health

1:30pm

Fri December 27, 2013
Arts

One-woman show about young adults with cancer takes stage

Jesse Pardee, 22, will perform a play she wrote about living with cancer this weekend.
Tom Magnarelli WRVO

A new play in Syracuse deals with one young adult's experience living with cancer with the goal of raising money for charity and bringing awareness to young adults who have the disease.

Jesse Pardee, 22, received her first dose of chemotherapy five years ago on Christmas Eve after being diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma, a cancer of the pelvis.

"My family's memories are probably worse than mine of that first weekend because I was drugged up," she recalled. "It was all a blur for me."

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8:12am

Fri December 27, 2013
Environment

Chemical exposure at Goodyear’s Niagara Falls plant will impact workers for years to come

Former Goodyear workers Diane and Harry Weist at home in western New York
Tom Dooley/WXXI

“You know the guys used to joke to me, they’d be like, man Goodyear’s been good to you Harry. They gave you a wife, because that’s where I met Diane, you have a father-in-law that you worked for, and the other thing you got at Goodyear was bladder cancer so you know, you got everything."

We’re well into the holiday season, when I sit down with Harry and Diane Weist in their renovated farmhouse in western New York. Our conversation’s interrupted a few times by their little chihuahua, who likes to get in on the act.

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7:57am

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Human-on-a-chip

Researchers at the ECBC look at results from human-on-a-chip testing.
ECBC

In a handful of labs around the U.S., researchers are creating human tissue from stem cells and manipulating them to replicate the functions of human organs, all on platforms about the size of a thumb drive. This research platform is known as a "human-on-a-chip," and it has the potential to change the nature of medical treatment.

Dr. Harry Salem has been involved in his fair share of exciting scientific breakthroughs, including the creation of the breathalyzer, the infant incubator, and Nyquil.

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7:46am

Fri December 6, 2013
Health

How much sleep is enough?

Tony Alter Flickr

Getting a good night's sleep is easier for some people than others. But research has shown it's essential for everyone. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Orfeu Buxton, a neuroscientist and sleep researcher from Harvard, about the health issues a lack of sleep can cause.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you tell us what role does sleep play in our overall health?

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7:54am

Thu November 28, 2013
Health

Shadow of U.S. polio epidemic likely to be seen for years to come

Richard Daggett in an iron lung at age 13.
Richard Daggett

A recent outbreak of polio in Syria has raised concerns over global effort to eradicate the disease. Although polio hasn’t been seen in the United States for years, the effects of the virus are beginning to reappear in the health care system through a condition known as Post-Polio Syndrome.

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7:01pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Don't be afraid, social anxiety is beatable

Cavale Doom Flickr

We're at that time of year when holiday parties and social activities crowd our social calendar. You may dread the office party and worry about what to wear, but that's a common anxiety many of us face.  But according to the National Institutes of Health, millions of Americans suffer from something much worse -- extreme fear of being scrutinized and judged by others. When the fear is so debilitating it disrupts daily life, it’s social anxiety disorder, a chronic mental health condition also known as social phobia.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, discusses social anxiety and how to overcome the disorder. Zasio is a nationally-known clinical psychologist who specializes in this field. She's familiar to many from her appearances on the A&E television series “Hoarders.” Zasio is also the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

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5:39am

Fri November 22, 2013
Health

Overcoming fear important factor in controlling social anxiety

Millions of Americans suffer from social anxiety disorder, an extreme fear of being judged by others in social situations. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with doctor Robin Zasio, a nationally known clinical psychologist and author about what social anxiety disorder is and how to treat it.

Lorraine Rapp: would you explain the difference between just being shy and actual social anxiety?

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8:25am

Thu November 21, 2013
Health

Should we buy and sell organs?

Some rights reserved by Refracted Moments

It’s illegal to buy and sell organs in the United States, but a new study suggests paying people to donate kidneys could address the chronic shortage of available organs and be more cost effective than the current system.

The idea immediately raises the question; is there a way to buy and sell organs ethically?

In upstate New York alone there are more than 1,300 patients on the waitlist for a donated kidney. Some have been on that list for more than four years.

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6:09am

Fri November 15, 2013
Health

Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke

Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.

Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?

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8:15am

Tue November 5, 2013
Environment

Proposed policy may allow fracking wastewater to be moved on waterways

Bosc d'Anjou Flickr

The U.S. Coast Guard has released a proposed policy that would allow fracking wastewater to be transported on waterways around the country. The public has 30 days to weigh in on the issue, and one New York state group is strongly opposed to the plan.

Fracking wastewater contains a mix of chemicals as well as some radioactive materials, and currently isn’t approved for transport on the nation’s rivers and lakes.

Kate Hudson from Riverkeeper, a New York state clean water advocate group, says even though the policy is in its early stages, it raises some serious concerns.

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7:51am

Fri October 25, 2013
Health

Start of flu season best time to get vaccinated

Credit USACE Europe District / via Flickr

Onondaga County Health Commissioner Dr. Cynthia Morrow said there are signs that the flu season is upon us. Morrow said there is one laboratory confirmed case of the flu in Onondaga County, and she's hearing reports from doctors offices about unconfirmed cases.  

Morrow said it's a good time for central New Yorkers to get their flu vaccine. She also said this year's vaccine may offer more protection than those in the past, which targeted three flu strains.

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8:57pm

Wed October 23, 2013
Environment

Public helps shape state study on health patterns near Air Brake site

Current and former residents of Watertown's north side neighborhood, near the New York Air Brake plant, listen to a presentation about a health study the state Health Department will carry out.
Justin Sorenson, Watertown Daily Times

Earlier this week, a researcher from the state Health Department met with Watertown residents from the neighborhood near the New York Air Brake plant. The Health Department has agreed to study the area’s disease patterns because residents suspect that pollution from the plant has made people sick.

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7:19pm

Wed October 23, 2013
Regional Coverage

Head of Children's Clinic resigns in wake of financial upheaval

Dan Wasneechak has had a bumpy ride in the two months he's headed up the North Country Children's Clinic in Waterown. After announcing its temporary closure, then working on a deal to keep it open for now, Wasneechak will resign on Friday.
Joanna Richards

The head of the North Country Children's Clinic in Watertown says he'll resign after Friday. A spokeswoman for Samaritan Medical Center, which is temporarily operating the clinic, said Dan Wasneechak  submitted his resignation yesterday. She said he gave no reason for his decision.

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6:26am

Fri October 18, 2013
Health

Why exactly is sugar bad for your teeth?

Steven Guzzardi Flickr

October 31 is right around the corner, and with Halloween comes candy. We've all been told, with too much candy comes cavities. But why does sugar cause tooth decay? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Thomas Salinas, professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic about how cavities occur and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about sugar that causes cavities?

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6:01am

Wed October 16, 2013
Regional Coverage

New food co-op in Syracuse brings healthy options to southside neighborhood

The interior of the Eat to Live Food Co-op.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

A new food co-op on Syracuse's southside has opened its doors. Neighbors are welcoming the new Eat to Live Food Cooperative on South Salina Street, an area that doesn't have many options when it comes to buying healthy food.  

Joseph Bryant, president of the Southside Community Coalition said the co-op ultimately eliminates a food desert.

"Fifty-two percent of the people in this census tract use public transportation or walk. So not having the ability to drive to a grocery store is one thing, so now we can provide midday shopping trips in the neighborhood," Bryant said.

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5:05pm

Tue October 15, 2013
Regional Coverage

Lawsuit against Watertown industrial polluter gaining momentum

The New York Air Brake industrial site in Watertown is the subject of an impending class-action lawsuit by current and former neighborhood residents who say past chemical dumping caused illnesses and birth defects.
Credit Joanna Richards

Current and former residents of Watertown's north side neighborhood have been building a public case against the company New York Air Brake, over former chemical dumping they say has made them sick. The law firm of famous environmental attorney Erin Brockovich has taken interest in the case. Now, a lawsuit is shaping up, and the state Department of Health is planning its own investigation.

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7:59am

Fri October 11, 2013
Health

Do you know when to visit the emergency room?

File Photo
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The emergency room has become an integral part of the American medical system. But how do you know when you should go to the E.R.? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen about what you should know before you have to visit an emergency room.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you give us a quick overview of how emergency rooms have changed over the years—how it might affect us as patients?

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6:45am

Fri October 11, 2013
Fracking

Cuomo says no "do-over" needed on fracking health review

File photo
Zack Seward WXXI

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the state’s health study of hydrofracking doesn’t need a “do-over” as a member of his administration’s review panel charged Wednesday.

Cuomo appeared unfamiliar with Binghamton Assemblywoman Donna Lupardo’s call for a new health review when asked about it in Utica on Thursday.

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7:52am

Wed October 9, 2013
Health

Researcher looks for Alzheimer's diagnosis in speech patterns

Researchers hope recording voices of Alzheimer's patients will help lead to earlier detection of the disease.
License Attribution Some rights reserved by roland / Creative Commons License

A Binghamton researcher is launching a study that he hopes will help with early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. David Shaffer is looking for Alzheimer’s patients so he can record their voices. Shaffer believes if he can get enough samples and enough funding, he could pinpoint how a deteriorating brain reveals itself in speech patterns, because so much of the brain is involved in speaking.

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1:55am

Wed October 9, 2013
Regional Coverage

Children's Clinic closes temporarily under financial hardship

Dan Wasneechak didn't know how bleak the North Country Children's Clinic's finances were when he was hired as its chief in August. On Tuesday, he announced the clinic would temporarily close to try to resolve its fiscal issues.
Credit Joanna Richards

When Dan Wasneechak took the helm of the North Country Children's Clinic in August, he had no idea that less than two months into his tenure, he'd be announcing its temporary closure. But he did that yesterday afternoon, after a frantic week of trying to sort out the clinic's finances to keep it running.

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2:34am

Tue October 8, 2013
Regional Coverage

Navigators, private brokers tackle new insurance exchange

Donna Hynes, an official New York state health insurance exchange "navigator," says many people are on her waiting list for appointments to get help shopping for plans.
Joanna Richards

Most people have heard of “navigators” for the new health insurance exchanges. They're the trained, impartial guides funded by the federal government to help people make more informed choices as they shop for policies. And then there are private insurance brokers...there's been less talk about it, but they, too, can help consumers sign up for plans.

On the exchanges' first days, both kinds of guides were busy on the front lines of this major policy shift.

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7:16am

Mon September 23, 2013
Health

Syracuse's Golisano Hospital using laser technology to treat brain tumors

Dr. Zulma Tovar-Spinoza with two-year-old Arianna Failla and her mother, Jennifer Failla.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Syracuse's Upstate Golisano Children's Hospital is the first in the nation using laser technology to treat a rare, genetic disease with a multi-staged approach. The new use of laser ablation technology has changed the lives of families with children suffering from tuberous sclerosis in central New York.

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6:46am

Fri September 13, 2013
Politics and Government

Environmentalists say decline in pollution enforcement can harm New Yorkers' health

An environmental group says budget cuts at the state’s environmental agency has meant up to 75 percent fewer inspections of polluters like power plants and hazardous waste sites.

David Gahl, with Environmental Advocates, says years of budget cuts at the state Department of Environmental Conservation, known as the DEC, has led to a one-third reduction of staff, and an even greater decrease in the number of inspections of potential polluters.

“DEC is looking less and finding less,” Gahl said.

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7:00pm

Sun September 8, 2013
Health

Does an apple a day really keep the doctor away?

Kevin Maloney

We’ve all been told that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. In the over 150 years that saying has been around, many have taken it as common health knowledge. But are apples really that good for you?

According to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician from central New York, the reason the saying has stood the test of time is because of the truth behind it. When asked what health benefits an apple can provide, Joan believes an easier question to answer would be, “What doesn’t an apple do for us?”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

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4:09pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Health

Digital tools helping to keep off the "Freshman 15"

Jeremy Wilburn Creative Commons License

It used to be the "Freshman 5." Now it’s the "Freshman 15." But students who started college this fall now have new digital tools available to help them stay healthy.

On-demand digital health information being provided by colleges seems to be helping control those extra pounds undergraduates can put on.

Dietician Colleen Dour evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based wellness program in a study for Syracuse University. The program focuses on wellness and body image, rather than dieting.

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5:59am

Tue September 3, 2013
Health

Mobile app could track foodborne illness with a single tweet

Shawn Campbell/flickr

Upstate researchers have found a way predict the likelihood of getting sick after visiting a particular restaurant. The system is called Nemesis and monitors tweets made by restaurant patrons on the popular social media website, Twitter. It then detects likely cases of foodborne illness in close to real-time.

Many people tweet on devices that are GPS enabled, and Nemesis uses this to figure out which restaurant they ate at. It continues to track their tweets for 72 hours after a restaurant visit, to detect whether or not they’ve become ill.

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11:10am

Thu July 25, 2013
Health

Medical Disclaimer

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provider.

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5:38am

Fri July 19, 2013
Science

How humans are "wired for story"

Humans are different from other mammals in many ways, but scientific evidence shows that one of the greatest distinctions is that the human brain is hard-wired to learn through storytelling. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," spoke to writer Lisa Cron who wrote a book on why people crave and need stories.

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8:10am

Mon July 15, 2013
Health

Operation Medicine Spoon launches in Syracuse

Upstate Poison Center Communication Director Gail Banach shows the Operation Medicine Spoon handouts
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The Upstate New York Poison Center wants to make sure parents are giving their children the proper doses of medicine.

A recent study shows that 40 percent of parents are giving their child the wrong amount of medicine, something that can lead to a possible overdose. The reason? They are using a teaspoon out of the kitchen drawer as a measuring tool, instead of a calibrated medicine spoon, according to Upstate Poison Center Communication Director Gail Banach.

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10:51pm

Sun June 16, 2013
Regional Coverage

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki celebrates milestones for Syracuse VA hospital

Secretary Shinseki helps hospital officials cut the ribbon symbolizing the grand opening of the new spinal cord wing of the Syracuse VA Medical Center.
Joanna Richards WRVO

Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki was in Syracuse last week, to mark the 60th anniversary of the city's VA Medical Center. He also helped to formally open a new Spinal Cord Injury and Disorder Center. 

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