nature

April Sunshine

Apr 11, 2017

April is truly a superlative month through the eyes of John Weeks. In honor of the months rare sunlight, Weeks expresses his appreciation for the lively rebirth of nature produced by the golden rays throughout the month. This episode originally aired April 8, 1993.

100 Miles of Spring

Apr 5, 2017

In this archived broadcast from April 3, 1987, John Weeks discusses temperature fluctuations and recites Henry David Thoreau to describe the constant changes, new growth and longer days of spring.

A Conversation About Feeder Birds

Jan 18, 2017

In this archived broadcast from January 16, 1987, John Weeks reads a phone conversation he had while writing newspaper articles.  The caller and Weeks discuss birds, trees, and nature, noting their different qualities including feeding, nesting, lifestyles, and the territories they inhabit.

Ruth Geach / Flickr

Have you ever wondered why we use mistletoe, wreaths, and other ornaments to celebrate the holiday season? Nature may have more of an influence then you might think. Host John Weeks tells nature's holiday story on this archived episode of "Nature of Things," originally aired December 20, 1985. 

November's Open

Nov 10, 2016

In this archived broadcast from November 13, 1992, John Weeks discusses the beauty of November, despite the loss of life that comes with the beginning of winter.  Weeks remarks on how the fall and winter are necessary to bring about spring and tells a series of anecdotes about his discovery of various bird nests in the late autumn.

The Loon

Oct 12, 2016

In this archived broadcast from October 9, 1987, John Weeks discusses the common loon and the decrease in the species population.  Weeks touches on the causes of this decrease, the increased interest in the bird, loon behavior, and its incredible voice, including his own account of hearing a loon song.

In this archived broadcast from September 16, 1988, John Weeks talks about the negative perception surrounding hawks and owls, particularly the red tailed hawk.  Weeks talks about the bird's history and his own relationship with attempting to protect the species.

In this archived broadcast from June 25, 1992, John Weeks speaks about bird songs and their qualities.  Songs by different species of thrush, wrens, thrasher and others are interspersed throughout the talk.  Weeks examines each song, touching on qualities such as tone and energy.

A Study in Bird Nesting

Jun 8, 2016
Dan Dangler / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 10, 1993, John Weeks discusses the observations he made during a study of a local wetland.  These observations include several notes on the nesting habits of over a dozen different bird species. 

Flying Architects

Jun 1, 2016
Henry T. McLin / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 7, 1991, John Weeks discusses nature's flying architects, commonly known as birds.  Weeks covers the nest building of several species including Baltimore orioles and hummingbirds.

Mice

May 27, 2016
Michael Becker / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 27, 2005, John Weeks discusses the role mice play in maintaining an ecosystem.  Weeks goes into detail on how mice provide meals for several predator species and how this makes mice important members of the natural world.

Celebrating Nature's Art

May 25, 2016
covrazio / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 23, 2003, John Weeks discusses some of the local nature art exhibits.  Weeks talks about the Great Swamp Conservancy and the Sterling Nature Center, among other topics.

Strange Sounds of Nature

May 20, 2016
Tom Moseley / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 21, 2004, John Weeks reviews the strange sounds one might hear on a spring evening.  Weeks goes into depth on the calls of the pie-billed grebe, the woodcock, the rough grouse and more.

Thank you for your interest in David Sibley's visit to Syracuse. Unfortunately, tickets are sold out. Please call (315) 312-3690 to be added to our waiting list.

An Episode with Deer

May 18, 2016
Andrew Reding / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 17, 1991, John Weeks recalls an encounter he had with several deer while walking a nature trail. 

Nature Trails

May 18, 2016
Don Rogers / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 20, 2005, John Weeks discusses local nature trails.  Weeks touches on his hand in constructing the trail designs and gives accounts of experiences he's had on these trails. 

The Aftermath of Winter

May 13, 2016

In this archived broadcast from May 9, 2003, John Weeks talks about the aftermath of winter.  Weeks remarks on the visible marks that winter leaves behind each year and how that effects the natural world. 

Salamanders

May 6, 2016
Fyn Kynd Photography / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 2, 2003, John Weeks discusses salamanders.  Weeks goes into detail on the different species living in New York and talks about some encounters he has had over the years.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

There’s a new nature sanctuary in Onondaga County. The Nature Conservancy has acquired more than 200 acres of undeveloped land along the Seneca River in Baldwinsville.

Saffron Blaze / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 15, 1988, John Weeks discusses the virtues of roadside nature watching.  Weeks talks about the sights of spring that can easily be found from your vehicle. 

In this archived broadcast from April 18, 1987, John Weeks continues to discuss his trip on the East Coast.  Weeks discusses his visit Bombay Hook, touching on the wildlife he spotted and giving a brief history of the refuge.

Jim Brickett / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 10, 1987, John Weeks details his trip down the East Coast for the National Science Teachers Association in Washington, D.C. He speaks about various natural landmarks that he came across including the Barrier Dunes, nesting ospreys, and Chesapeake Bay.

In this archived broadcast from April 8, 1988, John Weeks discusses the mating rituals of salamanders.  Weeks speaks about the appearance and behavior of salamanders, and delves deep into the mating cycles of salamanders.

Julia Botero / WRVO news

Trees in the North Country are clinging to the last of their leaves. In Alexandria Bay, you can take a walk to admire what remains of fall foliage at Otter Creek Preserve. The trail is now open to the public for the first time. It snakes through more than a hundred acres of woods, wetlands, shrub and grasses.

The Goldfinch

Aug 30, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 31, 1990, John Weeks talks about the hatching season of birds. He goes into detail on the Goldfinch and how they play a role in the environment. He also talks about the uniqueness of this bird and how and why it is different from others.

A rare chance for birding on Perch River

Aug 29, 2015
Liz Truskowski

Eight thousand acres of pristine wetlands just north of Watertown in Jefferson County are open to visitors until Sunday. For most of the year, the Perch River Wildlife Management Area is off-limits to the public. The area is a breeding and nesting ground for threatened and endangered birds like bald eagles and black terns.

In this archived broadcast from June 14, 1991, John Weeks talks about the sounds of nature. He goes into detail about how the sounds of the forest give us an idea about what is going on in nature and in the forest. without the sound of birds, animals and the wind we loose the important of nature. He talks about how it is hard for him to hear the sounds of nature and he talks about how he needs a hearing aid to hear the sounds in the woods.

In this archived broadcast from March 20, 1987, John Weeks talks with John Rodgers who is co founder of the Upstate Bluebird Society. He interviews Rodgers on bluebird boxes and why they are making them. They talk about how important the nest boxes are to the environment and the Bluebirds. He speaks about how not only Bluebird's use these nests but many other birds do as well.

Spring Time Episodes

May 13, 2015

In this archived broadcast from April 29, 1990, John Weeks talks about the coming of spring and how fast it happens. He talks about the different birds of the spring and how spring goes by so fast because of the transition into summer that sometimes people don't see the beauty in it.

In this archived broadcast from May 25, 1990, John Weeks talks about he talks about how the birds of the spring prepare for the summer and how they nest. He also talks about the song of the birds. He goes into detail about a time that he was bird watching and examined certain birds.

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