Plan 2014

Thousand Islands Tourism Bureau

Green groups and boaters along the St. Lawrence River and eastern Lake Ontario won a huge victory Thursday. The U.S. and Canada approved a new, more natural plan for managing water levels after 16 years of study that cost more than $20 million. It's the first time a new method for managing outflows at the Moses-Saunders hydroelectric dam has been enacted since the dam was built in the 1950s. The new regime, known as "Plan 2014," more closely mimics the natural ebbs and flows of the water, and...

ceedub13 / Flickr, Creative Commons

A non-profit says The St. Lawrence River is one of the 10 most endangered rivers in the country. American Rivers say the fish and wildlife of the St. Lawrence will remain in jeopardy until the U.S. and Canada approves a plan for controlling its water levels.

Coalition promoting water level plan for Lake Ontario

Dec 10, 2014
Gino Geruntino / WRVO

A coalition of land owners, elected officials, environmental groups and others are launching a campaign calling on the governments of the U.S. and Canada to move ahead with the latest plan, called Plan 2014, to regular water levels on Lake Ontario. Proponents say Plan 2014 would restore Lake Ontario to more natural levels by controlling dams along the St. Lawrence River. Some owners of shoreline property are unhappy with the new plan because they are worried it would cause more damage to...

Leah Landry / WRVO News File Photo

Boosters of a controversial plan to ease the regulation of Lake Ontario water levels are continuing their push to get the federal government to agree to the proposal. The outdoor sports community is lining up behind Plan 2014.

Plan 2014 eliminates a 50-year-old policy of regulating water levels of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. Proponents want lake levels to go up and down naturally, which they say would bring back some of the wildlife damaged by the practice.
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Julia Botero / WRVO

Local politicians, environmentalists and business owners gathered in Clayton Wednesday to urge Washington, D.C. to adopt a new plan to manage water levels on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. The current plan is 55 years old. This new one promises to restore wetlands and wildlife to the waterways while also extending the boating season. But the issue has been debated for over a decade. To understand what this new plan hopes to fix, imagine this: If the St. Lawrence River and Lake...

Ray Sawhillv / Flickr

The organization responsible for regulating water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River is holding a series of public hearings in upstate New York and Canada this week, presenting a new management plan. The International Joint Commission, or IJC, attracted criticism for its last draft of the plan, called Bv7 , which aimed to alter water levels to decrease environmental damage around the Great Lake.

The newest version, called Plan 2014, aims to strike a compromise between...