parking

Alyson Hurt / Flickr

After several years of debate, the Oswego Common Council said it has finally taken a step toward resolving persistent complaints about the city's winter parking policy.

The council unanimously passed a new law Tuesday that will ban parking on city streets from midnight to 6 a.m. starting in December and ending in March. Residents without a driveway or adequate parking spaces can apply for one $75 annual permit per address to leave their vehicle on the street.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO News File Photo

At its meeting Monday night, the Oswego Common Council revealed a much-awaited plan to address the city's controversial winter parking policy. The proposal would keep the overnight parking ban in place, extending it from 1 a.m.-6 a.m. to 12 a.m.-6 a.m., while allowing residents with inadequate parking space to apply for on-street parking permits. 

Councilor Nate Emmons said residents who are approved for the exemption would pay $125 for the annual permit, which would follow an odd-even side system. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News

While many cities in upstate New York have established a permanent winter parking policy, Oswego continually revisits the issue. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Oswego officials are wrestling with how to handle street parking during winter months. An unsuccessful alternate side parking plan from 2015 prevented snowplows from effectively clearing city roads, leading Oswego's new mayor to implement an overnight parking ban this year. But, the city's residents are not satisfied with the move.  

Gino Geruntino / WRVO News File Photo

In his first executive action, Oswego Mayor William Barlow restored the winter parking ban on city streets and highways from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. It's a reversal from the contentious policy last year of alternate side parking, which former Mayor Thomas Gillen implemented.

The ban is effective immediately, pending approval from the Oswego Common Council's traffic committee, which Barlow said is "very, very likely."

Joe Marino

The city of Utica is showing its appreciation to the nation's veterans, not only on Veterans Day, but every day of the year. The city recently unveiled specially designated parking spaces near the disabled parking spots for veterans and their widowed spouses.
 

Fourth Ward Councilman Joe Marino says he came up with the idea while he was talking with his brother-in-law, who had returned from serving overseas a couple years ago. Since then, Marino says the city has rallied behind the plan.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO

A new smartphone app being used by the city of Syracuse will allow drivers to pay for parking without going to the meter. The app, called Whoosh, was developed by Parkeon, the same company that provides Syracuse with its electronic parking meters.

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner said the app is being tested on 90 of the 280 meters in the city, mainly in Armory Square. 
 

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Paying for street parking from your smart phone will soon be an option in the city of Syracuse. Public Works Commissioner Pete O'Connor says the option to pay by phone will be available once meter readers get new hand-held devices they use to scan cars parked on city streets.  

“On the app, there will be a map. You’ll punch in what block you’re in. The meter will pop up for that block, you punch in what time you want, what credit card you want, and your license plate number. That’s it.”

quinn.anya / via Flickr

Syracuse will begin going after the roughly 19,000 drivers with multiple unpaid parking tickets in a few months thanks to a new deal to ramp up "booting."

The Syracuse Common Council has temporarily pulled the "Ban the Box" legislation in order to conduct more public outreach and rework the legislation.