heart disease

osseous / Flickr

The leading cause of death in the U.S. has seen an incredible drop in the last decade or so. That's because hospitals have made a series of small changes that have led to the survival of more heart attack victims. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with New York Times health and science reporter Gina Kolata about what she found were the reasons behind this change.

This week on HealthLink on Air: Dr. Scott Van Valkenburg discusses common foot problems -- plus, discussion on hot flashes and heart disease in women.

Also on the show, central New Yorkers have an opportunity to participate in a study designed to help find a vaccine for dengue fever, a mosquito-born disease that affects many parts of the developing world and parts of the United States.

This week: how to feed a picky eater and more

Feb 19, 2015

A parent's job is to put healthy foods on their children’s plates. After that "you need to back up and let the child choose what they are going to eat," according to Roseanne Jones.

Jones, a registered dietitian, says if a child doesn't want to eat something in particular, don't force it. This week, many more tips and advice for parents whose children are picky eaters.

Also on this week’s show: heart disease in women, and polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Mike Blyth / Flickr

In the early days of the AIDS epidemic, a positive diagnosis was virtually a death sentence.  Today, a person taking antiretroviral medications can live long term with the disease as a chronic infection. Now researchers are looking into why the aging population living with HIV/AIDS is at greater risk for heart disease and stroke.

Clinical researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center will use a $3.8 million grant to investigate why people treated with antiretrovirals for HIV have higher than average rates of heart disease and stroke.

Stress, anxiety and heart health

Jan 2, 2015
Nicolas Raymond / freestock.ca via Flickr

Can stress, anxiety and depression cause heart disease? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Peter Gianaros, a psychology professor at the University of Pittsburgh about his research into how the mind-body connection effects heart health.

Lorraine Rapp: What have you learned about how what we think and feel effect cardiovascular health?

Answer to preventing illness may be in Vitamin D

May 18, 2014
Shezamm

Vitamin D is the vitamin most often associated with sunshine, but could it also be used to prevent cancer and heart disease?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University and chief of preventative medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, discusses how clinical trials could prove that Vitamin D could help prevent diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and cancer.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joann Manson.

Angioplasty: How balloons can save your life

Apr 13, 2014
Denise Chan / flickr

If bent the right way, a balloon can be used to make an animal. If pumped with hot air, a balloon can be used to fly. Balloons have many different functions, mostly in the realm of fun. But, balloons have also been used to save lives through a procedure known as angioplasty.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Amar Krishnaswamy discusses angioplasties. Dr. Krishnaswamy is an interventional cardiologist in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Krishnaswamy.

Better technology may flatline stethoscope use

Apr 6, 2014
Michael / flickr

The stethoscope may be the most recognizable tool in healthcare. It’s used to listen to the internal sounds of the body, and can be found in almost every doctor’s office. But with the development of better technology, the stethoscope may soon become obsolete.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson discusses new stethoscope replacements. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

Cholesterol: The good, the bad, and the...wine?

Feb 16, 2014
wellcome images / flickr

Cholesterol. It’s something we need, but becomes a problem when there’s too much of it. It’s a buzzword often thrown around in advertisements for both food and medication, and something people watch out for in their diets. But what is cholesterol, and why can it be a problem?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson answers these questions and more. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

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Getting your flu shot this year may do more than just protect you from a runny nose and sore throat. A study published earlier this year in the Journal for the American Medical Association suggests that flu vaccinations may reduce the risk of heart disease.

Dr. Charlie Lowenstein is the chief of cardiology at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) in western New York. He says no one really knows why the flu can be bad for your heart, but there are some strong theories suggesting it can be.

More and more doctors are recommending their patients take a daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes. And recently, new studies have suggested aspirin might help with cancer prevention, as well. But why does aspirin help? And who really should be taking it? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," spoke with the physician who first demonstrated the life-saving properties of aspirin, Dr. Charles Hennekens.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Time is critical when it comes to treating a suspected heart attack. That's why local EMTs and emergency room doctors are happy about new cardiac technology getting into more ambulances.