Nature of Things

In this archived broadcast from October 11th, 1990, John Weeks discusses what makes leaves green and what causes them to change colors. As leaves grow and change until they fall of during Autumn, an intricate and important cycle has occurred. He describes the different colors and what they signify.

In this archived broadcast from October 2nd, 1992, John Weeks talks about a conference he attend in Lake George for the New York State Outdoor Education Association. He used the trip to the conference as an excuse to roadside nature watch. He describes the colors he sees at the leaves show signs of beginning to change.

John Weeks discusses his devotion to the environment. He explains how caring about water, food, and atmosphere now can improve the future. It is all linked together and we have a great amount of control for  what will happen in the future.

South Carolina Sunrise

Sep 11, 2014

John Weeks describes the sounds of nature and the animals that come out of the woods as the sun rises. He comments on how the activity level of nature changes as the sun comes out.

John Weeks takes a walk through the woods and describes the different birds he hears and what their songs mean. He discusses the different pitches of the birds as they interact with each other.

John Weeks continues the story of a maple tree near his house. He describes how the tree was cut and how old the tree was. He tells the story of the trees life and growth. He explains even though trees offer shade and beauty, they are much more important than that.

John Weeks discusses visiting home and returning to sentimental places. He comments on all of the changes since his last visit. The changes in nature offer a look into what the environment will be like for future generations.

John Weeks tells a story about a tree close to his house. He appreciates this tree because it shades his house from the hottest days of the summer. The tree was damaged earlier in it's life and never recovered. The tree might be cut down for a highway.

John Weeks talks about different kinds of birds, especially robins, and the fruits they eat. Fruit is important this time of year as a main source for the energy they need to migrate in the Fall. Their behavior changes towards the end of the summer as they prepare for their long flight.

John Weeks explains how he views nature as art and compares it to a painting. He describes how it changes throughout the day and how the height of the sun is key to the "perfect picture." The height of the sun and the presence or lack of clouds create different hues of colors and shadows that create contrast.

John Weeks talks with director of recreation and public programs, Bob Geraci, about the different parks in Onondaga county. They address how the various parks are classified and different activities that go on at each one. 

John Weeks talks about the approaching fall season and the summer sunlight cycle. He discusses the relationship between the sun and plants and how that changes as we go through the different seasons.

Natural Insect Control

Aug 11, 2014

John Weeks discusses different kinds of birds and their foraging habits that he witnesses in his own yard. He talks about how many trips they make in a day from their nest to the yard and how with each trip, they are acting as a form of insect control. He argues that birds are better to depend on for insect control because insects do not develop an immunity to them.

John Weeks tells a story about a woman who found a Heron in her yard. He talks about the various types of Herons which are often unknown by many people. Each Heron differs in size and color to help it blend in to specific surroundings.

As The Earth Turns

Aug 5, 2014

John Weeks talks about his hometown of Albion, NY. He reflects on what it was like when he lived there and how it has changed from what he remembers. He discusses how people who live there now see the town differently because their experience is different due to the world turning and the seasons changing.

John Weeks discusses how the different predators and prey find their food. He also talks about how different animals communicate and warn each other of danger. He expresses that upon entering the woods, a person never knows what just occurred between the creatures that make up the forest.

Just One Move Road Trip

Nov 14, 2013

John Weeks discusses the change in a duck’s body from season to season. He recognizes the differentiations between female ducks and male ducks. He observes ducks playing in a pond before these ponds freeze due to the cold weather. He observes other animals that will be in hiding very soon as winter is approaching rapidly.

This episode of Nature of Things was originally aired November 21st, 1991.

John Weeks discusses reliving taking trips down roads to see the wildlife we will not see until next season as the weather gets colder.  Stopping at major vistas he has previously visited he can always predict what he is going to see. As the hunting season carries on there are more white tail deer seen during the day. Deer are most interesting during these days as winter sets in. There is always a tad bit of new learning or reinforcing of something he thought he knew at these vistas. Weeks tells us of his interesting findings.

John Weeks looks back on an old Nature of Things program where he reviewed an old past time he calls cruising for wildlife. He's been cruising for wildlife for the past 50 years and talks about the number of kills he found while on the road. He was so interested that he was able to find out the reason for the casualty by observing the animal. Though it may sound gruesome it was yet very educational and he takes us down the evolution of that journey.

This episode was originally aired October 25th, 1991.

John Weeks recalls his trip to Skaneateles Lake. He describes to us what the lake looks like and the troubles he endured during this venture. He tells us about the mountains he climbed and the magnificent red and white oaks he saw while trying to his way back until a motorist rescued them and returned them to the doorstep they started at.

This episode of Nature of Things was originally aired on November 8th, 1991.

The Legend & Audubon

Oct 29, 2013

John Weeks discusses his reaction to an article in The National Inquirer about Audubon. The article talks about pioneer Audubon killing thousands of birds for sport. Many were shocked by this startling revelation but because Weeks has read portions of Audubon’s diaries in the past he was not surprised at all. It is hard to put ourselves in the lives of a pioneer during hunting season in the 1780s. Living in an era where hunting skill was vital to successful living Audubon’s actions were typical of his day though.

John Weeks discusses the commonality of the red tail hawk and the open territory to hunt for these birds in the wild. His continues to talk about his personal observation of the red tail and hunting for them.

This episode was originally aired on September 16th, 1988

Fifteenth Anniversary

Jun 17, 2013

John Weeks reflects of the previous fifteen years of this program. He shares his experiences along his journey and responds to negative criticism.

Powerline Bird Watching

Jun 20, 2012

John Weeks explains that keeping an eye out for birds while driving can be both relaxing and informative. The power lines bordering highways provide an abundance of opportunities to sight beautiful birds. Bird watching in the car can be a good way to observe local nature without trekking through rough terrain.

The Vernal Apple Tree

May 29, 2012

John Weeks explains his affection for the apple tree. Weeks discusses the trees' natural beauty, their relationship with songbirds and how they must be treasured and maintained.

John Weeks broadcasts from the middle of a thunderstorm. Weeks explains the science behind thunder, lighting and storm clouds while describing how people throughout history have made sense of them.

John Weeks discusses the the plants and creatures in the wild that don't enjoy the random April snows of Oswego spring weather. Weeks also talks about what's best for the wild world and what humans need to understand about it.

John Weeks talks about some of the National Wildlife refugees along the East Coast in Virginia, Maryland and Delaware. Weeks shares his experiences of the sprouting spring life he discovered on his voyage and the different types of birds he viewed in places such as Bombay Hook in Delaware.

 

Originally aired on April 18th, 1987

25 Years of Somethings Special

Apr 3, 2012

John Weeks discusses the past of Nature of Things and how they gained their listeners and on air cast. He also talks about the creation of their Nature calendar when it happened. Weeks advises listeners to take a look at the beautiful nature of Central New York.

Taking A Country Trip In The Spring

Apr 3, 2012

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