senior citizens

The group F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse is trying to keep baby boomers from leaving the area as they retire. The community group has completed a study about just how age-friendly central New York is.

Baby boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, make up about a third of Onondaga County’s population. F.O.C.U.S. wanted to find out what would make it easier for them to stay in central New York.  

The importance of planning for your senior years

Nov 28, 2014
amrita b / Flickr

Many people don't think through what their needs will be in their senior years, as their physical capabilities or health decline. But, experts in the field of elder care believe that is a mistake. WRVO Public Media community recently held a community forum in Ithaca on the topic, which will be broadcast Sunday at 7 p.m. The three expert panelists agreed that much more planning should be done by all involved in the lives of the elderly.

Before moving, seniors should ask these questions

Apr 27, 2014
The Pointe at Kilpatrick / Flickr

After raising kids in the family home and living there for decades, it may be hard for aging adults to consider a life anywhere else. When debilitating illness or a terminal condition requires advanced care, options are limited. But for the senior who moves by choice, that next step can provide a wider variety of living options.  When should we be making that decision, and what should we look for when we plan for that next phase of our lives?

This week on Take Care, Barbara Dopyera Daley, a social gerontologist and elder life advocate in Syracuse,  explains a variety of housing options for seniors. Daley holds a master's degree in gerontology and public policy and consults with organizations, individuals and their families on issues related to care and aging.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barbara Dopyera Daley.

Since it opened in July, the geriatric emergency room, known as GEM Care, at the Upstate University Hospital Community Campus is getting more seniors in the emergency department compared to a year ago.

GEM Care Director Dr. Jaime Ciacco said the new emergency department has achieved the goal of having fewer seniors admitted to the hospital after those visits.

He also said one thing they are finding at the facility, is that they're fixing the small things that can often be overlooked in a senior's health care.

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The vast majority of the state’s county-run nursing homes are losing money and facing a shaky financial future, according to the findings of a new study by the Center for Governmental Research.

As a result, most counties are looking for alternatives to deal with an aging population.

In recent years, six New York counties have sold or closed their nursing homes. As costs continue to rise, many others are considering privatization as a solution.

Lessons for living

Jun 23, 2013
Enidanc / Flickr

In the age of the Internet, when was the last time you sought out an elder for advice? In a recent survey in the United Kingdom, nine out of 10 elders said they were being overlooked for advice from their grandchildren.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Karl Pillemer, a professor of human development at the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University and a professor of gerontology at the Weill Cornell Medical College. In 2004, he founded The Legacy Project for which he collected practical advice for living from over 1,000 senior citizens across the nation. The project led to his book “30 Lessons for Living: Tried and True Advice from the Wisest Americans.”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Karl Pillemer.

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An estimated 15 percent of people around the world live with some form of disability. Upstate universities are tackling the challenges faced by this segment of the population and coming up with innovative technologies to increase access.

A walker for elderly people that also monitors vital signs, and a cane that uses vibrations to allow deaf and blind people to easily navigate their environment: these are just a couple of the access technologies created by researchers in western New York.

More and more people across the country are dying from Alzheimer's disease -- and central New York is not immune to the trend.

New technologies can help seniors "age in place"

Jan 1, 2013
AgeLab / agelab.mit.edu

As the number of seniors citizens in America grows each year, the issue of how to make life easier for older people is growing in importance as well. One researcher, Joe Coughlin, has made it his passion to use technology to help people live longer and live better. WRVO's Catherine Loper spoke with Coughlin, who has roots in upstate New York, when he was in Syracuse this fall.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

An ambulance company in Onondaga County has started a program it hopes will help one of biggest causes of injury among the elderly.  The focus is on making senior's homes safe from falls.