nutrition

On this week's show Maria Erdman explains how a registered dietitian nutritionist who specializes in oncology can help cancer patients as they go through treatment. Appetite, eating habits and weight are all potentially affected by cancer treatment.

"Some people sail right through, but for many people it's very challenging," Erdman says.

Also this week: searching for ways to replace cells that are lost during retinal degeneration and the history of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

U.S. Department of Agriculture

School lunches have changed dramatically in recent years in because of the federal government’s Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act, meant to curb childhood obesity. Portion sizes, calories and salt have been cut; whole grains, fruits and vegetables have been added. And now one central New York School district is bracing for the next changes.

Challenging America's food culture

Nov 23, 2014
Jon Mould / Flickr

When you were a child, you may have been told by your parents to finish everything on your plate.  You may also have been forced to eat vegetables as punishment or you were given candy as a reward for good behavior.  While such approaches to eating can be helpful in some circumstances, they are usually unhealthy and can contribute to obesity. 

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Cynthia Morrow talks about the unhealthy eating habits that are ingrained in American culture.  Morrow is a public health physician and teaches public health and preventive medicine at Upstate Medical University.

The many shapes and sizes of mushrooms

Oct 12, 2014
Seth Anderson / via Flickr

Although mushrooms are a popular ingredient in many dishes, their nutritional benefits are often overlooked. 

This week on “Take Care,” nutritionist Joan Rogus describes some of the more popular kinds of mushrooms and how to get the most nutrition out of them. Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Green tea time brings health benefits

Sep 26, 2014

Today's consumers seem to be always looking for foods that have lots of health benefits. Green tea is one of those foods that have been recently credited for everything from helping you lose weight to preventing cancer. This week on WRVO's weekly health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with one of the country's top dieticians, Ashley Koff, about why drinking green tea is a healthy choice.

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about green tea that makes it so healthy?

Figuring out fiber

Aug 3, 2014
lisaclarke / Flickr

Fiber is a word that is often thrown around in conversations regarding digestive health.  Fiber comes in many forms, and it can be difficult knowing which types are the best for you.

This week on “Take Care,” nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about the importance of fiber in your diet and how to get the appropriate amount.  Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

reed_sandridge / Flickr

Everyone from doctors to educators to first lady Michelle Obama seems to be concerned about the nutrition and physical activity children in this country are getting. A recent WRVO community health forum asked a panel of regional experts about what is being done and what should be done to improve the diet and fitness of the children in central and northern New York.

A startling statistic captures why there is such concern across the country about childhood obesity rates.

Lorraine Rapp / WRVO

This forum will air on Sunday, June 15 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. Listen locally on your radio, on your smart phone or tablet device, or online.

Keeping children healthy sounds like it's something that should be everyone's goal but how to keep America's youth healthy can be very controversial.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

ACR Health in Syracuse is hoping a successful nutrition program can be expanded to serve others in the community, but right now its nutritional education program currently only has funding to serve clients with HIV/AIDS.

Brian Cowden, 50, has been living with HIV since he was 19. On medication to control the disease, Cowden says he never felt good, complaining of gastrointestinal problems, migraines, sleep issues. But after joining ACR Health’s nutritional program, that all went away.

Going green with juicing

Mar 23, 2014
Creative Commons via Flickr

While the taste of vegetables may turn some people off, they contain nutrients that are vital for a healthy body. Turning to popular and creative methods such as juicing or making smoothies is a quick, easy and tasty way to consume these important vegetables. This approach has become so popular in recent years that juice bars have started to open up in some cities across the country.

This week on Take Care, Yuri Elkaim talks about green drinks. Elkaim is a registered holistic nutritionist, fitness expert and health coach, as well as a former professional soccer player. He currently writes a fitness blog at U.S. News and World Report.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Yuri Elkaim.

7 foods that can take your diet to a "super" level

Mar 16, 2014
gkdavie / flickr

The word “superfood” may sound a bit intimidating, but nutritionists believe they allow people to take their healthy diets to the next level. But what makes a food “super,” and what foods actually make the cut?

This week on Take Care, Rachel Berman talks about seven superfoods that can easily be incorporated into a healthy diet. Berman is a registered dietician and the health editor at About.com. She is also the author of Boosting Your Metabolism for Dummies and Mediterranean Diet for Dummies.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Rachel Berman.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The food budget for individuals receiving federal food stamps, now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), comes down to $29.40 a week, $4.20 a day. Members of the Religious Roundtable of Interfaith Works of Central New York are in the midst of a one-week SNAP challenge, only eating what that amount of money will buy.  

Temple Concord Rabbi Daniel Fellman says this kind of budget limits people to a carbohydrate-heavy, highly processed diet.

You can't go wrong with fall veggies

Oct 13, 2013
Leah Landry / WRVO

What do you think of when you hear the words "fall foods?" For children, “fall foods” may mean candy corn and Halloween treats, while others may think vegetables -- things like squash, cabbage and beets. These fall under the category of autumnal vegetables, and can provide many healthy benefits to consumers of them.

This week on Take Care, nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about what makes fall vegetables good for you. Rogus is a registered dietitian in central New York who's been a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for over 25 years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Keeping food safe in the summer sun & heat

Jun 16, 2013
Mark H. Anbinder / Flickr

Summer means dining al fresco, picnics and grilling out. But how does all this outdoor activity affect your food? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

100% Natural: What's in a name?

May 12, 2013
foodpolitics.com

When it comes to going to the supermarket, Dr. Marion Nestle wants you to keep one thing in mind:

“The purpose of the entire layout of the supermarket is to sell food products. There’s a sales pitch with every single product, every single layout.”

This week, “Take Care” interviews Nestle, a professor in nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University. She is the author of many books on the topic of food labeling, including Food Politics, which is currently celebrating its 10th anniversary of publication.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Marion Nestle.

The importance of food labels

May 10, 2013

As more Americans try to eat healthier, consumers are trying to find out more information about the food they purchase at the grocery store. And that means reading the labels. But terms like "organic" and "all natural" can be confusing. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness program "Take Care," recently spoke to NYU professor of sociology and nutrition, Dr. Marion Nestle about how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates food labels and how consumers have demanded changes in those rules.

Berry, berry good for you

Apr 28, 2013
Allie from Vancity / Flickr

They’re small, sweet and easy to eat.  Just pick, rinse, and pop one in your mouth. Not only do berries taste good, they’re good for you as well.  Regardless of shape or size, blueberries, strawberries, raspberries -- any berries -- experts say they provide significant health benefits, which is why some people call them the new super fruit.

Click the "Read More" button to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Advancements in AIDS treatment means that people with the illness are living longer than ever. That means they need to take better care of their long-term health. A new program for AIDS patients in the north country focuses on improving their nutrition.