Skaneateles Lake

Nancy Mueller / NYS Federation of Lake Associations, Inc.

This year’s mild fall is keeping the Onondaga County Health Department busy, as algal blooms in Skaneateles Lake and mosquito-borne illnesses are still being monitored at a time they are usually a fading summer memory.

Nancy Mueller / NYS Federation of Lake Associations, Inc.

Updated at 8:00 p.m. Thursday

Onondaga County health officials continue to say that the city of Syracuse's drinking water, along with the drinking water of other municipalities that draw water from Skaneateles Lake, is safe to drink. 

Samples tested Thursday at the state’s Wadsworth Lab in Albany found 0.25 parts per billion inside the City of Syracuse Gatehouse located in the Village of Skaneateles, but prior to the completion of the chlorination.

This level is consistent with prior reported sampling at the Gatehouse and below the health advisory levels for both adults and sensitive populations. All other locations in the water system – including the City of Syracuse, the Town of DeWitt, the Town of Skaneateles, the Village of Elbridge, and the Village of Jordan – showed non-detectable levels of algal toxins in finished water. These levels remain below the EPA’s 10-day health advisory level of 0.3 parts per billion for sensitive populations and well below the EPA advisory level for adults of 1.6 parts per billion.

Residents in the Village of Skaneateles and the other municipalities which use this drinking water source can continue to drink the water.

Original Post

Elevated levels of toxic blue-green algae have been discovered in the water of Skaneateles Lake. The lake is the primary water supply of the city of Syracuse’s water system. While tests show the public water is still safe to drink, residents who live along the lake’s shoreline and drink water directly from the lake could be at risk.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The New York State Department of Transportation is hosting neighborhood meetings regarding the Interstate-81 reconstruction project through downtown Syracuse. Many residents in Skaneateles are concerned that the project could negatively affect their area.

Nicholas A. Tonelll

There’s a new invasive insect causing problems in Onondaga County. The hemlock woolly adelgid has started feeding on hemlock trees in the watershed that provides water for the city of Syracuse.

An alert arborist found the bug that’s been on the eastern seaboard since the 1950s, munching on hemlock needles in trees on the Onondaga County side of Skaneateles Lake.

John Weeks recalls his trip to Skaneateles Lake. He describes to us what the lake looks like and the troubles he endured during this venture. He tells us about the mountains he climbed and the magnificent red and white oaks he saw while trying to his way back until a motorist rescued them and returned them to the doorstep they started at.

This episode of Nature of Things was originally aired on November 8th, 1991.

Skaneateles undecided about hydraulic fracturing

Apr 20, 2012
ltmayers via Flickr

The Finger Lakes are buzzing these days with the debate on hydro-fracking and many communities want it banned.  Thursday night the town of Skaneateles held a public forum to give residents the chance to speak their minds about a proposed law to prohibit the controversial process for natural gas drilling.