Take Care

Keeping tennis & golf injury free this summer

Jun 4, 2016
Torrey Wiley / Flickr

Summer is approaching, and with the nicer weather, you may become more active by breaking out those golf clubs and tennis rackets. However, you could be one swing away from an elbow, wrist, or hand injury if you don't take the proper precautions.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. John Fatti tells us how these injuries can happen, and what to do to avoid them. Fatti is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in hand, wrist and elbow injuries, and he is the president of SOS -- Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists --in Syracuse, NY.

When foods sound healthy, but aren't

Jun 4, 2016
EvelynGiggles / Flickr

If you grocery shop with a healthy diet in mind, the labels “fat-free” and “sugar-free” may jump out to you. However, these foods may not be as healthy as their labels make them sound.

Many fat-free and sugar-free foods have little nutritional value, and contain additives and artificial ingredients, according to this week’s “Take Care” guest, Kerri-Ann Jennings. Jennings is a registered dietician and the former editor of Eating Well Magazine. She also writes for Yoga Journal, Men's Health, the Huffington Post, and Cooking Channel TV. Her article "8 Healthy-Sounding Foods That Aren't," appears on the Food Network website.

david__jones / Flickr

The immune system generally keeps you healthy, but there are times when these biological processes can actually harm you. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease -- which arises when the immune system mistakenly attacks its own bodily tissues.

This week, on “Take Care,” Dr. Robert Shmerling explains the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Shmerling is clinical chief of the rheumatology division of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a senior editor of internet publishing at Harvard Health Publications.

Leah Landry / WRVO

Over the last several decades, microwave ovens have become a standard kitchen appliance in many American homes. But for some, doubts remain about their safety and impact on the nutritional value of food cooked in them.

This week on “Take Care,” food scientist Don Schaffner takes us behind the microwave door to explain how microwave ovens work, and the ways this kind of cooking technology interacts with food. Schaffner is an extension specialist in food science and distinguished professor at Rutgers University. He is a world-renowned expert on food safety and protection and is the co-host of a podcast on microbial food safety.

Science & safety of microwave cooking

May 20, 2016
HomeSpot HQ / Flickr

Microwave ovens have become a staple in American kitchens. But many people do not understand the science behind how they cook food. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Don Schaffner, a food scientist and professor at Rutgers University, about how microwaves work and whether or not they are really safe.

Pseph / Flickr

It’s a difficult fact to swallow -- Americans are heavier than ever. For a number of decades, we’ve been told that dietary fat was unhealthy and eating fat would make us gain weight. Fat equals fat, right? Our guest this week explains that the equation is not that simple. The tide is turning on fat.

Dr. Mark Hyman is a physician, a nine-time New York Times bestselling author, and director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. His latest book is “Eat Fat, Get Thin,” and that’s what he believes -- we can add fats back into our diet (keeping in mind that not all fats are created equal) and stay healthy. Hyman is the founder and medical director of The UltraWellness Center, a medical editor at The Huffington Post, and has been a regular medical contributor to CBS This Morning and The Today Show.

Pictures of Money / Flickr

To many adults, having health insurance is a no-brainer. It’s something you just have to have. And now under the Affordable Care Act, it’s required to have medical insurance, or pay a penalty. Even under the new law, the age group that’s the least likely to get insurance, is the healthiest.

This week on “Take Care,” Kevin Counihan, the CEO of healthcare.gov explains all the various options young people have to get insured. Healthcare.gov is the federal government’s marketplace exchange to buy health insurance.

Insuring young adults

May 13, 2016
baasiilb15 / Flickr

 

More young adults go without health insurance than any other age group. The Affordable Care Act made it possible for anyone up to age 26 to stay on his or her parent’s medical insurance. But how exactly does that work? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Kevin Counihan, the CEO of healthcare.gov, the federal government's health care exchange.

Divorce later in life becoming more common

May 7, 2016
Edwin & Kelly Tofslie / Flickr

Over the last 10 years, divorce rates have been steadying in the U.S., with the exception of one age group.

This week on “Take Care,” journalist Abby Ellin tells us why, more and more, older couples seem to be splitting up. Ellin is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, and her work has also appeared in Time magazine and the Village Voice. Ellin's article, "After Full Lives Together, More Older Couples Are Divorcing," appeared in The New York Times last October.

Sam Howzit / Flickr

We’ve probably all seen a commercial at some point for medication to help a weak bladder, but it isn’t something we generally want to talk about if we have one.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Jenni Johnson Gabelsberg explains this problem, known as urinary incontinence, and how to fix it through physical therapy. Gabelsberg is a nationally prominent physical therapist whose focus is on pelvic floor rehabilitation. She has a doctor of physical therapy degree, and lectures widely on evaluation and treatment for female and male pelvic floor dysfunctions, such as urinary and fecal incontinence.

Good footing: The importance of knowing your type

Apr 30, 2016
myllissa / Flickr

Putting one foot in front of the other can seem like a pretty simple task. But there is actually a lot that goes into this, as the foot is one of the most complex structures of the human body.

There are 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments that connect to the foot and make it function, according to this week’s “Take Care” guest, podiatrist Dr. Neal Blitz. Blitz is a reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon, the creator of the bunionplasty bunion surgery procedure, and a fellow of the American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons.

How to keep your memory from reflecting your age

Apr 30, 2016
A Health Blog / Flickr

As you get older you may start to realize your memory isn’t as good as it once was. You have no problem recalling something that happened five years ago, but for the life of you can’t remember the name of the person’s hand you just shook five minutes ago.

This week on “Take Care,” brain health and memory expert Dr. Cynthia Green, revisits us to explain why this is, and what we can do to improve it. Green is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and is the founder of Total Brain Health. In addition, Green is also a leading authority in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Keeping your memory sharp

Apr 29, 2016

As we age, many of us may find that our memory is not what it used to be. But is there anything we can do to change that? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Cynthia Green, a psychiatrist at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and an expert on brain health and Alzheimer’s disease. They discuss ways to keep your mental edge.

Does brain age affect memory?

Apr 23, 2016
dierk schaefer / Flickr

As we age so does our brain, which often means memory loss and forgetfulness. But just in the way we exercise to keep our bodies healthy, there are exercises we can do to maintain our brain’s health and memory.

This week on “Take Care,” memory fitness and brain health expert Dr. Cynthia Green shares how we can do this. Green is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and the founder and president of Memory Arts, which provides memory fitness and brain health training. She is also a leading authority in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Jamie / Flickr

Most of us have had to take prescription medication at some point in our lives. How to take the medication is usually described on the label, but proper storage and disposal often isn’t.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Elizabeth Higdon discusses how to store and dispose of medicine in order to keep it potent, and safe from harming others and the environment. Higdon is an instructor at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences campus in Colchester, Vermont, teaches classes on over-the-counter medications, and works as a community pharmacist.

Storing & disposing of prescription drugs

Apr 22, 2016
CREDIT ONPOINT.WBUR.ORG

A doctor or pharmacist may give a patient instructions on how to take prescription medication, but how to store that drug is not often discussed. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Elizabeth Higdon, an instructor in pharmacy practice at Albany College of Pharmacy, about how to store your prescriptions to maintain their effectiveness.

Allen County (IN) Public Library / Flickr

Although playing video games may seem like a big reason some children live a sedentary lifestyle, they may also be one key to reducing obesity.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Amanda Staiano tells us about her research on how being active indoors through use of video games could reduce childhood obesity. Staiano is an assistant professor at the Pediatric Obesity and Health Behavior Lab at Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University. She also co-authored the study, "Exergames for Physical Education Courses: Physical, Social, and Cognitive Benefits," and gave a TED talk on the topic at LSU this year.

What you need to know about bedbugs

Apr 16, 2016
martakat83 / Flickr

For many years, worrying about letting the bedbugs bite wasn’t something most Americans had to think about before going to sleep. But over the past decade or so they seem to have come back with a vengeance.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Harold Harlan, a bedbug specialist, tells us what we need to know about bedbugs and how we can avoid them. Harlan is a retired military medical entomologist whose research through raising bedbugs has been instrumental to helping the U.S. develop a federal response to the problem. Through his work he has earned the Environmental Protection Agency's bronze medal, the highest honor the EPA bestows.

Exactly what are bedbugs?

Apr 15, 2016
Charles LeBlanc / Flickr

After virtually disappearing for years, bedbugs have returned as a public health issue in cities across the country. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Harold Harlan, a retired military medical entomologist, to find out more about bedbugs and the hazards they bring.

The science behind sensitivity

Apr 9, 2016
lungstruck / Flickr

Scary movies, large crowds, and obnoxious party lights are things that can bother all of us from time to time. But if you find yourself avoiding these types of things at all costs, you may have a trait that makes you do so.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Ted Zeff explains this trait and how those that have it are considered to be highly sensitive people, or HSP. Zeff is a leading authority on the trait of high sensitivity and holds a Ph.D. in psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies. He is also the author of several books including “The Highly Sensitive Person’s Survival Guide.”

How to make a first-time vegetable garden a success

Apr 9, 2016
nicdalic / Flickr

Having your own vegetable garden can be a delight in the warm weather—picture being able to open the door and pick fresh vegetables for dinner. But if you’ve never gardened before, getting started can seem a bit tricky.

This week on “Take Care,” gardening expert Amy Jeanroy lets us in on the makings of a successful garden. Jeanroy covers herb gardening for the how-to website About.com, and has operated a family greenhouse business for the past 15 years. She's also the author of “Canning and Preserving for Dummies.”

Psychologists and researchers are increasingly coming to understand the idea that some people are more sensitive than others to things like noises, smells and upsetting situations. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen explore the condition of being a highly sensitive person with psychologist and author Ted Zeff, an expert on the topic.

The hidden world of bacteria that lives inside us

Apr 2, 2016
Caroline Davis2010 / Flickr

What if we were more bacteria than human? You might imagine we’d be a walking sickness that was never healthy, looking to latch on to the next person to live on. But the truth is—we are.

There are more bacterial cells that make up the human body than our own cells. But just because they’re bacterial cells doesn’t mean they’re bad for us. In fact, they sustain human life. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Raphael Kellman tells us how the bacteria that live in our bodies can determine and improve our health. Kellman is an internist, a pioneer in holistic medicine, and founder of the Kellman Center for Functional and Integrative Medicine in Manhattan. He's also the author of "The Microbiome Diet: The Scientifically Proven Way to Restore Your Gut Health and Achieve Permanent Weight Loss." 

Don't hide your age, celebrate it

Apr 2, 2016
Jeff Simms / Flickr

When we’re teenagers we can’t wait to grow up. Then we move out and realize—being an adult is hard. Then we think how we can’t wait to be even older so the hard stuff can stop being hard. Then we get older and wish we were young again. Aging is something we all do and all think about at some point in our lives, but is one of the aspects of our bodies we have no control over.

This week on “Take Care,” Gina Barreca talks about the dreaded process of aging, and why it shouldn’t be so dreaded. Barreca is a professor of English and feminist theory at the University of Connecticut, a columnist for the Hartford Courant, has appeared on The Today Show, CNN, NPR and Oprah to discuss gender, power, politics, and humor. She is the author of “They Used to Call Me Snow White But I Drifted: Women’s Strategic Use of Humor” and "If You Lean In, Will Men Just Look Down Your Blouse?"

Why is getting old a bad thing?

Apr 1, 2016
MTSOfan / Flickr

With any luck, getting old is something that happens to all of us. So why does aging sometimes seem like a dirty word? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Gina Barreca, a professor of English and feminist theory at the University of Connecticut and a columnist with The Hartford Courant, about society's views on aging.

What are freckles and why do some have more than others?

Mar 26, 2016
Frédéric Poirot / Flickr

The reason why our skin is light or dark can date back to evolution thousands of years ago. People that originated in places with high sun exposure have darker pigmented skin to protect them from the rays of the sun, and those that originated in areas with low sun exposure have lighter pigmented skin. But what is it about the pigment of our skin that causes freckles?

Dr. Emmy Graber can answer this question. This week on “Take Care,” the dermatologist and former director of the Boston University Cosmetic and Laser Center, and current president and founder of the Dermatology Institute of Boston, speaks with us about what a freckle is and why we have them.

When babies refuse to eat

Mar 25, 2016

Feeding a baby may seem like one of the most natural things possible. But many infants end up on feeding tubes because of various medical conditions. Then once the illness is resolved, the baby refuses to eat. That's what happened to Virginia Sole-Smith and her one-month old baby Violet. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Sole-Smith, a journalist who has written about her daughter's experience with the condition of oral aversion.

Why some might keep their cancer a secret

Mar 19, 2016
Nesbitt_Photo/Flickr and Kaylyn Izzo

There are a number of diseases known to man that are incurable, some more serious than others. But if you had a serious incurable disease, would you want everyone around you to know? Or would you want to keep it to yourself?

These are questions many of us don’t have to think about, but for someone diagnosed with cancer, it may be something they put some serious thought into. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mindy Greenstein discusses some of the problems cancer can cause “from both sides of the hospital bed.” Greenstein is a clinical psychologist and author, a consultant in the department of psychiatry at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and is a cancer survivor herself.

What to do when allergies spring forth this season

Mar 19, 2016
Nick Antonini / Flickr

That last patch of snow on your lawn is finally melting, the sun is out and warming your face, and the trees and flowers are coming back to life. Spring is in the air and you’re ready to start enjoying the outdoors again, but there’s one thing that’s slowing you down: allergies.

Spring allergies can irritate your eyes, nose, and throat and keep you from enjoying the no-longer-cold weather. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Neeta Ogden tells us what can cause those unwanted allergies and how to manage them this spring. Ogden is an adult and pediatric allergist, asthma specialist, and immunologist in New York City, and is a spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

Cancer: To share or keep secret?

Mar 18, 2016

Some cancer patients choose to be open and public about their diagnosis and treatment. But others prefer to keep their struggle with the disease a secret from anyone but their closest family and friends. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Mindy Greenstein, a psycho-oncologist who is also a cancer survivor herself. They discuss the pros and cons of both decisions
 

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