smartphones

Smartphone-related hand injuries and how to reduce them

Nov 11, 2017
Hamaza Butt / Flickr

Repeated use of anything can cause wear and tear including your smartphone. Continued scrolling and tapping can wear down the tendons in your hand and wrist causing injury. Repetitive use injuries are common in older adults but health professionals are seeing injury in younger patients as the age smartphone use decreases. 

Dr. Daniel Polatsch, an orthopedic hand surgeon and co-director of the New York Hand and Wrist Center of Lenox Hill, joins us this week to discuss how extended use of smartphones can cause injury and how to reduce the risk of it.

Nicolas Nova / Flickr

Most of us have smartphones or tablets these days, and even if you don't have many apps, you still could spend several hours a day swiping, scrolling and tapping. That could leave you with cramped, stiff or aching fingers and hands. this week on WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Dr.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Syracuse Police Department is trying to use technology to get more people to tip them off about criminal activity. A new smartphone app for Apple and Android phones, called SPD Tips, is now available. It allows people to anonymously contact police directly with a tip. It goes along with the 411 tips link on the department's website, according to police Chief Frank Fowler.

Smartphone Banking

Aug 6, 2015

In this episode, Jackie and Tom talk about the integration of smartphones in our society and how they relate to banking.

Doctor house calls go high-tech

Jul 31, 2015
CNBP / Flickr

The idea of the old-fashioned doctor house call has gone high-tech. Now, there are smart phone apps to schedule a home doctor visit or video conference call with a medical practitioner. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak to health and technology reporter Jennifer Jolly about what's driving this trend. Jolly writes the Wired Well column for the New York Times Well blog.

Let there be no light before bed

Feb 27, 2015

If reading in bed is something you've always done, you may want to think twice about using your smartphone or tablet for your nighttime reading. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's weekly health and wellness show, hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Lois Krahn, a psychiatrist with the Sleep Disorders Clinic at Mayo Clinic Arizona, about how too much screen time could be disturbing your sleep.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Paying for street parking from your smart phone will soon be an option in the city of Syracuse. Public Works Commissioner Pete O'Connor says the option to pay by phone will be available once meter readers get new hand-held devices they use to scan cars parked on city streets.  

“On the app, there will be a map. You’ll punch in what block you’re in. The meter will pop up for that block, you punch in what time you want, what credit card you want, and your license plate number. That’s it.”

Tom Magnarelli/WRVO

Several local politicians, including Rep. Dan Maffei (D-Syracuse) and New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman appeared at city hall in downtown Syracuse to throw their support behind the federal Smartphone Theft Prevention Act.

The act would require smartphone makers to install a “kill switch” on their devices that would allow customers to delete data and deactivate their phone remotely.

Schneiderman says the major manufactures have the technology to do this but are choosing not to.

wader / flickr

Some people consider social media a waste of time. But what if social media could be used to motivate positive change in people? What if social media could inspire people to make healthier choices, and even lose weight?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Tricia Leahey discusses DietBet, a social networking website that challenges users to lose weight. Leahey is an assistant professor in research at Brown Medical School and the Miriam Hospital’s Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, and is also part of the DietBetter.com’s advisory team.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Leahey.

Corning Inc Gorilla Glass

Upstate glass manufacturer Corning Inc. has developed the first antimicrobial glass for our proliferating smart devices, lap tops, and TVs. The glass is more resistant to bacteria but, doubts are emerging about the benefits of antibacterial products.

Cornell University

Researchers in upstate New York have created an app that will allow users to test their cholesterol levels through a blood sample that’s analyzed directly through their smartphone.  

Elerts.com

Mobile technology is driving the modernization of disaster relief and public safety response.  And, according to a recent report from the Brookings Institution, the rapid expansion of mobile devices and mobile driven data has already begun to save lives and alleviate suffering in disaster-struck communities.