Take Care

5:34am

Fri January 31, 2014
Health

Food packaging does more than protect food

Every day, American consumers rely on the cans, bottles, boxes and plastic that food is sold in to keep them safe. In fact, scientists research how food packaging can help preserve food and extend shelf life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss, director of the school of packaging at Michigan State University about the science of food packaging.

Linda Lowen: Every package protects its contents, but what is it providing protection against?

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5:34am

Fri January 24, 2014
Health

Transitioning from child to caregiver

When aging parents are diagnosed with a chronic illness or terminal disease, often roles are reversed and adult children become the caregivers. The transition can be difficult, but extremely important to the parent's quality of life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, about how to deal with this stage of life.

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8:12am

Fri January 17, 2014
Health

Can playing as an adult be good for you?

Eugene Kim Flickr

You may think playtime is just for children, but research is showing that spending time just playing may be good for your health as an adult. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Gwen Gordon, an expert in the scientific benefits of play.

Lorraine Rapp: What can you tell us about the actual health benefits of play?

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7:01pm

Sun January 5, 2014
Health

Take Care Year in Review

“Take Care” welcomes the new year by celebrating the one that just passed. We've condensed our shows from 2013 into a half hour of the best of "Take Care" -- vital advice from the leading experts on how to stay healthy and well in the new year and beyond. 

2013 marked the debut of “Take Care.” The show’s tagline, "a conversation on health and wellness," highlights the basic premise that underscores this show: What could we learn if we sat down with some of the world's top authorities in medicine, science and wellness and asked them for their most essential advice?

Out of the dozens of guests Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen spoke to in 2013, we selected nine experts whose practical advice for improving your health is relatively easy to incorporate. They explain why even the smallest investment in your health can have huge returns.

Click 'Read More' to hear "Take Care Year in Review"

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9:46am

Fri January 3, 2014
Health

How to 'Take Care' in 2014

Many people make resolutions to be healthier this time of year -- whether that involves nutrition, exercise, or stress reduction. WRVO's weekly health show "Take Care" offers some suggestions if you're still trying to decide how to improve your wellness. Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen take a look back at the advice some of the experts they interviewed offered listeners in 2013.

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7:01pm

Sun December 22, 2013
Health

Why is the U.S. facing a physician shortage?

Mercy Health Flickr

As current physicians get older, a recent trend shows that there aren’t enough potential physicians to replace them. Some projections say that by the end of the decade, there will be a shortfall of 90,000 doctors, causing what many are calling a doctor shortage. What happens when there aren’t enough around?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Atul Grover discusses the causes of the nation’s doctor shortage. Dr. Grover is chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Trained as a general internist, Dr. Grover now holds faculty appointments at the George Washington University School of Medicine, and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Grover.

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7:00pm

Sun December 22, 2013
Health

How female friendships improve health after 50

Flavia Aste Flickr

Ask women to name the relationships that make their lives meaningful, and female friendships will likely rank high on the list. But having good friends means a great deal more than fun times and girls’ nights out. As women age, their friendships with other women may offer significant health benefits. Recent studies indicate that women can change one another's brain chemistry for the better.

This week on Take Care, Suzanne Braun Levine discusses what makes female friendships so important, especially for older women. Levine is a writer, editor and nationally recognized authority on women and family issues and media. The first editor of Ms. magazine, she was also the first woman editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. Her e-book, "You Gotta Have Girlfriends: A Post-Fifty Posse is Good For Your Health," is the fourth installment in her series, which examines women in “second adulthood.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Suzanne Braun Levine.

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5:34am

Fri December 20, 2013
Health

Experts say a doctor shortage is on the way

Many experts believe the United States is facing a doctor shortage in the not-too-distant future. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Atul Grover, the chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges about why there may not be enough physicians and what could be done about it.

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7:00pm

Sun December 15, 2013
Health

Hip hip hooray! One of the most common joint replacement procedures greatly improved

Don't give up tennis just yet, joint replacement surgery could keep you moving well into old age.
Ebb and Flow Photography Flickr

In the past, hip replacement surgeries were generally reserved for elderly people. Long recovery times and expensive materials sometimes deterred people from getting the procedure. But, as minimally invasive techniques and materials have improved in recent years, the population of people getting hip replacements has changed as a result.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Seth Greenky discusses the current state of hip replacement surgeries. An associate professor in orthopedics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY, Dr. Greenky also co-directs the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph’s Hospital, also in Syracuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Greenky.

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7:32am

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Hip replacement advancements help young and old alike

A double hip replacement.
Tim Samoff Flickr

More than 300,000 hip replacements are performed each year, and advancements in the surgery are giving hope to baby boomers who want to continue their active lives. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Seth Greenky, a surgeon and co-director of the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph's Hospital about how hip replacements work, whether you're in your 20s or your 90s.

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7:01pm

Sun December 8, 2013
Health

Get some shuteye: why a good night's sleep is important to your health

Michael Mandiberg Flickr

Depending on how much we get, sleep can either be our best friend or our worst enemy. A good night’s sleep can make us feel refreshed and rejuvenated, while a bad night’s sleep can leave us feeling moody and groggy. So exactly how much rest is needed to call it a good night’s sleep?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Orfeu Buxton discusses sleep deprivation. Buxton is assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, associate neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He participated in a recent Q&A on sleep featured in the New York Times.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Buxton.

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7:00pm

Sun December 8, 2013
Health

Does a healthy gut mean a healthy body?

mellowynk Flickr

Emerging research reveals that good digestion and a healthy digestive tract are dependent on beneficial bacteria, also known as probiotics. But you don't have to buy special yogurt to add probiotics to your diet. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi also aid in digestion and improve your immune system. Once you learn the basics of fermenting, it can be a fun and inexpensive way to preserve food at home and add essential nutrients.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy explains the benefits of eating fermented foods. Jeanroy is a newspaper editor, food writer and co-author of the book, "Fermenting for Dummies," published earlier this year. She's been making and eating fermented foods for 20 years and shares her love of preparing food at home on her website, TheFarmingWife.com.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

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7:46am

Fri December 6, 2013
Health

How much sleep is enough?

Tony Alter Flickr

Getting a good night's sleep is easier for some people than others. But research has shown it's essential for everyone. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Orfeu Buxton, a neuroscientist and sleep researcher from Harvard, about the health issues a lack of sleep can cause.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you tell us what role does sleep play in our overall health?

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7:01pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Don't be afraid, social anxiety is beatable

Cavale Doom Flickr

We're at that time of year when holiday parties and social activities crowd our social calendar. You may dread the office party and worry about what to wear, but that's a common anxiety many of us face.  But according to the National Institutes of Health, millions of Americans suffer from something much worse -- extreme fear of being scrutinized and judged by others. When the fear is so debilitating it disrupts daily life, it’s social anxiety disorder, a chronic mental health condition also known as social phobia.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, discusses social anxiety and how to overcome the disorder. Zasio is a nationally-known clinical psychologist who specializes in this field. She's familiar to many from her appearances on the A&E television series “Hoarders.” Zasio is also the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

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7:00pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline

Liz Henry Flickr

Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Sherry Willis, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.

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5:39am

Fri November 22, 2013
Health

Overcoming fear important factor in controlling social anxiety

Millions of Americans suffer from social anxiety disorder, an extreme fear of being judged by others in social situations. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with doctor Robin Zasio, a nationally known clinical psychologist and author about what social anxiety disorder is and how to treat it.

Lorraine Rapp: would you explain the difference between just being shy and actual social anxiety?

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6:09am

Fri November 15, 2013
Health

Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke

Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.

Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?

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7:01pm

Sun November 10, 2013
Health

Much is still unknown about Parkinson's disease

Circuits of the basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease. Picture shows 2 coronal slices have been superimposed to include the involved basal ganglia.
Credit Mikael Häggström

While Michael J. Fox may best be known for his acting, many know him as one of the leading figures in taking away the stigma against Parkinson’s disease. Fox, along with former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, boxer Muhammad Ali and singer Linda Ronstadt have all been open and frank about their diagnosis of the disease. But as more and more of the public are aware of the disease though, there is still much that is unknown about Parkinson’s disease.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelvin Chou discusses the uncertainties involved with Parkinson’s disease, as well as cutting edge ways to treat it. Dr. Chou is associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the University of Michigan Medical School, and is one of the country’s leading authorities on Parkinson’s disease. He has recently published a book for patients and families called Deep Brain Stimulation: A New Life for People with Parkinson’s, Dystonia and Essential Tremor.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Chou.

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7:00pm

Sun November 10, 2013
Health

What should men do when they have 'Low T?'

Credit DEA.gov

You’ve seen the advertisements. A middle-aged man appears to be depressed and withdrawn from his family, and his interest in sexual activity is at an all-time low. What’s wrong with him? He’s been suffering from low testosterone levels, and all of his problems can be solved with a simple supplement. The frequency of ads for testosterone supplements have increased recently, and with it, questions about how legitimate testosterone replacement therapy is.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Martin Miner discusses the facts and myths of the condition known as “low T,” or reduced levels of testosterone in men. Dr. Miner is the co-director of the Men’s Health Center and chief of Family Practice and Community Medicine at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. He’s also clinical associate professor of family medicine and urology at Brown University Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Miner.

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7:50am

Fri November 8, 2013
Health

Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment

A PET scan may be used to help diagnose Parkinson's disease.
Liz West Flickr

Parkinson's disease used to be something people didn't like to talk about. But celebrities like Michael J. Fox and Linda Ronstadt, who have been open about having the degenerative nervous disorder, have taken away some of the stigma. There is still much about Parkinson's that even the experts don't understand. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr.

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7:01pm

Sun November 3, 2013
Health

Hepatitis C -- the "silent epidemic"

Hepatitis virions.
Microbe World Flickr

The “baby boomer” generation – Americans born between 1945 and 1965, has had a big impact on American society and culture. Now a disease is having a big effect on them. Baby boomers are five times more likely to have contracted Hepatitis C than the rest of the population. With symptoms that may not appear for decades, most may not even know they have Hepatitis C until it is too late.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Bryce D. Smith explains why all baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C. Dr. Smith is a lead health scientist in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, and is the primary author of recent Hepatitis C testing recommendations that are aimed at members of the baby boomer generation.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Smith.

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7:00pm

Sun November 3, 2013
Health

How to de-stress and improve your health

bottled_void Flickr

Stress is a part of everyday life, and for some people, the workplace can be a significant cause. Sometimes, when work isn’t left at work, stress from the job can bleed into your personal life and severely affect your physical health. But, dealing with work stress can be easier than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Jane Pernotto Ehrman discusses causes of stress in the workplace and ways to deal with it. Ehrman is the lead behavioral specialist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine, in the Wellness Institute, where she develops and implements the behavioral and stress management sections of lifestyle wellness programs.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Jane Pernotto Ehrman.

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5:41am

Fri November 1, 2013
Health

Why baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C

Health providers in New York state are now required to offer a Hepatitis C test to all baby boomers. That's because about three-quarters of people who have the virus don't know they have it -- and most are in the baby boomer generation. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care” recently spoke with Dr. Bryce Smith of the Centers for Disease Control about this silent epidemic.

Lorraine Rapp: So I know there are different forms of the virus Hepatitis. This is Hepatitis C —what exactly is it and why is it so dangerous?

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7:59am

Fri October 11, 2013
Health

Do you know when to visit the emergency room?

File Photo
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The emergency room has become an integral part of the American medical system. But how do you know when you should go to the E.R.? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen about what you should know before you have to visit an emergency room.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you give us a quick overview of how emergency rooms have changed over the years—how it might affect us as patients?

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7:11am

Fri October 4, 2013
Health

Unpredictability of flu season should be motivation to get shot

paulswansen Flickr

Every year at this time, public health officials encourage Americans to get a flu vaccine, but the majority of people choose not to have a flu shot. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Bresee of the Centers for Disease Control about how the vaccine works to prevent the flu, and why the CDC recommends it.

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7:01pm

Sun September 29, 2013
Health

Compulsive "hoarding" caused by more than just nostalgia

Mark Knobil Flickr

Everyone has something they can’t quite let go, whether it’s all the back issues of their favorite magazine or their favorite sweater from 2003 that no longer fits. What happens when this feeling spreads to many other items as well, to the point where it starts to not only compromise your home, but your daily life as well.

The recent popularity of the A&E reality television show Hoarders has opened up a national conversation on the topic of compulsive hoarding, which many are starting to realize can be a serious psychological issue rather than just a strong feeling of nostalgia towards physical items.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio talks about compulsive hoarding and the treatment process for it. Dr. Zasio is a clinical psychologist that specializes in anxiety disorders. She has appeared on Hoarders, and is the author of the book “The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, and Uncluttered Life.”

 Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

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6:31am

Fri September 27, 2013
Health

New study hopes to unlock the secret to "chemo brain"

Chemotherapy can cause many side effects like hair loss and nausea. But for years, many cancer patients have said it causes something else, forgetfulness and memory loss, or what cancer survivors call "chemo brain." Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Michelle Janelsins of the University of Rochester, who is leading a research study into chemotherapy's effects on cognitive function.

Lorraine Rapp: The term “chemo brain” is relatively new. How do researchers and medical doctors actually define that term?

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7:01pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Year-round youth sports mean more injuries

wynner3 Flickr

Any casual sports fan knows that it’s football season. Just look at any high school on a Friday night or in the living rooms of Americans everywhere on Sundays. If you ask a child athlete when football season is though, their response may not be fall—it may be “all year.”

Year-round playing of a single sport is just one of the trends in youth athletics which have helped lead to an increase in youth sports injuries, according to Dr. Pietro Tonino. Dr. Tonino is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, and a leading expert on youth sports injuries.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Pietro Tonino.

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7:00pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Cherries & chocolate -- not just for dessert

D. H. Wright Flickr

What do strawberries, dark chocolate and cherries all have in common? If you guessed that they all can help with your health and wellness, you are right. If you guessed that they are all delicious, we’ll give you that too.

This week on Take Care, a conversation about folk remedies with Denise Foley, an award-winning health journalist and the Contributing Executive Editor at Prevention magazine. She's the co-author of "‪The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Children: ‪From Allergies and Animal Bites to Toothache and TV Addiction, Hundreds of Doctor-Proven Techniques and Tips to Care for Your Kid."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Denise Foley.

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7:01pm

Sun September 15, 2013
Health

Melanoma treatment breakthroughs provide hope for those in advanced stages of disease

Melanoma cancer cells.
Credit Oscar Rohena / Flickr

With early detection and treatment, melanoma is nearly 100 percent curable.  But for patients with advanced stages of melanoma, this skin cancer is often regarded as one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Now, new advances in treatment therapies have provided dramatic improvements for those whose melanoma has spread.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about how melanoma is diagnosed and the variety of treatments now available.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

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