school lunch

U.S. Department of Agriculture

School lunches have changed dramatically in recent years in because of the federal government’s Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act, meant to curb childhood obesity. Portion sizes, calories and salt have been cut; whole grains, fruits and vegetables have been added. And now one central New York School district is bracing for the next changes.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Recent changes to the National School Lunch Program have been controversial, with some student, parents and educators complaining about them. A few school districts nationwide have even decided to drop out of the program.

This week on “Take Care,” Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition and Policy Consultants in Washington, D.C., discusses the history of the school lunch program, the new guidelines, and the reason behind why some school districts are dropping out.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Tracy Fox.

Recent changes to make the federally subsidized National School Lunch Program more nutritious have been controversial. In fact, several central New York schools have opted out. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition and Policy Consultants in Washington, D.C. about how the program works.

Lorraine Rapp: Bring us up to date, if you would, on what changes were made and what was the reason behind it?

reed_sandridge / Flickr

When high school students in the Fayettevlle-Manlius and Baldwinsville school districts go back to class this week, they’ll find food more to their liking in the lunch room.

Both districts have opted out of the National School Lunch Program that limits calories, carbohydrates and sodium in school lunches.

Baldwinsville Superintendent David Hamilton says too many students in his district stopped buying lunches, and that threatened the viability of the school lunch program.

reed_sandridge / Flickr

Everyone from doctors to educators to first lady Michelle Obama seems to be concerned about the nutrition and physical activity children in this country are getting. A recent WRVO community health forum asked a panel of regional experts about what is being done and what should be done to improve the diet and fitness of the children in central and northern New York.

A startling statistic captures why there is such concern across the country about childhood obesity rates.