melanoma

The dangers of sun exposure and melanoma

Jun 25, 2016
Sunny_mjx / Flickr

A day on the lake, an afternoon of yard work, watching a baseball game; these are all events that can put us in direct sunlight. But with a 200 percent increase in melanoma diagnoses since the 1970s, we may need to take more precaution when it comes to the sun.

Fortunately, there have been improvements in diagnosis and treatment over the past few decades.This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Lynn Schuchter explains the rise in melanoma and gives us the latest on treatment and prevention. Schuchter is the medicine division chief of hematology-oncology at Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.  She also leads the melanoma program at the university, and is a professor of hematology-oncology.

This week: melanoma, family therapy and corporal punishment

Sep 30, 2015

The deadliest skin cancer, melanoma, can affect the liver and brain in its later stages, explains Dr. Ramsay Farah, division chief of dermatology at Upstate Medical University. This happened to former President Jimmy Carter.

Caused by pigment-producing cells called melanocytes, melanoma is best treated when caught early, says Farah, who notes the significance of irregular moles and the need for regular skin exams. Farah also details Carter's cutting-edge treatment, which awakens the body’s immune system to fight the melanoma.

Oscar Rohena / Flickr

With early detection and treatment, melanoma is nearly 100 percent curable.  But for patients with advanced stages of melanoma, this skin cancer is often regarded as one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Now, new advances in treatment therapies have provided dramatic improvements for those whose melanoma has spread.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about how melanoma is diagnosed and the variety of treatments now available.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

Melanoma treatments advancing rapidly

Sep 13, 2013

Lorraine Rapp: If you would, walk us through what happens when a person finds out their mole or growth is malignant. Who makes that diagnosis and what are the first steps taken once a person gets the diagnosis.

Governor Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders have agreed to limit the use of tanning beds by teenagers.

The bill will ban children 16 years and under from going to tanning salons. Seventeen-year-olds will still be allowed to use tanning beds with written permission from their parents.

gweggyphoto via Flickr

The American Cancer Society and other health groups are pressing for a law in New York state that would ban anyone under the age of 18 from using a tanning salon. They argue the growing risk of cancer to young people is too great a threat to ignore.