revitalization

Governor Andrew Cuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to invest $1.5 billion to help the struggling upstate economy, but there’s a catch -- regions will have to compete for the money.

Cuomo says his budget plan will include an upstate revitalization fund, but it won’t be distributed to all of the state’s economically depressed regions. Instead, the seven regions will be competing for a share of the funds. The rules are: only three will receive grants of $500 million each.

“Why the competition?” Cuomo asked rhetorically. “Because I believe in competition.”

Roy Saplin

A nonprofit behind a development on the site of the old Lyons Falls Paper Mill in Lewis County will receive a $1 million grant from the state.

The Lewis County Development Corporation is in the first phase of demolishing the abandoned paper mill. They've slowly removed hazardous materials and obtained building permits. The non-profit plans to build a modern industrial park on the 9-acre site.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO

Residents living in the city of Oswego have been making small changes to the exteriors of their houses in an effort to beautify neighborhoods. The goal of the program isn't just to restore property values, but to restore pride as well.

Catharine Early has lived in her home on the corner of West Third St. for about eight years. But it wasn't until this summer that she took action to repair an old retaining wall near the side of her house.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The Starwood group is now building two hotels in Syracuse’s Inner Harbor. Word of the second hotel came at the groundbreaking of the first.

With developers and dignitaries on hand for the groundbreaking of an Aloft Hotel in Syracuse’s Inner Harbor, Jeremy Cooper of Starwood Hotels made an announcement.

"In addition to this groundbreaking, another Starwood Hotel is being built right here in the Inner Harbor. The Element Syracuse Inner Harbor Hotel is expected to open in 2018," said Cooper.

NathanaelB / Via Flickr

Upstate New York’s cities need to make investments in quality of life if they want to recreate their past economic vitality, according to a local expert on cities.

Mildred Warner of Cornell University recently held a conference at the college on the economic state of upstate New York’s largest urban centers.

She says the region’s cities aren’t getting the "full gamut" of rediscovery by younger generations because they’re not investing enough in areas like quality of life and infrastructure.

The city of Oswego is trying to regain what years of population decline and lost manufacturing jobs have taken away. According to Mayor Thomas Gillen, part of that reclamation means revitalizing the city's neighborhoods.

Gillen said the Oswego Renaissance Association is speaking with local banks to secure funding for small loans, grants or matching funds to assist homeowners in making needed repairs.

The money would also be tied to neighborhood development, encouraging neighborhoods to take on projects together.