Onondaga Nation

Monica Sandreczki / WSKG

At an All Nations Powwow at the Portal Institute in Susquehanna, Pa., tribes of Native Americans from across the United States gathered to celebrate their traditions and support a struggling tribe. The pow wow is put on as a benefit for the Lakota people from South Dakota.

Tribes from all over the eastern United States and Midwest were gathered in the middle of the Pennsylvania woods.

A string of male and female dancers in vivid color step and bounce in time to the drum.

Thomas Favre-Bulle / via Flickr

At the Baldwinsville School District’s administrative office, Superintendent David Hamilton works from an office filled with reclaimed furniture. He says a fancy office chair doesn’t help teach students biology.

Hamilton says that sort of frugality is what helped Baldwinsville score one of the best “bang for the buck” ratings in a recent report by the Center for American Progress. It ranked high on a spending to test score ratio.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

This summer, environmental questions will be heard surrounding the construction of a new amphitheater on the old Solvay waste beds along Onondaga Lake. A draft environmental impact statement surrounding the project will soon be up for review.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO file photo

With its domestic options exhausted, the Onondaga Indian Nation has taken its land claim case to an international commission.

It’s been six months since the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the Onondaga’s claim to 2.6 million acres of land in central New York. In the lawsuit first filed in 2005, the nation says land was illegally taken from it in the 18th and 19th centuries.

While the country's top court has thrown out the challenge, the Onondaga Indian Nation says it will now take its land claim fight to international courts.

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected the Onondaga's petition this week to review the dismissal of its long-running lawsuit claiming a massive swath of land running down the middle of New York state.

The Nation had argued the 4,000 square miles in 11 counties was illegally taken by the state through a series of bogus treaties.

While the state-level negotiations on the casinos were taking place, another separate process was marking a much longer history of native and non-native relationships—The Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign.  On this week’s edition of the Campbell Conversations, Grant Reeher speaks with Onondaga Nation Faithkeeper Oren Lyons and the Renewal Campaign’s Project Coordinator Andy Mager, about the campaign’s aims, and the importance of recognizing and honoring the past in order to improve the future. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

As the Onondaga Nation prepares for a canoe trip this summer to promote awareness of the Two Row Wampum Treaty, three Onondaga Nation men have gone back to their ancestors for inspiration.