sugar

This week: Touch in chemo, pediatric anesthesia, more

Mar 15, 2017

An Upstate nurse practitioner was surprised to learn through her own research that patients undergoing chemotherapy are not necessarily bothered by the constant touching they undergo in treatment.

What matters more, according to a nursing journal article by nurse practitioner Katherine “Kitty” Leonard and College of Nursing professor Melanie Kalman, PhD, is the quality of the caregiver/patient relationship. Whether a caregiver's touch is painful or intrusive is less important than whether the caregiver shows respect and dignity, they explain on this week’s show.

Al Case/Flickr

It’s common knowledge that eating sugar does no favors for a body. But is sugar having worse effects than just adding empty calories to our diets?

Award winning investigative science journalist and cofounder of the Nutrition Science Initiative Gary Taubes discusses the detrimental effects that excessive sugar consumption has on people, and how “excessive” may be actually a lot lower than you might think. Taubes is the author of the new book, "The Case Against Sugar."

Making a case against sugar

Feb 17, 2017
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Scientific evidence continues to grow about the negative impacts of consuming sugar. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with investigative science journalist Gary Taubes. Taubes is the author of the new book "The Case against Sugar" and argues that sugar is as unhealthy as smoking.

Choosing among natural sugars and artificial sweeteners can be daunting.

Fortunately, much of the information you need about sweeteners is on the food’s label, allowing you to see the calories, carbohydrates and other nutritional information, says Maureen Franklin, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Upstate Medical University.

Franklin also explains differences among the various sweeteners and how they can affect individuals differently, as well as the key factors in all dietary decisions.

Is the brain connected to the gut?

Jun 26, 2015

In recent years, medical researchers have been discovering more about the link between gut health and overall health. This week's on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," neurologist and author Dr. David Perlmutter talks about the idea that microbes in the gut could affect neurological conditions. Dr. Perlmutter writes about explores this connection in his book “Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain – For Life.”  

More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Sunday evening at 6:30 p.m.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

 

There are two new hall of famers in Northern New York, but they didn’t get into the Baseball Hall of Fame, they got into the Male Hall of Fame. Those who’ve dedicated their lives to making the perfect pancake breakfast possible are recognized with the highest honor in the industry.

The American Maple Museum in Croghan, NY is home of the only Maple Hall of Fame in the country, but the industry is pushing for maple to go beyond the breakfast table.

It's serious business at The Maple Hall of Fame. The induction ceremony begins with a prayer by Jane Yancey.

The dangers of having a sweet tooth

Feb 15, 2015
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Sugar is in a lot of the foods you consume every day, but not all sugar is created equal. Whether it’s refined, naturally occurring, or added – sugar should be eaten sparingly, according to this week’s guest, because addiction to sugar is very real and very possible. And it’s not just the addition to sugar that’s a problem, it’s the damage it can do to your body.

This week on “Take Care,” James DiNicolantonio explains what causes sugar addiction and helps us differentiate healthy and harmful sugars. DiNicolantonio is a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri.

How sugar impacts the brain and body

Feb 13, 2015

For years, nutritionists have been pushing Americans to eat more vegetables and fewer desserts. But emerging research is increasingly showing the damage eating too much sugar can do to our health. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with James DiNicolantonio, a cardiovascular research scientist at St. Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City and a leading authority on the effects of sugar on the body.

Lorraine Rapp: So what is it about sugar that makes it so harmful?

The symptoms of epilepsy may appear differently in senior citizens than in younger people, which makes the diagnosis tricky and can lead to incorrect treatment, says Dr. Rebecca O’Dwyer, a neurologist at Upstate Medical University.

She says the incidence of epilepsy in older adults is on the rise and about half of the cases are caused by strokes. Symptoms do not always include convulsions, though.