newspapers

More About Recycling

Feb 13, 2014

This archived broadcast, More About Recycling, is from September 28, 1990. John Weeks talks about recycling in Onondaga County. He noticed that people who were paying weekly for the removal of their garbage were only filling it halfway or not at all. He did notice some overfilling bins on his way home one day though and it made him wonder some questions about recycling. He talks about a meeting that he attended about waste in his area and he found out that newspapers are recyclable and there was 1500 tons in just July.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

A new era of newspaper journalism has taken hold of central New York this week. The Syracuse Post-Standard's new business model is in place, with fewer printed copies of the paper, and more emphasis on digital platforms. And there are many implications of this change to the region.

The newspaper business is changing. It has to, in a digital world where information is as close as an app on a phone, or a tap on a computer. The question is, how will newspapers make that change? The Syracuse Post-Standard, owned by Advance Newspapers, has made its move, and the change is about to occur.

Progressive AE/Syracuse Media Group

In less than two weeks, the Post-Standard as central New York knows it takes a turn toward the future as it cuts back on print editions of the newspaper in favor of a digital website. The new Syracuse Media Group, which includes the reporting and sales sides of the digitally-focused  business, will soon be working out of a renovated bank on South Warren Street.

NS Newsflash / Flickr

The digital world has finally caught up with Syracuse's daily newspaper.  The Post-Standard has announced it is cutting back the number of print editions it puts out every week.

After more than one hundred years in circulation, Syracuse's newspaper is cutting production to three days a week.

The New York Times is still the nation's flagship newspaper - "the paper of record." But it has struggled recently, financially and otherwise.

On this week's edition of the Campbell Conversations, Daniel Schwarz, an English literature professor at Cornell and the author of "Endtimes," a new book about the newspaper's last 10 years, dissects its troubles and explains why he thinks the Times is the worst paper in America, except for all the others.

Watertown Daily Times closes its Washington bureau

Apr 10, 2012

 

An era in North Country – and national – journalism came to a quiet close at the end of March. The Watertown Daily Times closed its Washington, D.C. bureau, laying off the last of its capitol beat reporters, part of a tradition that stretches back more than 60 years.

 

The closure is part of a steep decline in regional newspapers providing their own eyes and ears on the ground in Washington, looking out for their readers' and their regions' interests as federal policy is made.

 

Joanna Richards has more.