Oneida Indian Nation

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

A bill vetoed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo this month would have given Madison County some of the cash the Oneida Indian nation pays to state as part of a compact that’s been in place between the state and the nation since 2013. Madison County didn’t have gaming at that time, but it does now, and officials say it’s only fair that the county should get in on some of the gambling revenue. 

State Sen. Dave Valesky (D-Oneida) says a veto usually means the end of a story.  But he’s sees a glimmer of hope in this case, in the governor’s veto message.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Officials in Madison County are urging Gov. Andrew Cuomo to sign a law that would allow the state to share gaming revenue from the Yellow Brick Road Casino with the county. State law allows a portion of revenue the state gets from Native American run casino’s to be shared with the host county. Since the Yellow Brick Road Casino opened in Chittenango after the law was passed, it didn’t get in on the revenue sharing deal according to Madison County Board of Supervisors John Becker.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Republican primary voters in the 22nd Congressional District elected Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney to represent them Tuesday. She defeated her two GOP opponents, Cazenovia businessman Steve Wells and Binghamton teacher George Phillips, capturing 41 percent of the vote.

Tenney finally won the party’s ticket after losing this very primary race in 2014 to then-incumbent Rep. Richard Hanna, who’s now retiring. He endorsed Wells, her more moderate opponent.

National Congress of American Indians /

A recent poll from the Washington Post found that 90 percent of 504 Native Americans whom were surveyed are not bothered by the use of the term redskin, but that is not stopping an effort to change the Washington NFL team's name.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

An official from Oneida County is threatening legal action over proposed state legislation that would give Madison County more casino revenue from the Oneida Indian Nation.

Benketaro / Flickr

Construction is underway on the Lago Resort and Casino in Seneca County. But, that isn't stopping other casinos in the region from rallying to  block it.

This week on the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher talks with the internationally acclaimed Oneida Nation singer and songwriter Joanne Shenandoah.  They discuss music, peacemaking, and politics, as well as her recent work to reduce violence among Native American children.  Their political conversation touches upon the tensions among the Nations of the Iroquois when it comes to policies like casino gambling. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

The Oneida Indian Nation, which operates the Turning Stone Casino in Verona, opened the new Yellow Brick Road Casino in Chittenango earlier this month. Madison County is pushing to receive a percentage of the new revenue New York state is getting from the Oneidas.

Madison County Board Chairman John Becker admits they didn't see this coming.

O World of Photos / via Flickr

Oneida County is using some its share in revenue from the Turning Stone casino to fund arts and science programs.

Oneida County is receiving a $2.5 million annual cut of the Turning Stone profits. That’s through a revenue sharing deal between the Oneida Indian Nation that runs the casino and New York state.

County Executive Anthony Picente has proposed using those funds for downtown development, infrastructure upgrades, public safety, and arts and science.

New Oneida Indian Nation casino raises questions

Dec 24, 2014
Oneida Indian Nation

Following the state's announcement that three upstate locations would become home to Las Vegas style casinos, the Oneida Indian Nation made its own announcement. They will soon build and open a casino in the Madison County Village of Chittenango. The news has brought up questions regarding last year's agreement between New York state, the Oneida Nation and Madison and Oneida Counties.