meningitis

NIAID / Flickr

You do everything you can to protect your children and this includes vaccinating against any illness they might encounter. Most states mandate that your child gets the meningitis ACWY vaccine. While this will protect your child against most strands of meningitis, it doesn’t account for bacterial meningitis or meningitis B.

Patti Wukovits, a registered nurse, thought she had her daughter covered when she received the vaccine mandated by New York state law. Wukovits’ daughter Kimberly came home from school with common symptoms of the flu, the next day she was admitted to the hospital for meningitis B. Kimberly passed away three days before her high school graduation. Patti established the Kimberly Coffey Foundation in her honor.

Joining us is Patti Wukovits and Dr. Allan Tunkel, associate dean for medical education at the Warren Alpert School of Brown University, to discuss not only Kimberly’s story, but the effects this disease can have on the young adult population.

The dangers of meningitis: one mother's story

Oct 6, 2017
Partha S. Sahana / Flickr

Meningitis is a disease most people are vaccinated against, and is often treatable if contracted. But it's still a very serious disease, and in some cases it can be deadly. This week on Take Care, WRVO's health and wellness show, we hear the story of one woman who lost her daughter to meningitis. 

This week: shingles, meningitis, eye research

Dec 8, 2016

People who had chicken pox or the chicken pox vaccine as children can undergo a reactivation of that disease’s virus in adulthood and wind up with shingles.

Researching ways to prevent and treat shingles, which brings a rash and possibly debilitating nerve pain, is the work of Jennifer Moffat, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Upstate University Hosptial. She describes how shingles, most common in adults over 50, can affect people with weakened immune systems.

Gordon Lew / Flickr

This is the time of year health officials recommend families make sure children’s vaccinations are up to date so they can go to school in September. This year, there is one new requirement change in New York state.

The new vaccination rules affect older children, according to Upstate Medical University infectious disease specialist Dr. Joe Domachowske. The required shot is first given before seventh grade, then followed up with a booster, and will protect children from the sometimes deadly form of bacterial meningitis.