Hillary Clinton

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A new poll shows that Hillary Clinton is still far ahead of Donald Trump among New York voters — but she has some weak points.

Clinton holds a 21-point lead over Trump among likely New York voters in the Siena College poll, down from a 25-point lead one month ago.

But Clinton has some weaknesses. She is viewed unfavorably by just over half of voters and does not have much support beyond registered Democrats, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

This NPR News special will examine the characters of both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. The 2016 Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are the most unpopular candidates since modern polling began. But why is that the case?

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Local Democratic officials helped open a new Hillary Clinton election office in Syracuse on Saturday. Clinton recently called on every Republican in office to say if they agree with recent Donald Trump comments. Trump said U.S. generals have been reduced to rubble under President Barack Obama and Trump praised Russian President Vladimir Putin. Colleen Deacon, a Democrat running against Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) in the 24th Congressional District, called on Katko to voice his opinion.

Deacon says she does not agree with the idea that Katko is a moderate Republican.

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A new poll that finds Donald Trump badly trailing Hillary Clinton in the presidential race in New York could be good news for Democrats in the state Senate.

Trump’s supporters in New York had hoped that the state could be in play for the Queens native. But the latest poll from Siena College finds that Clinton, who has adopted New York as her home, is ahead of Trump by 30 points — 57 percent to 27 percent — in a two-way race.

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Republicans in central New York are still angry with Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) and his decision to back Democrat Hillary Clinton instead of Republican Donald Trump in the race for president.  

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) added his voice to a chorus of criticism regarding Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s comments to the Muslim parents of an Army captain killed in Iraq.

“We ought to revere our Gold Star mothers,” Schumer said. “We ought to praise them. We are to not be criticizing them. My heart goes out to these people who made the ultimate sacrifice and criticism of them is very, very wrong.”

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News (file photo)

Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) Tuesday became the first Republican member of Congress to say he will vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton for president in November. 

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo got his moment on the convention stage Thursday night before Hillary Clinton’s speech.

Cuomo delivered his speech before the prime time program began, around 7:30 p.m., and he started the speech by mentioning his father, and Mario Cuomo’s famous 1984 Tale of Two Cities speech at the San Francisco convention 32 years ago.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

It’s supposed to be Hillary Clinton’s convention, but the focus Monday was on her primary challenger, Bernie Sanders, and his delegates, who continue to stew over a WikiLeaks release of Democratic National Committee emails that showed favoritism to Clinton over Sanders.

In New York’s delegation, annoyed Sanders supporters attending the convention in Philadelphia struggled to even secure a room to meet in so they could discuss all that’s happened.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

New York state will have a big presence at this week’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Among the politicians who will speak from the podium, the state’s two senators.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Now that the Republican National Convention is over, the next step for Republicans, after the Democrats are done with their convention, is to begin the presidential general election campaign. The head of Trump’s New York campaign say he expects the state to be in play.

Buffalo businessman Carl Paladino says even though New York has many more Democrats than Republicans, Trump wants to compete against Hillary Clinton in his home state.

“We’re going to win big in Long Island and in upstate,” Paladino said. “We’re going to get crossover like you’ve never seen before.”

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, in a speech to New York’s delegates at the Republican National Convention, assailed Hillary Clinton for her husband’s extramarital affairs when he was president in the 1990s, saying she tried to shut the women up.

Giuliani, who dropped out of a race to challenge Clinton for the 2000 Senate race in New York, which she ultimately won, focused on a topic that so far has been avoided even on the convention floor — whether Clinton was culpable in covering up her husband’s sexual dalliances.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

New York’s delegation at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland heard from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich at their breakfast meeting Monday. Gingrich offered them a game plan for winning in New York state in November.

Former House Speaker, professor and now author of dystopic thrillers, Newt Gingrich spoke as an official Donald Trump surrogate. He offered the delegates what he called a game plan to win typically Democratic New York state away from Hillary Clinton in the presidential race. He says the political landscape is rapidly shifting, and New York City is key.

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As the race for the Democratic nomination for president comes to a close in the coming weeks, Syracuse supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders are still promoting their candidates.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton won resoundingly in New York's primary Tuesday, including in Onondaga County. But a look at the numbers shows that the county's results stand out in central New York.

Julia Botero / WRVO news

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s daughter, Chelsea Clinton, stopped in Watertown Monday to stump for her mother before New York's primary Tuesday.

Chelsea Clinton, who is expecting her second child this summer, told a room full of supporters at the IBEW Local 191 union hall, this will be the first presidential election she’ll be voting in as a mother.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Polls open at noon today in central and northern New York for one of the most contested presidential primaries in New York state history. Both registered Democrats and Republicans will choose who they want to see as their party’s standard bearer in the race for president. The big push now is to get supporters out to vote.

Jason Smith / WRVO News

Former President Bill Clinton has spent the last several weeks campaigning in New York for his wife, ahead of the state's primary April 19.

On the eve of the New York presidential primary, Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher talks with two area party chairs. Janet Burman, who heads up the Syracuse City Republican Committee, and Mark English, chair of the Onondaga County Democratic Committee.  They discuss the controversies and turmoils in the nominating process, the restrictive voting rules in New York State, and aspects of the candidates’ campaigns and positions.

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A poll from Siena College finds that Bernie Sanders has narrowed the gap with Hillary Clinton in the New York presidential primary race, but Clinton leads in key voting groups.

The poll finds Clinton ten points ahead of Sanders, at 52 percent to 42 percent, but Clinton is ahead in voter-rich New York City and the surrounding suburbs. The two are even in upstate, but only around one-quarter of total Democratic voters live there.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

A new poll finds that Bernie Sanders has narrowed the gap with Hillary Clinton among likely Democratic voters in the New York residential primary race, but Clinton leads in key voting regions.

The Siena College poll finds that while 52 percent of Democrats would vote for Hillary Clinton, compared to 42 percent for Bernie Sanders, Clinton is ahead in voter-rich New York City and surrounding suburbs. The two are even in upstate, but that represents just around one-quarter of total Democratic voters. Siena’s Steve Greenberg says there’s also an age divide between the two candidates.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Although he was stumping for Democratic primary voters in Syracuse Tuesday, presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders set his sights on Republican front-runner Donald Trump.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke at a packed arena in Albany Monday night, where he was interrupted by protesters numerous times.

Marguerite Jones / WSKG News

As he began a two-day campaign swing through upstate New York, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke to a very enthusiastic crowd of around 3,000 at an armory in Albany. He got some of the biggest cheers when he called for nationwide ban on hydrofracking.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News (file photo)

After campaigning in Rochester and Albany over the last few days, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump will bring his campaign to Rome on Tuesday. Trump will hold an event at Griffiss International Airport at 4:00 p.m.

Amika Osumi / WRVO News

Over one hundred Bernie Sanders supporters marched through downtown Syracuse Saturday. They rallied together with music and several chants in support of the Democratic presidential candidate.

Many of the marchers were young college students, a demographic Sanders has gathered large support from. But there were also plenty who are middle-aged locals, like Beth Totten.

“I believe he’s going to bring jobs back, he’s going to do a universal health care system; he’s really the guy we need leading us. He is very truthful, I mean even the pope loves him, right?” said Totten.

Michael Vadon / Flickr

After spending much of the last week in New York City, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is bringing his campaign to upstate New York this week, ahead of the state's primary April 19.

Hillary Clinton brings campaign to Rochester

Apr 9, 2016
WXXI News

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton made her first Rochester stop in the New York Primary campaign Friday night. The economy was a major theme.

Both Clinton and her Democratic rival, Bernie Sanders have been focusing a lot of attention on the economy, and that's especially key in upstate New York, which has been beset by manufacturing job losses in recent years.

During her speech at Monroe Community College, Clinton talked about the efforts at that college, as well as at the University of Rochester and RIT to help train the workforce.

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