Native Americans

Monica Sandreczki / WSKG

At an All Nations Powwow at the Portal Institute in Susquehanna, Pa., tribes of Native Americans from across the United States gathered to celebrate their traditions and support a struggling tribe. The pow wow is put on as a benefit for the Lakota people from South Dakota.

Tribes from all over the eastern United States and Midwest were gathered in the middle of the Pennsylvania woods.

A string of male and female dancers in vivid color step and bounce in time to the drum.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The transformation of the former Sainte Marie among the Iroquois museum on Onondaga Lake into a Haudenosaunee heritage center continues. Museum experts are in the midst of reprogramming the focus of the museum and are looking for help from the public.

Rick Hill is a guest curator working on the interpretive script for the new Skä•noñh Great Law of Peace Center. He says it’s going to be a different kind of museum.

Keith Allison / Flickr

While the debate continues between the Oneida Indian Nation and the Washington Redskins regarding the team's name and mascot, in upstate New York, several institutions faced similar decisions more than a decade ago and did change their names.

Christina Alexander was the president of the sophomore class at Sherburne-Earlville Central School in rural Chenango County when the student body decided to retire its Indian mascot, while leaving the team's name - the Marauders -- unchanged.

Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign

This week begins a year long campaign in New York that focuses on the Two Row Wampum, a treaty between the Haudenosaunee, also known as the Iroquois Nation, and some of the first settlers of New York state. The idea is educate, advocate, and create a better relationship Native Americans and New Yorkers.

John Weeks interviews Frank Bivel and his idea to put a program together that would further explain the lifestyle of a Native American. Bivel discusses the details of his plan and how he hopes to make the life of a Native American physically come to life to modern day people by working with the same resources Native Americans once did.

 

Originally aired on March 8th, 1985.