Take Care

Sock selection: know your options

Mar 18, 2017
Daniel Max / Flickr

From dressy to athletic, cotton to bamboo, there is a wide selection of socks to choose from nowadays. But with all the brands, varieties, and purposes of these different socks, it can be hard to decide which are right for you. To find out more, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Victoria Foley, a podiatrist and foot surgeon, who is board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery, to hear her take on the many socks available on the market.

Should exercise be prescribed by doctors?

Mar 17, 2017
Charlene N Simmons / WRVO News

Most medical researchers agree -- Exercise is good for you. But a recent study shows that most physicians do not have the training or expertise to help their patients make exercise part of their health regime. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports medicine physician, about prescribing exercise. Metzl practices at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

Genetics and cancer: why testing can aid prevention

Mar 11, 2017
lorna / Flickr

No one wants to talk about cancer. A disease that has taken the lives of so many, even the word itself has an ominous connotation. But as much as we don’t want to talk about it, new genetic technology suggests that starting the conversation about your family’s cancer history might be in everyone’s best interest.

In her new book, "A Cancer in the Family: Take Control of your Genetic Inheritance," Dr. Theodora Ross addresses how our family’s medical history plays a role in our health. To shed some light on the genetics of cancer, as well as genetic counseling, Ross spoke with “Take Care” to explain the importance of knowing your family history. Ross, a cancer geneticist, is director of University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center’s cancer genetics program.

Should you avoid aspartame?

Mar 11, 2017
Steve Snodgrass / Flickr

The harmful effects sugar can have on the body has been given a lot of attention. Known for sabotaging diets and packing on extra calories, many people try to avoid sugar by seeking out artificial sweeteners as an alternative. But according to a new study by the Harvard Medical School, one common sugar substitute, aspartame, could be sabotaging your diet, too. And ironically enough, it is often used most in “diet” products (diet soda, for example).

To understand more about this study, this week on “Take Care” Dr. Richard Hodin, professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, discusses the effects of aspartame on the body.

Cancer and your family

Mar 10, 2017

Cancer is a scary word and people are often reluctant to talk about. That can make it difficult to find out about your family history of the disease. And even if you do know that many of your relatives have had cancer, would you get tested for it yourself? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Theodora Ross, who directs the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center's Cancer Genetics Program.

Shared housing: an option for the elderly

Mar 4, 2017
Skip Kuebel / Flickr

In recent years, the baby boomer generation has seen a rise in shared housing, or a “Golden Girls” style of living, where rather than living alone, elderly people opt for roommates. There are plenty of reasons for older individuals, namely women, to consider living with a roommate or two, and to find out about some of those reasons, “Take Care” spoke with author, journalist, and baby boomer expert Sally Abrahms.

Cold sores and canker sores: What's the difference?

Mar 4, 2017
AJC1 / Flickr

Whether caused by infection, injury, or stress, cold sores and canker sores are a common occurrence for many of us. Undoubtedly, they’re both very irritating, but is there a difference between the two? To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Mark Burhenne, a tenured dentist and the expert behind the popular website, “Ask the Dentist: Oral Health for Total Wellness.”

Why 'Golden Girls' trend is growing

Mar 3, 2017
MTSOfan / Flickr

Remember the TV comedy "The Golden Girls"? The idea of four single senior women living together may have provided the fictional backdrop for plenty of humor. But in real life, more people are choosing to live with roommates in retirement for serious reasons. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Sally Abrahms, a nationally recognized expert on baby boomers and seniors and an award-winning journalist who has written about this trend.

Matt Madd/Flickr

Having aches or pains, or just feeling stressed? You might want to consider taking up yoga.

This week on Take Care, yoga practitioner, teacher and chief ambassador for Yoga Alliance Andrew Tanner discusses the benefits yoga can have on the mind, body, and maybe even spirit, along with what style of yoga might be best for you.

On the dangers of smoke: first, second and thirdhand

Feb 25, 2017
Tom Sinon / Flickr

Most of us are aware of the harmful effects smoking can have on the body. From heart attacks to lung cancer, there’s no question that smoke inhalation has some nasty consequences.

To find out more about those consequences, Dr. Norman Edelman, senior scientific advisor of the American Lung Association, joined “Take Care” for a conversation on different smoking methods, as well as secondhand and thirdhand smoke.

A closer look at smoking and its effects, in any form

Feb 24, 2017

Research shows that inhaling smoke from cigarettes increases your risk of lung cancer and other disease. But is it the carcinogens found in the tobacco or the smoke itself that causes the increase? Secondhand smoke, which has a different composition, is thought of as equally dangerous. And what about thirdhand smoke that lingers on fabrics and in homes?

This week on "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Dr. Norman Edelman about smoking and its effects. Edelman is a senior scientific advisor with the American Lung Association.

Al Case/Flickr

It’s common knowledge that eating sugar does no favors for a body. But is sugar having worse effects than just adding empty calories to our diets?

Award winning investigative science journalist and cofounder of the Nutrition Science Initiative Gary Taubes discusses the detrimental effects that excessive sugar consumption has on people, and how “excessive” may be actually a lot lower than you might think. Taubes is the author of the new book, "The Case Against Sugar."

Making a case against sugar

Feb 17, 2017
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Scientific evidence continues to grow about the negative impacts of consuming sugar. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with investigative science journalist Gary Taubes. Taubes is the author of the new book "The Case against Sugar" and argues that sugar is as unhealthy as smoking.

Bedbugs and bacteria: What’s lingering in your linens?

Feb 11, 2017
Marco / Zak/Flickr

When someone checks into a hospital or hotel, the last thing on their mind is the sheets they’re lying on. But those sheets have the potential to be deadly if they aren’t properly washed between patients or guests.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Philip Tierno, Clinical Professor in the Departments of Microbiology and Pathology at the NYU School of Medicine and author of "The Secret Life of Germs: Observations and Lessons from a Microbe Hunter" discusses what might be hiding out in the bedsheets of hospitals and hotels—and the impacts it could have on your health.

The word on cranberries for UTI treatment

Feb 11, 2017
Cheri Neufeld / Flickr

For many a generation, mothers and grandmothers alike have sworn by cranberry juice as a suitable home remedy for urinary tract infections (UTIs).

To understand the science behind this treatment option, Dr. Rose Khavari, assistant professor of urology at the Institute for Academic Medicine at Houston Methodist Hospital, joined “Take Care” for a conversation on UTIs and the effectiveness of cranberry juice and cranberry supplements.

Keeping sheets sanitary & germ-free

Feb 10, 2017
jurek d. / Flickr

There's nothing nicer than clean sheets and towels. But can dirty linens actually be unhealthy? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Philip Tierno, a microbiologist at the NYU School of Medicine, about how hospitals and hotels should be cleaning their bedsheets -- and what you can catch if they don't. Tierno is also the author of "The Secret Life of Germs: Observations and Lessons from a Microbe Hunter."

Alternative therapies -- safe and effective?

Feb 4, 2017
Jena Al-Awadhi / Flickr

Everyone wants to feel their best, but with so many products on the health market, it can be difficult to know which are truly effective. Today, many medical consumers are turning to alternative medicines and therapies in an effort to increase their overall health and well-being. So which ones are safe, and which actually work?

To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Josephine Briggs, director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. A Harvard and Yale-trained physician, Briggs researches and reports on various therapies to provide the public with the information necessary to decide whether a certain practice is beneficial.

Getting your calcium – dairy vs. dietary supplements

Feb 4, 2017
Guy Montag/Flickr

Calcium is essential for healthy bones, but could getting it from supplements be doing more harm than good?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Taylor Wallace, affiliate professor in the department of Nutrition and Food Studies at George Mason University and former senior director of science, policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation, discusses the effects that taking calcium supplements could have on cardiovascular health.

Calcium supplement controversy

Feb 3, 2017
Catherine Loper / WRVO News

Many people try to increase their consumption of calcium to help prevent osteoperosis. But there has been some research that indicates that calcium supplements could increase the risk of heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Taylor Wallace, a professor in nutrition and food studies at George Mason University, about the controversy over calcium supplements. Wallace is also the former senior director of science policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Ano Lobb / Flickr

More and more Americans are seeking non-traditional therapies to find relief from symptoms and pain and to maintain overall health. But if you're a medical consumer interested in complementary or integrative treatments, how do you know what's safe and what's effective? One reliable source is the National Institutes of Health.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Josephine Briggs, director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at NIH gives an overview of these kinds of therapies – and what to look out for. A Harvard- and Yale-trained physician, Briggs is recognized internationally for her research accomplishments. The center she heads investigates and researches these therapies and informs the general public of their findings.

Hotels for hospital patients

Jan 28, 2017
Elizabeth Greene / Flickr

Would you prefer to stay in a hospital or a hotel? If you’re in need of medical treatment, you may now have the option to choose.

This week on “Take Care,” The New York Times reporter C.J. Hughes discusses the rise of hospital-hotel rooms and “medical tourism,” a trend he covered in his article “Trading Hospital Rooms for Hotel Suites.”

Liver health impacted by circadian clock

Jan 21, 2017
Brendan Landis / Flickr

When we think of our “body clock,” sleep patterns are probably what first come to mind. But new research in the field of chronobiology -- the science of biological rhythms -- indicates certain organs have their own rhythm and clock. And altering the pattern of those rhythms can harm your health.

This week on “Take Care,” Shannon Bailey, a professor of pathology  and environmental health sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, discusses the importance of the metabolic clock of the liver. Bailey’s research investigates how genetic, environmental, and life-style factors influence liver diseases.

Daniel Cukler / Flickr

While many agree that it’s good practice to eat vegetables regularly, what about going all-in and committing to a vegetarian diet? These days, leading health experts point to the diet’s many benefits, as long as you do your homework. Should you include eggs and dairy? How much protein is essential to good health? How do you eat a balanced and nutritious vegetarian diet?

This week on “Take Care,” advice on how to eat a healthy vegetarian diet from one of the nation’s top experts on nutrition, Dr. Donald Hensrud. Hensrud is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller “The Mayo Clinic Diet.” He’s also chair of the Division of Preventive, Occupations and Aerospace Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Spice health heroes

Jan 14, 2017
Simply_Happy / Flickr

All amateur cooks have them in their pantries – spices. But some spices can provide more than just flavor, they can provide health benefits.

This week on “Take Care,” chef and author Natasha MacAller discusses the healing power of spices. MacAller wrote "Spice Health Heroes: Unlock the Power of Spice for Flavor and Wellbeing." It's a cookbook that includes a detailed study of the history and traditional uses of spices along with their culinary, nutritional and medical applications.

Increased media use and its toll on relationships

Jan 14, 2017
Pablo Romeo / Flickr

With technology at our fingertips and connections easier than ever to make, you’d think we’d all have fulfilling relationships with people near and far. But even in our highly-connected world, we’re becoming less capable of forming and functioning in relationships.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Vinita Mehta talks about why so many people feel disconnected. Dr. Mehta is a licensed clinical psychologist, journalist and media expert. Her article, “Have We Become Less Capable of Forming Relationships?” appears in Psychology Today’s Head Games blog.

Spice up your health

Jan 13, 2017
Tony Mendez / Flickr

Many of us think of spices as just ingredients for cooking. But for centuries, some have believed in their medicinal powers. And science is proving some of that ancient lore to be correct. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Natasha MacAller, the author of the book "Spice Health Heroes: Unlock the Power of Spice for Flavor and Wellbeing," about the basics of spices and their health properties.

Culture, contagions & epic epidemics

Jan 7, 2017

Recent epidemics like Ebola and the Zika virus worried health officials and ordinary citizens alike. But they paled in comparison to some historical outbreaks like the bubonic plague and the Spanish flu. Outbreaks of disease fascinate and scare us, but more importantly, inform us about how to cope with the next fast-spreading contagion that comes along.

This week on “Take Care,” the author of a new book explores the history-making epidemics and what can be learned from them. Beth Skwarecki is a science writer for publications including Public Health Perspectives, Lifehacker, Science Magazine, and Scientific American. Her new book is "Outbreak!: 50 Tales of Epidemics That Terrorized the World."

Why finding a gym is 'kind of like a relationship'

Jan 7, 2017
Mike_fleming / Flickr

Gyms can run the gamut. On one end, an upscale gym can supply fresh towels, personal training, a sauna, racquet ball courts and a full schedule of the best new exercise classes. On the other, you may find yourself waiting in line for a treadmill, wondering when the weights were last cleaned and avoiding the changing rooms altogether.

Joining us this week on “Take Care,” is Anna Medaris Miller, who is a health and wellness reporter at U.S. News & World Report. Miller shares advice on finding the right gym for you.

What epidemics tell us about society

Jan 6, 2017

The Zika and Ebola epidemics have caused concern around the world about how to fight the spread of these diseases. But the way experts approached these health crises was influenced by past experience. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Beth Skwarecki, science writer and author of the book "Outbreak!: 50 Tales of Epidemics that Terrorized the World" about the history of epidemics, how societies deal with them, and why we find them so interesting.

Doby Photography / NPR

Every year, the Take Care production team tries to bring our listeners the most relevant, interesting and current topics in health and wellness. Our aim is to bring you the information you need from the nation’s experts, but we’re not the only ones with this goal.

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