religion

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Members of the Syracuse faith community and the city’s police department want to be “proactive” in improving the relationship between the community and police department.

African-African faith leaders will hold a series of monthly community meetings at different churches in the city beginning next month with the goal of facilitating a dialog between the police department and community members.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

A museum and shrine honoring St. Marianne Cope is ready for visitors. The center will honor a woman raised in central New York and who became a saint two years ago.

The museum sits on North Townsend Street, in the shadow of St. Joseph’s Hospital on Syracuse’s northside.  Cope was one of the founders of St. Joe’s and current CEO Kathryn Ruscitto says there will always been a connection.

“The reason we are such a unique institution is because of the roots that started with St. Marianne,” Ruscitto said. “So we are just delighted to have it on our campus.”

It’s about freedom of speech.

That’s what Greece Town Supervisor Bill Reilich told reporters Monday after the Supreme Court decided the town council was not violating the constitution by opening town meetings with prayer.

The town kept the tradition of offering prayers before each meeting, even after two residents brought the case to court in 2008.

David Chanatry/NYRP-UC

Americans are generally thought of as a religious people. But in some areas, church closings are becoming a not uncommon event, as fewer young people join to replace the older generation. That's what happened recently with one Mohawk Valley congregation.

From the time more than a century ago when two dozen German immigrants turned an old armory in Little Falls into a place of worship, prayer and music have provided comfort and inspiration and peace to the congregation of Christ Lutheran Church.

Terry Monahan knows the feeling.

As Election Day approaches, is there such a thing as a catholic vote?  Catholics make up a quarter of the voting electorate, but they don't vote in lockstep.  Roman Catholic teachings can take a Catholic voter to both ends of the political spectrum.

This year’s presidential election has brought up a host of perplexing questions about the relationship between religion and politics, and the importance of a candidate’s faith. In this week’s edition of the Campbell Conversations, Grant Reeher probes those questions with Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the eldest child of Robert and Ethel Kennedy.

Central New York will have its own saint when Mother Marianne Cope is canonized in the Vatican on Sunday, October 21.

John Vachon, 1914-1975, Flickr Commons

The Campbell Institute of Public Affairs at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University presents the second in a series of debates on timely issues of public importance, with a fresh, provocative format.

Marcus Matthews is the Resident Bishop for the Upper New York Area of the United Methodist Church. In this conversation he discusses the relationship between religion and politics, and how that relationship plays out in the Bishop's desire to see his churches have a greater presence and impact in their communities.