medical reserach

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Without sustainable federal investment in medical research, innovation in the field will be stunted say academic leaders. Colleagues from across the country join in their appeal to Congress.

New York medical school administrators join 17 others in a recent open letter in the Journal Science Translational Medicine.  The letter says unstable funding for biomedical research drives investigators out of the country.

Susumu Komatsu / Flickr

A study looking into ways to reduce the plaque that causes Alzheimer’s disease, wants to attract more African American participants. The clinical trial is taking place in Rochester, Buffalo, and several locations near New York City.

African Americans are twice as likely as Caucasians to develop Alzheimer’s disease. University of Rochester Medical Center Dr. Anton Porsteinsson says medical researchers don’t exactly know why.

MTSOFAN / Flickr

Alzheimer’s disease advocates in central New York are joining the national calling for more money to be spent on treatment research and a cure for the disease.

The federal government currently spends half a billion dollars a year on finding a cure for Alzheimer’s and it has left some potential cures without the money to fund trials that lead to FDA approval.

Diagnostic imaging: The eye for the inside

Feb 9, 2014
Rob! / Flickr

Like something straight out of science fiction, the use of diagnostic imaging allows doctors to “see” inside the human body without physically opening it up. X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds and MRI are some of the most common kinds, but what is the difference between all of them? What situation calls for what kind of diagnostic imaging, and is there any danger in using them?

To answer these basic questions, Dr. Scott Buckingham joins us this week on Take Care. Dr. Buckingham, of CRA Medical Imaging in Syracuse, is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology and has also had training in vascular and interventional radiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview Dr. Scott Buckingham.

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Getting your flu shot this year may do more than just protect you from a runny nose and sore throat. A study published earlier this year in the Journal for the American Medical Association suggests that flu vaccinations may reduce the risk of heart disease.

Dr. Charlie Lowenstein is the chief of cardiology at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) in western New York. He says no one really knows why the flu can be bad for your heart, but there are some strong theories suggesting it can be.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Biomedical researchers across central and western New York are getting a new piece of sophisticated machinery that will allow them to get a closer look at the way cells and proteins interact.

Officials announced a $2 million federal grant this week that will allow a consortium of six upstate colleges and universities to buy what's called an 800-megahertz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer.  

Biomedical researchers from across the world will converge in Syracuse Friday to discuss a disease that is usually associated with tropical climates. Dengue fever, which is one of the leading causes of illness and death in the tropics, has turned up in the United States.