helmets

Naloxone, a medication that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, can be purchased over the counter from pharmacies in New York and several other states, says Willie Eggleston, a clinical toxicologist and doctor of pharmacy from the Upstate New York Poison Center.

He explains how to administer naloxone, which is sold under the brand name Narcan, and how the medication works. He also tells about the Good Samaritan Law designed to protect people who are trying to help.

Rubbertoe (Robert Batina) / Flickr

Most contact sports today require players to wear a helmet. Cyclists and skiers wear them to protect from serious injury if they fall. While helmet technology has come a long way, there is still a push to make sure that they are providing as much protection as possible.

Dr. Stefan Duma is a professor of engineering and the founding director of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest Center for Injury Biomechanics. Duma joins us to discuss his research and the STAR safety rating system given to hockey and football helmets.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Anyone who has played a contact sport, like football or hockey, has had to wear a helmet. The same is true for other sports, like cycling and skiing. Helmets reduce the risk of severe head trauma if an injury does occur. Helmets worn by football players in the 1920s were made of leather and provided little protection. Today, helmets have several layers of padding, surrounded by a plastic or polycarbonate shell. 

Trysil / Flickr

The time to pull out the winter sporting gear has come, but with it comes the possibility of injury

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Navan Duggal discusses the strain winter sports can have on the body and what you can do to decrease the risk of injury. Duggal was chief of the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is currently in private practice at Syracuse Orthopedic Surgeons.

An upstate company has developed a system for motorcycle helmets that could have applications for both defensive driving and sports. A system of sensors alerts riders when the helmet has damage that might not be visible, but could compromise safety.