nutrition

Why sustainability should be incorporated into our diets

Jun 18, 2016
Aleksandra B. / Flickr

When we think about healthy eating, many of us view it in regards to our personal health. However, we may need to view it in terms of a healthy environment as well.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Walter Willett tells us the dangers industrially producing food can have on the environment, and why a sustainable diet should become a necessity. Willett is the chair of the nutrition department at Harvard University School of Public Health, and the Fredrick John Stare professor of epidemiology and nutrition. He is also the chair of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Council of the annual Menus of Change leadership summit, which analyzes issues involving public health, the environment, and the food industry.

fishhawk / Flickr

When you think of healthy eating, you probably think of food that's nutritious for you. But what if we thought more about eating in a way that's healthy for the environment? The idea of sustainable eating is a philosophy that more people are adopting. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Walter Willett, chair of the Nutrition Department at the Harvard School of Public Health, about which foods have the most impact on the environment. Willett is one of the world's experts on sustainable eating.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Over the last month, a pilot program at the Delaware Primary and Elementary schools in Syracuse fed 200 students free dinners. Its part of a holistic approach to meet the educational and social needs of students.

Is it healthy or does it just sound healthy?

Jun 3, 2016

If you're trying to make nutritional choices with what you eat, some things are obviously good for you. But other foods may sound healthy, but really are not. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with nutritionist Kerri-Ann Jennings, former editor of Eating Well magazine, about her list of foods healthy-sounding foods you may want to think twice about before eating.

Pseph / Flickr

It’s a difficult fact to swallow -- Americans are heavier than ever. For a number of decades, we’ve been told that dietary fat was unhealthy and eating fat would make us gain weight. Fat equals fat, right? Our guest this week explains that the equation is not that simple. The tide is turning on fat.

Dr. Mark Hyman is a physician, a nine-time New York Times bestselling author, and director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. His latest book is “Eat Fat, Get Thin,” and that’s what he believes -- we can add fats back into our diet (keeping in mind that not all fats are created equal) and stay healthy. Hyman is the founder and medical director of The UltraWellness Center, a medical editor at The Huffington Post, and has been a regular medical contributor to CBS This Morning and The Today Show.

This week: Heroin addiction, organic foods and more

Apr 1, 2016

Finding a treatment program and overcoming an addition to heroin or another opioid is difficult but not impossible, says Dr. Ross Sullivan. Sullivan is director of medical toxicology at Upstate Medical University.

Sullivan tells how the effort to control pain medically helped create the current addiction crisis. Recent restrictions on prescription drugs have led to a flood of cheap heroin to fill the gap, he says, and current treatment options are inadequate to fight the high addiction rates.

Adult immunization recommendations are based less on the age of a person and more on their individual medical conditions, explains Dr. John Epling, professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine at Upstate Medical University. He recently was appointed to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an influential panel of national experts. He is also part of a group that makes recommendations about immunizations at the national level. He talks about the vaccinations all adults should receive, and when. 

What to eat -- or not eat -- before bedtime

Mar 11, 2016
Niklas Rhöse / via Flickr

On WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care" many guests have discussed what food people should eat -- or not eat -- to stay healthy. Getting a good night's sleep is part of staying healthy. This week, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with dietician and health writer Kerri-Ann Jennings about which foods to avoid before bedtime.

More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show, Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 p.m.  Support for this story comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

The health benefits of coconut oil and when to use it

Feb 20, 2016
Phu Thinh Co / Flickr

Cooking trends come and go as new information is constantly developing on the healthiest types of foods to cook with. But the most current one was not expected, having once been called “the devil himself in liquid form” by The New York Times.

This week on “Take Care,” Megan Ware, registered dietician, nutritionist and writer for Medical News Today and Livestrong.com, explains the health benefits of the new cooking trend: coconut oil.

This week: nutrition, obesity and cholesterol

Feb 4, 2016

Ensuring proper nutrition for senior citizens involves looking at changes in both body and lifestyle, say two registered dietitian nutritionists at Upstate University Hopsital.

Decreases in muscle mass, bone density and sense of smell, coupled with physical illness or depression, contribute to diminished appetite and calories needed, say Carrie Carlton and Cecilia Sansone. Among their prescriptions are a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods tailored to the individual, sufficient fluids and several small meals as an alternative to three main meals.

Eating paleo: the science behind the diet and lifestyle

Jan 16, 2016
sweetbeatandgreenbean / Flickr

It’s been called the caveman diet, but does it really replicate what people ate in the Paleolithic era? The Paleo diet has gained popularity in recent years for its focus on fresh, high-quality, unprocessed foods and its avoidance of grains, starches and added sugar.

This week,  Sarah Ballantyne -- a scientist turned Paleo advocate -- will introduce us to the science behind eating Paleo. Ballantyne is the founder of ThePaleoMom.com and author of many New York Times bestselling books on the same topic.

zsooIt / flickr

The paleo diet is one of the more popular current diets -- based on a theory that modern day man would be healthier if he or she ate more like a caveman. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Sarah Ballantyne, scientist turned paleo activist and author. Balantyne discusses the theories behind the diet and some of the new research into possible benefits.

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Beth Nelsen, a pediatrician at Upstate Medical University.

Ages vary for the screenings -- from 9 to 11 for cholesterol and from 16 to 19 for HIV -- which are updated annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen says.

Crystal Fieldhouse / Flickr

There are few things as intimate as food, according to this week’s guest. Food affects the quality of our day; we celebrate with food; we’re passionate about food -- for health and pleasure. And this fascination presents an opportunity for exploitation, says Dr. David Katz, who has been following the diet debate for years.

It’s never too late to maintain an active brain, says Patrick VanBeveren, the physical therapy supervisor at the The Centers at St. Camillus rehabilitation and skilled nursing facility.

VanBeveren stresses that physical activity, good nutrition and stress reduction are the “big three” for lifelong brain health. He describes simple ways to start -- taking short walks, eliminating any unhealthy food from your diet and setting aside a few minutes to relax on a regular basis.

Choosing among natural sugars and artificial sweeteners can be daunting.

Fortunately, much of the information you need about sweeteners is on the food’s label, allowing you to see the calories, carbohydrates and other nutritional information, says Maureen Franklin, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Upstate Medical University.

Franklin also explains differences among the various sweeteners and how they can affect individuals differently, as well as the key factors in all dietary decisions.

Talking turkey about labels this Thanksgiving

Nov 22, 2015
wiphy / Flickr

With the holidays approaching, turkey is at the top of many shopping lists. A trip to the grocery store can be overwhelming with so many different options including organic, free-range and hormone-free meats. This week on “Take Care,” we discuss what these terms mean with Susan Moores.

Susan Moores is a registered dietitian and former national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Moores has also written for the Wall Street Journal and MSNBC and covers healthy eating at her website SusanMoores.com.

This week: bipolar disorder, a nutrition update and more

Oct 30, 2015

A regular sleep schedule, medications and psychiatric treatment can help control bipolar disorder -- a condition marked by dramatic mood swings that dramatically impact one’s life.

Hot dogs and hamburgers: the truth about the meat we buy

Jul 19, 2015
Chris H / Flickr

According to the National Sausage and Hot Dog Council, during peak hotdog season, Americans typically consume 7 billion hot dogs. But what exactly is in these hotdogs that people buy at the supermarket, and is it healthy for people to be eating so many of them?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Kerri-Ann Jennings about what exactly is in the meat of the hot dogs and hamburgers that we eat. Jennings is a registered dietician and nutritionist, as well as former editor for Eating Well Magazine.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Now that school’s out, the Syracuse City School District will start offering breakfast and lunch to inner city children through its Summer Food Service Program.  But the program doesn’t reach all the children who may be going hungry without that daily breakfast, lunch and snack they get during the school year.

Green thumb, healthy plate

May 24, 2015
Vicki Moore / Flickr

Vegetables that people grow themselves have benefits not available through any other source. If you want salad for dinner, you can walk into your own garden and pick it yourself. You know nobody else has handled it, it hasn't traveled miles to your table and you're getting all of nature's nutrients at their peak.

So how hard is it to grow a vegetable garden? This week on “Take Care,” Marie Iannotti recommends five healthy vegetables that are also easy to grow for the modest gardener. Iannotti is a longtime master gardener, a former Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulture educator, master gardener program coordinator, and a member of the Garden Writer's Association and The Garden Conservancy. She's the author of two gardening books and is the gardening expert at About.com.

The myths of detox diets

Apr 19, 2015
Marilyn M / Flickr

Can mixing cayenne pepper, lemon juice, syrup and water help flush out toxins from your body? Can detoxing help weight loss?

This week on “Take Care,” Susan Moores discusses the negative effects detox diets have on the body. Moores is a registered dietician and former national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Multiple solutions needed to end obesity epidemic

Apr 8, 2015
greggavedon.com / via Flickr

 

Close to 60 percent of New Yorkers are overweight or obese. This week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced he would take steps to fight the obesity epidemic in the state.

New York state ranks second nationwide for medical expenditures related to obesity issues. One researcher says solutions to the problem should include both public health efforts and individualized treatment.

The top foods for boosting your immune system

Mar 27, 2015

This cold and flu season you may have heard experts recommend ways to avoid catching diseases, like washing your hands often. But is there anything you can do to build up your body's immune system? This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with author, chef and registered dietician Michelle Dudash about ways to adjust your diet to improve your natural defense system.

Lorraine Rapp: What are some of the foods that you recommend we incorporate into our diets that have been shown to boost our immune system?

This week: miscarriage, HIV prevention and healthy weight

Mar 5, 2015

Though miscarriages can often go unnoticed, they are tremendous losses to the mothers who experience them. Certified nurse midwife Kathleen Dermady explains the symptoms of miscarriage, and Dr. Shawky Badawy goes over the causes.

"Sometimes they have the feeling of blaming themselves," Badawy says of the mothers, "but they are not to blame."

Also this week: how to obtain the prescription drug that can prevent the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS -- plus, nutrition and healthy weight.

How adjustments in diet can reduce inflammation

Feb 22, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

Inflammation can be a reaction to an injury or infection where the body reddens and swells. It’s sometimes painful and can also be a sign that the body is ready to begin the healing process. But, chronic inflammation is a cause for concern and even has ties to heart disease.

This week on “Take Care,” health expert Johannah Sakimura discusses foods that are high in anti-inflammatory compounds. Sakimura writes the Nutrition Sleuth column at Everyday Health. She has a master’s degree in nutrition from the Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO file photo

A program to encourage healthy living in one of Syracuse’s most low income neighborhoods is getting a big funding push.

The New York State Health Foundation is giving the Lerner Center at Syracuse University a quarter million dollars to expand its healthy eating and exercise program on the city’s Near West Side. The Lerner Center is working with Nojaims Supermarket and the fairly new St. Joseph’s hospital health clinic that’s right next door.

On this week's show Maria Erdman explains how a registered dietitian nutritionist who specializes in oncology can help cancer patients as they go through treatment. Appetite, eating habits and weight are all potentially affected by cancer treatment.

"Some people sail right through, but for many people it's very challenging," Erdman says.

Also this week: searching for ways to replace cells that are lost during retinal degeneration and the history of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

U.S. Department of Agriculture

School lunches have changed dramatically in recent years in because of the federal government’s Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act, meant to curb childhood obesity. Portion sizes, calories and salt have been cut; whole grains, fruits and vegetables have been added. And now one central New York School district is bracing for the next changes.

Challenging America's food culture

Nov 23, 2014
Jon Mould / Flickr

When you were a child, you may have been told by your parents to finish everything on your plate.  You may also have been forced to eat vegetables as punishment or you were given candy as a reward for good behavior.  While such approaches to eating can be helpful in some circumstances, they are usually unhealthy and can contribute to obesity. 

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Cynthia Morrow talks about the unhealthy eating habits that are ingrained in American culture.  Morrow is a public health physician and teaches public health and preventive medicine at Upstate Medical University.

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