injuries

A variety of new reconstructive and minimally invasive treatments are being used to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children.

Upstate University Hospital Urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky describes how he created a surgical procedure to restore a damaged urethra -- the tube through which urine leaves the body -- using a patient’s own tissue and avoiding the need for a tube implant.

How to survive the winter without getting injured

Feb 20, 2016
Steve Webel / Flickr

No matter if the winter is mild or strong, dry and icy, or wet and snowy, cold weather often tends to bring injuries with it.   

Although cold-weather-related injuries may seem inevitable, there are tips and tricks to staying out of the hospital this winter. Dr. Christopher McStay, the chief of operations in the department of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and the former chief of service for the Bellevue Hospital Emergency Department in New York City, speaks with us this week on “Take Care” on how to do this.

Cold, snow, ice & injuries

Feb 19, 2016

Often when there's a big snowstorm, reports of weather-related injuries -- and even deaths -- make the news. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Christopher McStay, Chief of Clinical Operations for the Emergency Department at the University of Colorado Hospital, and professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about winter-specific injuries and how to avoid and treat them.

This week: ADHD, winter concussions and dry skin

Dec 23, 2015

If your child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD,) it’s better to start medical treatment early, so the child keeps up with his or her peers, says Stephen Faraone, a distinguished professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

An expert in ADHD, Faraone explains its many facets, including its tendency to run in families, the reluctance of some people toward medication and the hopes for genetic research.

Also this week: winter head injuries, what to do about dry skin, and research into Christmas Tree Syndrome.

This week: hernia repair, Lyme disease and midlife changes

Jul 24, 2015

Hernias, which are potentially dangerous openings in the abdominal wall, can result from car wrecks and other injuries. Their treatment has changed in the past decade, says Dr. Moustafa Hassan, director of acute care surgery at Upstate University Hospital.

Home improvement can equal health risks

Apr 24, 2015
Collin Anderson / Flickr

As winter turns to spring, a homeowner's thoughts turns to home improvement. But those needed chores around the house and yard come with the risk of injury. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Ryan Stanton, emergency physician and medical director at University of Kentucky Good Samaritan Hospital about the most common home improvement injuries.

Vernon Dutton / Flickr

 

The American Nurses Association reports 8 out of 10 nurses say they frequently work with joint or back pain. The nursing profession has the highest rate of on-the-job injuries of any other in the country. According to many the solution to both problems: more nurses on staff at hospitals.

"The nurses, in many ways, are the last line of defense against harm to patients," John James, founder of Patient Safety America. His organization campaigns to lower the number of injuries to patients in the hospital.

Michelle Faust / WXXI

Three seniors in the nursing program at the SUNY College at Brockport follow professor Jennifer Chesebro through a long nondescript room with eight occupied hospital beds along the walls.

Chesebro addresses each patient by name, and handles them with the tender touch that she’s developed in 21 years of nursing.

Each patient has their own unique ailments for the students to practice treating, but they stare up with hard fixed plastic eyes. The patients in this room don’t respond to their caregivers — they’re mannequins.

Trysil / Flickr

The time to pull out the winter sporting gear has come, but with it comes the possibility of injury

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Navan Duggal discusses the strain winter sports can have on the body and what you can do to decrease the risk of injury. Duggal was chief of the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is currently in private practice at Syracuse Orthopedic Surgeons.

Why snow plus sports so often equals injuries

Dec 19, 2014

Winter sports are certainly popular in northern and central New York. But whether it’s skating, skiing or sledding, falling on the snow or ice is inevitable -- and can lead to injury. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Syracuse-based orthopedist Dr. Naven Duggal about the risks of winter sports and how to prevent injuries.

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New data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows New York state and local government employees experienced a much higher rate of injury and illness than workers in any other industry during 2012.

It may not be something you’ve ever considered, but a lot of the time, there’s an inherent risk associated with jobs in the public sector.

And, according to Nellie Brown, director of the workplace health and safety program at Cornell University, that has a big impact on statistics like these.

The BLS report states:

New York state's Workers' Compensation Board has started a sweeping effort to examine the system, and look at how it could more effectively meet the needs of injured workers and employers. It's in the midst of holding sessions where injured workers can express their opinions.

The second of three sessions was held yesterday in Syracuse, and allowed injured workers to chime in on the discussion in central New York. Fidel, Alejandro Velacqueis Perez was among those telling stories.

Ashley Hirtzel / WBFO

Special mouth guards and helmets marketed to help reduce concussions may not actually provide any additional protection for football players a new report claims. The findings are from a 2012 study that followed 1,332 high school athletes during a season.