nature

November's Open

Nov 10, 2016

In this archived broadcast from November 13, 1992, John Weeks discusses the beauty of November, despite the loss of life that comes with the beginning of winter.  Weeks remarks on how the fall and winter are necessary to bring about spring and tells a series of anecdotes about his discovery of various bird nests in the late autumn.

The Loon

Oct 12, 2016

In this archived broadcast from October 9, 1987, John Weeks discusses the common loon and the decrease in the species population.  Weeks touches on the causes of this decrease, the increased interest in the bird, loon behavior, and its incredible voice, including his own account of hearing a loon song.

In this archived broadcast from September 16, 1988, John Weeks talks about the negative perception surrounding hawks and owls, particularly the red tailed hawk.  Weeks talks about the bird's history and his own relationship with attempting to protect the species.

In this archived broadcast from June 25, 1992, John Weeks speaks about bird songs and their qualities.  Songs by different species of thrush, wrens, thrasher and others are interspersed throughout the talk.  Weeks examines each song, touching on qualities such as tone and energy.

A Study in Bird Nesting

Jun 8, 2016
Dan Dangler / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 10, 1993, John Weeks discusses the observations he made during a study of a local wetland.  These observations include several notes on the nesting habits of over a dozen different bird species. 

Flying Architects

Jun 1, 2016
Henry T. McLin / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 7, 1991, John Weeks discusses nature's flying architects, commonly known as birds.  Weeks covers the nest building of several species including Baltimore orioles and hummingbirds.

Mice

May 27, 2016
Michael Becker / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 27, 2005, John Weeks discusses the role mice play in maintaining an ecosystem.  Weeks goes into detail on how mice provide meals for several predator species and how this makes mice important members of the natural world.

Celebrating Nature's Art

May 25, 2016
covrazio / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 23, 2003, John Weeks discusses some of the local nature art exhibits.  Weeks talks about the Great Swamp Conservancy and the Sterling Nature Center, among other topics.

Strange Sounds of Nature

May 20, 2016
Tom Moseley / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 21, 2004, John Weeks reviews the strange sounds one might hear on a spring evening.  Weeks goes into depth on the calls of the pie-billed grebe, the woodcock, the rough grouse and more.

Thank you for your interest in David Sibley's visit to Syracuse. Unfortunately, tickets are sold out. Please call (315) 312-3690 to be added to our waiting list.

An Episode with Deer

May 18, 2016
Andrew Reding / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 17, 1991, John Weeks recalls an encounter he had with several deer while walking a nature trail. 

Nature Trails

May 18, 2016
Don Rogers / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 20, 2005, John Weeks discusses local nature trails.  Weeks touches on his hand in constructing the trail designs and gives accounts of experiences he's had on these trails. 

The Aftermath of Winter

May 13, 2016

In this archived broadcast from May 9, 2003, John Weeks talks about the aftermath of winter.  Weeks remarks on the visible marks that winter leaves behind each year and how that effects the natural world. 

Salamanders

May 6, 2016
Fyn Kynd Photography / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 2, 2003, John Weeks discusses salamanders.  Weeks goes into detail on the different species living in New York and talks about some encounters he has had over the years.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

There’s a new nature sanctuary in Onondaga County. The Nature Conservancy has acquired more than 200 acres of undeveloped land along the Seneca River in Baldwinsville.

Jim Brickett / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 10, 1987, John Weeks details his trip down the East Coast for the National Science Teachers Association in Washington, D.C. He speaks about various natural landmarks that he came across including the Barrier Dunes, nesting ospreys, and Chesapeake Bay.

In this archived broadcast from April 8, 1988, John Weeks discusses the mating rituals of salamanders.  Weeks speaks about the appearance and behavior of salamanders, and delves deep into the mating cycles of salamanders.

The Goldfinch

Aug 30, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 31, 1990, John Weeks talks about the hatching season of birds. He goes into detail on the Goldfinch and how they play a role in the environment. He also talks about the uniqueness of this bird and how and why it is different from others.

Liz Truskowski

Eight thousand acres of pristine wetlands just north of Watertown in Jefferson County are open to visitors until Sunday. For most of the year, the Perch River Wildlife Management Area is off-limits to the public. The area is a breeding and nesting ground for threatened and endangered birds like bald eagles and black terns.

In this archived broadcast from June 14, 1991, John Weeks talks about the sounds of nature. He goes into detail about how the sounds of the forest give us an idea about what is going on in nature and in the forest. without the sound of birds, animals and the wind we loose the important of nature. He talks about how it is hard for him to hear the sounds of nature and he talks about how he needs a hearing aid to hear the sounds in the woods.

In this archived broadcast from April 25, 1987, John Weeks talks about his experience with crows and great horned owls one day at Rice Creek. He goes into detail about both birds and what makes them unique.

In this archived broadcast from May, 2, 1991, John Weeks talks about migration and nesting. He goes into great detail on birds and the nesting time of year. He narrates his walk and pioneer trail that he went on. He talks about Song Sparrows and how they use sound to get the attention of other birds around them. He runs through different birds and the sounds that make them unique.

In this archived broadcast from September  25, 1992, John Weeks talks about how he has 33 years of professional service and had more than 500 episodes of the Nature Of Things. He was awarded the conservation educator of the year and how he was surprised to get this award.  Weeks also talks about someone else that he meets at the award ceremony.

In this archived broadcast, Nature Centers Coming Of Age, John Weeks talks about the spring like conditions that he traveled through on his way to Ithaca for the maple festival. He tells about how he was selected to lead the nature walk and he talks about how thousands of people are at these events typically. Weeks also talks about how more places are visited more because of certain events. He also tells about the different nature centers.

This archived broadcast, Like A Cock Grouse Drumming In An Open Field is from November 4, 1988. It talks about how nature is a complex energy system but it is also interesting and beautiful. Everything flows from quirks of energy. It talks about the landfill problems and how communities notice the landfill that is in their backyards and what they need to do about these problems.

John Weeks talks about bellwethers. In previous episodes he used the term, but never actually defined it. He reveals that term refers to a sheep, usually a gelded male. He wears a bell around his neck and is a leader for a flock of sheep and an indicator for the whereabouts of the flock in extremely foggy weather conditions. This was all he could find about the term and it was not even in the encyclopedia or other resources he looked in for the term. He had to “wing it” from there and elaborated on the definition based on his own experiences.

This is an archived broadcast from October 28, 1988. John Weeks talks about where insects go in the winter and he talks about how he use to teach a class in CNY and every year he would explain to the students where the insects go in the winter. He talks a lot about butterflies and some other insects hibernating.

In this, broadcast from 1988, John Weeks talks about how insects act during the winter. He mentions that some insects hibernate during the winter while other insects do not. He talks about the different bugs and then he tells a story about when he used to occasionally teach in Central New York and talked about some things that he asked his students. Weeks goes into detail about some of the insects especially the caterpillar.

John Weeks informs us about one of the most intelligent bears, the black bear. This bear was known to pioneers as attacking their mammals and taking them as food. He talks about fear he felt while in the woods. While making his way back home on a camping trip he heard a lot of noise, and thought it was a pig. Only the end trail of a bear was left behind when he went to the location where the scuffling was heard. He describes bears as a big appetite wrapped up in a powerful body. He found that even a dead bear is hard to handle because of its weight.

John Weeks discusses reliving taking trips down roads to see the wildlife we will not see until next season as the weather gets colder.  Stopping at major vistas he has previously visited he can always predict what he is going to see. As the hunting season carries on there are more white tail deer seen during the day. Deer are most interesting during these days as winter sets in. There is always a tad bit of new learning or reinforcing of something he thought he knew at these vistas. Weeks tells us of his interesting findings.

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