shingles

This week: shingles, meningitis, eye research

Dec 8, 2016

People who had chicken pox or the chicken pox vaccine as children can undergo a reactivation of that disease’s virus in adulthood and wind up with shingles.

Researching ways to prevent and treat shingles, which brings a rash and possibly debilitating nerve pain, is the work of Jennifer Moffat, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Upstate University Hosptial. She describes how shingles, most common in adults over 50, can affect people with weakened immune systems.

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Imagine getting a skin rash so painful that it compares to the intensity of pain associated with childbirth and kidney stones. The Center for Disease Control says that shingles can cause this kind of pain, and that one in three Americans will get it in their lifetime. Why exactly does shingles cause this kind of pain, and what is being done to prevent and treat it?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Pritish Tosh discusses the skin rash known as shingles. Dr. Tosh is assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic where he has collaborated with the Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development. He’s a leading expert on emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Tosh.

It's one of the most painful syndromes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say one in three Americans will get it eventually and those over 60 should be vaccinated. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Pritish Tosh, assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic,  about shingles and how to prevent it.

Lorraine Rapp: Let’s start at the beginning so we have a full understanding.  Exactly what is shingles?