Nature of Things

Diana Robinson / Flickr

When it comes to wildlife, Africa is plentiful--home to some of the largest creatures known to man. In this archived broadcast of the "Nature of Things" from January 13, 1984, host John Weeks speaks with Dr. Jack Calvert about his adventure through Africa. 

Anthony Quintano / Flickr

With winter underway, an archived broadcast of the "Nature of Things" from February 3, 1984 helps explain how lake effect storms form. Host John Weeks and weather expert Dr. Alfred Stam, dive into the science behind it, while also sharing some fun facts. Find out the only other region in the world, besides the Finger Lakes, that may experience lake effect storms. 

November's Open

Nov 10, 2016

In this archived broadcast from November 13, 1992, John Weeks discusses the beauty of November, despite the loss of life that comes with the beginning of winter.  Weeks remarks on how the fall and winter are necessary to bring about spring and tells a series of anecdotes about his discovery of various bird nests in the late autumn.

The Loon

Oct 12, 2016

In this archived broadcast from October 9, 1987, John Weeks discusses the common loon and the decrease in the species population.  Weeks touches on the causes of this decrease, the increased interest in the bird, loon behavior, and its incredible voice, including his own account of hearing a loon song.

In this archived broadcast from September 16, 1988, John Weeks talks about the negative perception surrounding hawks and owls, particularly the red tailed hawk.  Weeks talks about the bird's history and his own relationship with attempting to protect the species.

In this archived broadcast from June 29, 1990, John Weeks talks about tulip trees and the Baltimore oriole. He gives a brief history of both species and their modern day roles in the natural world.

In this archived broadcast from June 25, 1992, John Weeks speaks about bird songs and their qualities.  Songs by different species of thrush, wrens, thrasher and others are interspersed throughout the talk.  Weeks examines each song, touching on qualities such as tone and energy.

Saffron Blaze / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 15, 1988, John Weeks discusses the virtues of roadside nature watching.  Weeks talks about the sights of spring that can easily be found from your vehicle. 

In this archived broadcast from April 18, 1987, John Weeks continues to discuss his trip on the East Coast.  Weeks discusses his visit Bombay Hook, touching on the wildlife he spotted and giving a brief history of the refuge.

Jim Brickett / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 10, 1987, John Weeks details his trip down the East Coast for the National Science Teachers Association in Washington, D.C. He speaks about various natural landmarks that he came across including the Barrier Dunes, nesting ospreys, and Chesapeake Bay.

In this archived broadcast from April 8, 1988, John Weeks discusses the mating rituals of salamanders.  Weeks speaks about the appearance and behavior of salamanders, and delves deep into the mating cycles of salamanders.

The Goldfinch

Aug 30, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 31, 1990, John Weeks talks about the hatching season of birds. He goes into detail on the Goldfinch and how they play a role in the environment. He also talks about the uniqueness of this bird and how and why it is different from others.

Golden Pastures of July

Jul 1, 2015

In this archived broadcast from July 5, 1991, John Weeks talks about the month of July and how summer is established in July. He talks about the trees and plants and how they change in July. He talks about many different and unique colors that appear in the month of July and how those colors change and develop on different types of flowers.

In this archived broadcast from July 12, 1991, John Weeks talks about the Cicero swamp and how the environment and the harvest balance out. He stresses the importance of keeping the environment healthy and he also talks about logging and taking up land.

In this archived broadcast from October 11th, 1990, John Weeks discusses what makes leaves green and what causes them to change colors. As leaves grow and change until they fall of during Autumn, an intricate and important cycle has occurred. He describes the different colors and what they signify.

In this archived broadcast from October 2nd, 1992, John Weeks talks about a conference he attend in Lake George for the New York State Outdoor Education Association. He used the trip to the conference as an excuse to roadside nature watch. He describes the colors he sees at the leaves show signs of beginning to change.

John Weeks discusses his devotion to the environment. He explains how caring about water, food, and atmosphere now can improve the future. It is all linked together and we have a great amount of control for  what will happen in the future.

South Carolina Sunrise

Sep 11, 2014

John Weeks describes the sounds of nature and the animals that come out of the woods as the sun rises. He comments on how the activity level of nature changes as the sun comes out.

John Weeks takes a walk through the woods and describes the different birds he hears and what their songs mean. He discusses the different pitches of the birds as they interact with each other.

John Weeks continues the story of a maple tree near his house. He describes how the tree was cut and how old the tree was. He tells the story of the trees life and growth. He explains even though trees offer shade and beauty, they are much more important than that.

John Weeks discusses visiting home and returning to sentimental places. He comments on all of the changes since his last visit. The changes in nature offer a look into what the environment will be like for future generations.

John Weeks tells a story about a tree close to his house. He appreciates this tree because it shades his house from the hottest days of the summer. The tree was damaged earlier in it's life and never recovered. The tree might be cut down for a highway.

John Weeks talks about different kinds of birds, especially robins, and the fruits they eat. Fruit is important this time of year as a main source for the energy they need to migrate in the Fall. Their behavior changes towards the end of the summer as they prepare for their long flight.

John Weeks explains how he views nature as art and compares it to a painting. He describes how it changes throughout the day and how the height of the sun is key to the "perfect picture." The height of the sun and the presence or lack of clouds create different hues of colors and shadows that create contrast.

John Weeks talks with director of recreation and public programs, Bob Geraci, about the different parks in Onondaga county. They address how the various parks are classified and different activities that go on at each one. 

John Weeks talks about the approaching fall season and the summer sunlight cycle. He discusses the relationship between the sun and plants and how that changes as we go through the different seasons.

Natural Insect Control

Aug 11, 2014

John Weeks discusses different kinds of birds and their foraging habits that he witnesses in his own yard. He talks about how many trips they make in a day from their nest to the yard and how with each trip, they are acting as a form of insect control. He argues that birds are better to depend on for insect control because insects do not develop an immunity to them.

John Weeks tells a story about a woman who found a Heron in her yard. He talks about the various types of Herons which are often unknown by many people. Each Heron differs in size and color to help it blend in to specific surroundings.

As The Earth Turns

Aug 5, 2014

John Weeks talks about his hometown of Albion, NY. He reflects on what it was like when he lived there and how it has changed from what he remembers. He discusses how people who live there now see the town differently because their experience is different due to the world turning and the seasons changing.

John Weeks discusses how the different predators and prey find their food. He also talks about how different animals communicate and warn each other of danger. He expresses that upon entering the woods, a person never knows what just occurred between the creatures that make up the forest.

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