sports

Matt Richmond/WSKG

The NBA playoffs begin this weekend. And while big city teams like Oakland, Cleveland and Atlanta are the favorites, sixty years ago the league looked much different.

In 1955, the Syracuse Nationals took home the title, beating the Fort Wayne Pistons in seven games. One of the guards on that team was Binghamton resident Bill Kenville, known during his playing days as Billy the Kid, and Kenville followed a surprising path to the NBA.

Chris Boese / via Flickr

Ski slopes this winter had some of their best snow in years, but record cold temperatures kept many skiers sheltered indoors. Now a cold March is allowing ski resorts to get a late-season boost to business.

This will be the last weekend of operation for Labrador Mountain, located south of Syracuse. Peter Harris, who owns Labrador and Song Mountains, says there will be a few more weekends to ski and ride at Song, which has a slightly deeper snowpack.

He says business all year has been about average, balancing the great snow with cold temps.

cuse.com

A major instance of academic fraud with the Syracuse University basketball program was the work of "rogue individuals," according to now former S.U. athletic director Daryl Gross.

Gross, who stepped down last week following an NCAA investigation into Syracuse athletics, spoke with WRVO News Tuesday.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Syracuse University basketball coach Jim Boeheim will appeal sanctions handed down on him from the NCAA, calling the penalties "unduly harsh."

For the first time since the NCAA released a report on the Syracuse athletic department March 6 charging the basketball program had run off the rails, Boeheim addressed the accusations. He spoke to the media for an hour Thursday at the Carrier Dome, saying he wanted to put forth his opinion on how events of academic fraud and poor oversight outlined by the NCAA took place.

  

MGoBlog / via Flickr

The career of basketball coach Jim Boeheim at Syracuse University now has an end date, with his announced retirement coming in the aftermath of an NCAA investigation into his program.

The university says Boeheim’s retirement in three years will bring certainty to the program and allow for "a successful, longer-term transition in coaching leadership," Chancellor Kent Syverud wrote in an open letter.

MGoBlog / via Flickr

The impact of an NCAA investigation into Syracuse University's athletics department has come to bear: Daryl Gross is out as athletic director and men's basketball coach Jim Boeheim will retire in three years.

The university also announced Wednesday it will appeal the vacation of more than 100 wins as ordered by the NCAA.

MGoBlog / via Flickr

  Top Syracuse University officials that work with student athletes say the culture that allowed for its top sports programs to violate NCAA rules over the span of a decade is no more.

The university says it took a number of steps to ensure better compliance with NCAA rules before the college sports governing body handed down the results of its investigation. That includes hiring Tony Powell to be assistant provost for student athlete development. He works closely with Rick Burton, who was named academic athletics representative last year.

MGoBlog / via Flickr

Syracuse University could make a decision on whether to appeal harsh sanctions against its athletic department from the NCAA as early as next week.

Syracuse University Chancellor Kent Syverud and other university officials plan to sit down Monday to discuss the penalties and fines handed down from the college athletics governing body. In a letter to university faculty, interim Vice Chancellor Liz Liddy detailed the meeting and timeline.

Matthew Snyder / via Flickr

There is plenty of snow on the ground, but frigid temperatures are keeping people away from upstate New York’s ski mountains.

With schools out for winter break last week, President’s Day week is usually a key money-maker for ski slopes. But temperatures barely got into the double digits last week and despite good conditions, many skiers stayed inside.

Jim Hickey, who owns Toggenburg Ski Resort south of Syracuse, says it was “crazy” how cold it was last week.

Trysil / Flickr

The time to pull out the winter sporting gear has come, but with it comes the possibility of injury

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Navan Duggal discusses the strain winter sports can have on the body and what you can do to decrease the risk of injury. Duggal was chief of the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is currently in private practice at Syracuse Orthopedic Surgeons.

Why snow plus sports so often equals injuries

Dec 19, 2014

Winter sports are certainly popular in northern and central New York. But whether it’s skating, skiing or sledding, falling on the snow or ice is inevitable -- and can lead to injury. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Syracuse-based orthopedist Dr. Naven Duggal about the risks of winter sports and how to prevent injuries.

simonimages / via Flickr

Maybe it’s to allow for guilt-free indulgence around the dinner table this afternoon. Or perhaps it’s about family bonding, but more central New Yorkers are lacing up their running shoes on Thanksgiving morning and going for runs before the feast.

"We tell ourselves that it’s offsetting that gluttony. 'Oh, I can have those massed potatoes now, I did that Turkey Trot this morning,'" said Liz Knickerbocker, with the running store Fleet Feet

Keith Allison / Flickr

The Oneida Indian Nation and the Change the Mascot campaign have spent more than a year putting public pressure on the Washington D.C. football franchise to drop its nickname, the Redskins. They say it’s offensive.

Change the Mascot is continuing its push on Washington’s pro football team to change its name by reaching out to owners of all the NFL teams and taking action in Congress.

Half the U.S. Senate and a growing chorus of newspapers and public officials have chimed in too, but so far the team itself has refused to budge.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

There’s a new kind of playbook for some of the athletic coaches in the Syracuse City School District. The district is teaming up with Vera House to pilot a program encouraging male athletes to have healthy relationships, especially with the women in their lives.

Coaches for Nottingham High School's football team, freshman basketball team and modified soccer team will be dealing with more than X’s an O’s when the season starts. They will also carry a playbook and flip cards that have topics like "Disrespecting Behavior towards Girls," and "Understanding Consent."

Joseph Gilbert / via Flickr

Earning a varsity letter in high school for playing sports will mean better jobs and increased philanthropy later in life. That's the consensus of new research from Cornell University.

Two coinciding studies looked at the success of people who played a sport in school. The first asked potential employers and co-workers to look at extra-curricular activities of potential hires.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

A special work group at Syracuse University has laid out several options in case the Carrier Dome is ever incapacitated.

The group has come up with a back-up plan to deal with the 275 events that happen in SU’s iconic stadium.

So what would happen to Syracuse University's most high profile sports if the Carrier Dome became inoperable for a long period of time?

Keith Allison / via Flickr

The U.S. Patent Office has canceled the trademark of the Washington Redskins professional football team, ruling that it is offensive to Native Americans. 

It was efforts from the Oneida Indian Nation that put the name back in the spotlight.

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board ruled Wednesday the Redskins nickname is "disparaging of Native Americans" and will no longer be protected. Patent law disallows the use of offensive names as trademarks.

Keith Allison / via Flickr

A group of New York state lawmakers are joining a growing national push for the pro football team the Washington Redskins to change its name.

The group plans to introduce a resolution in the state legislature denouncing the football team's use of the word "redskin" and urging team owner Daniel Snyder to pick a new name.

"The word is absolutely offensive to the Native American community and beyond," said Democratic Assemblyman Keith Wright, noting names like New York Giants and Jets are not offensive, except maybe to broken down jet engines.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The sports stadium expert advising Syracuse University in the recent debate over building a new stadium on Syracuse’s east side, says the future of a stadium for Syracuse sports is still under discussion. The urgency of the plan now is nowhere near what it was earlier this year, when a potential pot of state money could have become available.

Irwin Raij, of Foley and Lardner, the law firm SU hired as a consultant, says the stadium study conducted late last year was worth it for a couple of reasons.

Herald Post / via Flickr

As human pyramids get taller, jumps and throws higher, and tumbles more elaborate, cheerleading in New York state will come under more regulation.

The state Board of Regents Tuesday gave the final approval to make cheering a sport starting next school year. It was a four year effort for state coordinators.

"What it does, is it just brings that legitimacy to the sport and that recognition to the sport that we for so long have tried to bring to these athletes," said Nina Baker, the cheerleading coordinator for Section III athletics in central New York.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

It's the first full day of the Major League Baseball season. And it's also the first day of the high school baseball season in New York.

Opening day should elicit familiar sights and sounds, like the crack of the bat and the roar of the crowd. Not the sound of a shovel scraping ice, but that's what is more familiar as central New York baseball teams get ready to play.

This stubbornly cold spring is delaying the start of baseball season and keeping teams indoors.

Keith Allison / Flickr

The Oneida Indian Nation in upstate New York supports the creation of a new foundation by Washington D.C.'s professional football team, though it says it's not a solution.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

A small group of family and friends made the arrivals lounge at the Syracuse airport sound more like the bottom on the Olympic luge track Thursday evening. They were welcoming home Remsen, N.Y. native and Olympic medalist Erin Hamlin.

Hamlin became the first American to ever medal in singles luge when she slid to bronze at the Sochi Winter Games this month.

"It's a different world for her right now," her mother, Eileen Hamlin, said.

Almost 700 athletes will file into the OnCenter in downtown Syracuse this evening to kick-off this year’s New York Special Olympic Games.

The OnCenter will also host floor hockey competition. Alpine skiing will be at Greek Peak. And there are snowshoeing and cross-country ski races too.

Stacey Eder, the volunteer coordinator for the Special Olympics, says having their annual event coincide with the Winter Olympics in Russia will add to the excitement.

sam_churchhill / via Flickr

Mohawk Valley native Erin Hamlin has become the first American to win an Olympic medal in singles luge.

Hamlin slid to a third place finish and a bronze medal today at the winter games in Sochi, Russia. 

It was her third time completing in the Olympics. She was world champion in 2009, but she had finished out of the top 10 at the last two games.

The 27-year-old is from Remsen, N.Y., about 20 miles north of Utica.

"I'm sure everyone at home is going crazy," Hamlin told the Associated Press, "and I can't wait to get home to see them."

Ashley Hirtzel / WBFO

Special mouth guards and helmets marketed to help reduce concussions may not actually provide any additional protection for football players a new report claims. The findings are from a 2012 study that followed 1,332 high school athletes during a season.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO

Following the tragic deaths of several high school football players across the country, the sport's rules and practices are being scrutinized. Recent rule changes are protecting helmetless players, and some coaches in the region say it's bringing common sense back to the game.

On a chilly evening, the Oswego Buccaneers varsity football team hustles down the field against the Nottingham Bulldogs, its quarterback lobbing a well placed ball to an open receiver.

Dr. Lewis B. O'Donnell Media Summit / mediasummit.org

Get in the Game! The 9th annual Dr. Lewis B. O'Donnell Media Summit occuring in Waterman Theater on the SUNY Oswego campus this November 6. This year panelists discussed the world of sports and sports broadcasting.

The full broadcast is available below:

Panelists:

John Kucko - '87

Move Along Incorporated

Advocates for the disabled in central New York want to encourage more participation in inclusion sports.  

Greg Cullen, founder of the group Move Along Inc., said the idea is that people with physical limitations and able-bodied people can play sports together.

"You really get confidence," Cullen said. "You then are willing to engage or approach other individuals, that typically, maybe before you had an awkwardness or a fear of doing. And these types of activities can increase that confidence, so these people can continue to engage."  

Keith Allison / via Flickr

The Oneida Indian Nation says it was disappointed the National Football League defended its Washington team using the name Redskins in a meeting between the two parties.

Representatives from the nation met for an hour on Wednesday with senior league executives. The meeting was moved up a few weeks, but did not happen on Oneida territory in upstate New York as the nation had hoped.

The Oneida say the use of the name 'Redskins' is racist and offensive to Native Americans.

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