Siena Poll

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

A Siena College poll this week shows that most New Yorkers don't know about the Moreland Commission, a panel of district attorneys and law enforcement officials investigating public corruption in Albany.

Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick, co-chair of the Moreland Commission, says it doesn't bother him that many New Yorkers are unaware of the group's probes into public corruption. But he expects that'll change December 1, when the Moreland Commission releases it's report.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

A new poll finds Gov. Andrew Cuomo well positioned to win re-election next year, but there are some weaknesses in his generally positive numbers.

ChrisYunker / via Flickr

A new poll finds language on a referendum on New York state's November ballot to portray the expansion of casino gambling in a positive light is working, and gaining support among potential voters.  

A new poll finds most New Yorkers are ashamed of the candidacies of Anthony Weiner and Eliot Spitzer for mayor and comptroller of New York City, respectively. The Siena College poll also finds that Gov. Andrew Cuomo, in contrast, is enjoying a minor rebound with voters.

Anti-corruption is the dominant topic at the New York state legislature for the second week in a row, following bribery charges against two state lawmakers, including a former Senate leader. A new poll finds 81 percent of voters expect more Senators and Assembly members will be arrested.

Anti-corruption is the dominant topic at the New York State Legislature for the second week in a row, following bribery charges against two state lawmakers, including a former Senate leader. A new poll finds 81 percent of voters expect more senators and Assembly members will be arrested.

A new Siena College poll finds a slight drop in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s popularity for the third month in a row. The poll finds the governor’s popularity has dropped to 64 percent -- still higher than most politicians in the country -- but an eight point slide from a 72 percent approval rating in  December.

A new poll finds that, in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, more than two thirds of New Yorkers say they now believe in climate change.

After months of campaigning in the too-close-to-call 24th Congressional District race, it's almost time for voters to make their decision. The final weekend of the election season was a busy one.

Poll shows Doheny-Owens race in statistical tie

Nov 1, 2012
Amanda Morrison / Watertown Daily Times

The two candidates running for the North Country's congressional seat are in a statistical tie, according to the latest poll from Siena College. Republican Matt Doheny trailed incumbent Democrat Bill Owens by 13 points in Siena's last poll seven weeks ago. Owens now leads by just one point in the poll released today, which showed the Democrat receiving 44 percent support, to Doheny's 43 percent.

A new poll finds that Democrat incumbent Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is poised for a record breaking win on election day, with a more than 40-point lead over Republican challenger Wendy Long.

The contest for the one U.S. Senate seat from New York that is up for grabs starts in full force after Labor Day. And, for the first time ever, two women are pitted against each other in a statewide race. A Republican political unknown faces the Democrat chosen to fill the shoes of Hillary Clinton when she became Secretary of State. The two candidates visited the New York State Fair last week, admitting their names may still be unknown to many New Yorkers.

The Business Council of New York released its annual report card of the state's legislators, and the group gave New York Senate Republicans high marks for approving a pro-business agenda.

A recent poll offers some hope to Senate Democrats who are trying retake the Senate after losing to Republicans two years ago, but the GOP says they are far from worried.
 

Most New Yorkers agree with the recent Supreme Court decision upholding President Obama’s health care reform, but most think the new law, when fully implemented, will cause health care costs to rise.

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