something that can lead to a possible overdose. The reason? They are using a teaspoon out of the kitchen drawer as a measuring tool, instead of a calibrated medicine spoon, according to Upstate Poison Center Communication Director Gail Banach.

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7:01pm

Sun July 14, 2013
Health

The mouth-body connection: How oral health and overall health may be connected

J. Fraser Flickr

The mouth is the gateway to the rest of the body -- both anatomically, and as researchers are finding out, to the health and well-being of the body.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Thomas Salinas, a professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic, about how the health of our mouth, teeth and gums affects our entire body.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Thomas Salinas.

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7:00pm

Sun July 14, 2013
Health

Health hazards of water in public pools

ed37 Flickr

Public pools are a community hotspot during the summer to cool off, but could they be harmful to your health? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Michele Hlavsa, chief of the Centers for Disease Control's Healthy Swimming Program, on how to be cautious when using public pools this summer.

Click 'Read More' to hear out interview with Michele Hlavsa.

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