Hydrilla

Researchers scope Cayuga Lake for invasive plant

Nov 24, 2016
Gabe Altieri / WSKG

In September, a class from Wells College was on Cayuga Lake near Aurora when someone noticed a non-native weed in the water. It was hydrilla, an invasive plant that can cause big problems.

Hillary Lambert with the Cayuga Lake Watershed is trying to figure out how widespread the hydrilla is before the lake gets even colder and freezes.

“If we let hydrilla take control, over several years time, it could make large areas of the shoreline impassable every summer,” she said.

Louisiana Sea Grant College Program Louisiana State University / Flickr

For years, the state Department of Environmental Conservation and other agencies have been trying to reduce the impact of invasive species like the Emerald Ash Borer and Asian carp. Last year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed into law the Invasive Species Prevention Act, requiring the DEC and state Department of Agriculture and Markets to come up with a plan to reduce the impact non-native plants and animals have on the state.

The agencies are now proposing regulations that prohibit knowingly selling, traveling with or introducing certain species into the state.

College students help fight invasive species

Aug 1, 2012
Louisiana Sea Grant College Program Louisiana State University

All summer long, the Department of Environmental Conservation is stationing college students at boat launches around New York with the mission to stop the spread of invasive species.

There’s another invasive species that’s threatening to destroy the habitat of numerous other plants and animals. This one lives underwater. It’s called hydrilla and it’s spreading through the Cayuga Inlet near the south end of Cayuga Lake. Ithaca’s mayor has already declared an environmental emergency and ordered all boat traffic to stop through Cayuga Inlet to try and stop the plant from spreading.