Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin / via Flickr

The Lockheed Martin factory in suburban Syracuse was not on the list of factories the defense contractor announced Thursday it will close in efforts to reduce costs.

Workers in central New York could, though, be affected by the 3.5 percent workforce reduction the company also announced, which will equal about 4,000 jobs nationwide. The details of those layoffs will be finalized early next year, the company said in a release.

Lockheed Martin / via Flickr

Another 80 employees at Lockheed Martin's factory in suburban Syracuse, N.Y. and 65 in Owego, N.Y. have been told they're out of a job in the second round of the layoffs to hit the sites this year.

The plan to reduce the workforce in the defense contractor's Mission Systems and Training unit was announced on Oct. 16. In all, 587 workers lost their job in the unit nationwide.

Lockheed Martin / via Flickr

Lockheed Martin's radar and sensor facility just outside of Syracuse is safe for at least a year, but the company was close to closing it and relocating jobs, according to a news report.

The Post-Standard this morning cited unnamed sources and an internal document saying the defense contractor was in serious talks to shutter the facility in Salina and move the jobs there to other locations.

Lockheed Martin / via Flickr

Workers at Lockheed Martin sites in central New York and the Southern Tier are being hit with another round of layoffs, but the company says the move is not tied to the government shutdown that just ended.

A total of 600 workers across the country will be out of a job early next month, according to the defense contractor.

Lockheed Martin / via Flickr

Defense contractor Lockheed Martin has laid 114 workers at its site in suburban Syracuse and 25 in Owego, as part of the approximately 300 job cuts announced last month.

The 139 employees will be out of a job on August 15.

The reductions are in Lockheed's Mission Systems and Training division. The Salina and Owego plants work primarily in radar and sensor technology. The affected positions are mostly in engineering and program management.

courtesy / MEADS-AMD

Money for a defense contract that supports several hundred jobs at a plant in central New York has found its way back into a federal spending plan.

courtesy / MEADS-AMD

Money for the final year of a missile system that supports a few hundred jobs for a defense contractor near Syracuse has been removed from Congress' defense budget. But Lockheed Martin is keeping optimistic that the money could find its way back into the budget.