organic

The bug-eat-bug world of organic gardening

May 4, 2014
clara bonnet / flickr

Good night, don’t let the pest bugs bite… your plants, that is. Pests can be one problem affecting gardens, but it’s not the only thing to look out for, especially when it comes to organic gardening.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy talks about the basics of organic gardening. Jeanroy is a gardening expert, and covers herb gardening for the how-to website About.com. She’s the author of Canning and Preserving for Dummies, now in its second edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

Robyn Lee / via Flickr

Upstate New York grocery store chain Wegmans has come out and said federal food regulators should develop standards and labeling practices for foods that contain genetically modified ingredients.

stevendepolo / flickr

With vegetables readily available at any grocery store, one may forget that growing them at home is even an option. While growing plants from seed takes more time and effort than just buying them, one expert believes that not only is it worth it, but it’s actually easier to do than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy talks about the basics of growing plants from seed. Jeanroy, an expert herb gardener and contributor to About.com, has written many books on the subject, including Canning and Preserving for Dummies, 2nd edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

publicenergy / Flickr

For farmers in upstate New York, going organic isn’t easy. But one farmer who’s made the switch is happy that the new Farm Bill will make it easier to transition from traditional to organic farming in the future.

Ben Simons has been a dairy farmer in Remsen for two decades. Two years ago, he decided to convert his operation over to an organic dairy.

"Because I did not want to expand my dairy anymore," Simons says. "It was very difficult to stay a small family farm and compete with conventional milk.”