Independence Party

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Hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers may be left out of the Empire State's presidential primary this April because it's closed, meaning only registered Democrats and Republicans can participate. The New York League of Women Voters' legislative director Barbara Bartoletti said that leaves out voters who are registered under third parties.

"We want people to participate in their government," Bartoletti said." We want people to vote and its depressing that we have set up so many barriers in New York State to disallow all of the very well informed."

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has quietly accepted the endorsement of the state’s Independence Party, after the party met with no public notice in Albany on Friday morning.

The Democrat governor did not attend the brief Independence Party meeting in Albany, but speaking in Buffalo later, acknowledged the endorsement.

“I’ve accepted the endorsement and I’ll be running on their line,” Cuomo said. “I’m pleased with their endorsement.”

In this edition of the Campbell Conversations, Grant Reeher continues the discussion with Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee.  The governor frankly describes the political challenges he's encountered as governor, and the effects of his party switch after being elected.  He also discussed his state's relatively smooth roll-out of Obamacare, and his political future. 

In the first of two-part interview, Grant Reeher discusses the current level of conflict and polarization between the two parties with Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee.  Chafee is particularly well-suited as an observer of this problem--when in the U.S. Senate he was known as a moderate Republican.  He left the party following his service there, and successfully ran for governor as an independent.  He's now a Democrat.