Take Care

The ins, outs and noises of MRI machines

Oct 11, 2015
Karin Beil / Flickr

MRI machines can be a tremendous help when it comes to visualizing specific areas of the body that other imaging tools just can’t capture. But how do these gigantic machines work, and what’s with that loud banging noise?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk about these magnetic resonance imaging machines with Dr. Scott Buckingham, a radiologist with CRA Medical Imaging in Syracuse, NY.

Theraputic massage relieves pain one muscle at a time

Oct 11, 2015
flattrcom / Flickr

Muscles, tendons and ligaments can be a source of a lot of pain yet they fail to show up in diagnostic tests, like x-rays.

This week on “Take Care,” Tracy Segall, the lead licensed massage therapist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Integrative and Lifestyle Medicine, talks about the benefits of massage therapy and how it can heal those “hidden” aches and pains.

The MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, has become an increasingly used diagnostic tool. But, some patients are quite apprehensive about having this test. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Scott Buckingham, a Syracuse radiologist, about the advances in MRIs and their use -- and how to cope with the test if you're claustrophobic.

Matthew / Flickr

Over the last several decades, Americans have been searching for the ultimate diet that will result in the greatest weight loss for everyone. Low-carbohydrate diets are currently among the most popular, with proponents saying they are the ticket to losing weight. But how do low-carb diets actually compare to low-fat diets?

This week on “Take Care,” we interview a researcher who studied that very question. Kevin Hall is a senior investigator at the National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases, one of the National Institutes of Health. His main research interests are the regulation of food intake, macronutrient metabolism, energy balance, and body weight.

A healthy night's sleep starts with a healthy mattress

Oct 4, 2015
Flashy Soup Can / Flickr

Doctors do not prescribe mattresses, yet they can be the cause of countless aches and pains. Mattresses are important but what goes into choosing the right one?

This week on “Take Care,” Ed Perratore, senior editor for Consumer Reports, looks at how the right mattress can make all the difference.

Low-carb vs. low-fat: which diet works better?

Oct 2, 2015

Low-carb diets are currently very popular, and have been extolled for everything from helping lose weight to preventing disease. One group of scientists decided to test a low-carb diet head-to-head with a low fat diet to see which one caused dieters to lose more body fat. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the leader of the study, Kevin Hall, a senior investigator at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.

Jon Curnow / Flickr

Have you tried to make a change in your life to better your health and failed? You’re not alone. Whether it’s changing your diet, exercising more, or quitting smoking, one expert says it’s probably because you’re not using something called “design thinking.”

This week on “Take Care,” we interview Dr. Kyra Bobinet. She discussed how design thinking can revolutionize the way you go about making changes in your life in her just-released book, “Well-Designed Life: 10 Lessons in Brain Science & Design Thinking for a Mindful, Healthy, & Purposeful Life.”

What to do about dandruff

Sep 27, 2015
Joseph Tame / Flickr

While it may not be a health issue, it may be a serious embarrassment. Dandruff can make its way from your scalp to your shoulders  in what seems like seconds after you shower.  How can you make those flakes go away?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber joins us with her recommendations for getting rid of dandruff. Graber is director of the Dermatology Institute of Boston.

Designing how you change your life

Sep 25, 2015

If you're trying to make a change regarding your health -- like quitting smoking or altering your diet -- any of us go all-in and try to immediately adjust our behavior all at once. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kyra Bobinet, a physician and scientist who has authored the just-released book, “Well-Designed Life: 10 Lessons in Brain Science & Design Thinking for a Mindful, Healthy, & Purposeful Life.” They discuss how using the concept of design can help us be successful and making changes.

The art of seeking a second opinion

Sep 20, 2015
Alex E. Proimos / Flickr

Seeking a second medical opinion can be an awkward process. No one wants hurt feelings but everyone wants what is best for them.

This week on “Take Care,” Erin Singleton, the chief of mission delivery at the Patient Advocate Foundation, addresses the importance of seeking a second medical opinion.

R. Nial Bradshaw / Flickr

Many people think a headache is not a big deal, and they can just tough it out. But experts say that's not always the best idea.

This week on "Take Care," we talk to Dr. Mark Green, director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.  Green discusses the different types of headaches, how to treat them, and debunks some headache myths.

Seeking a second opinion

Sep 18, 2015

When you or a loved one receives a diagnosis and a doctor is urging you to act quickly, your first instinct might be to just do it. Then someone suggests that perhaps a second opinion might be a good idea. But that may seem like it's easier said than done. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Erin Singleton, chief of mission delivery of the nonprofit Patient Advocate Foundation, about when to seek a second opinion and how to go about getting one.

Ovarian cancer: why is it so hard to detect?

Sep 13, 2015
rosefirerising / flickr

The scariest trait of the fifth-leading cause of cancer death among women isn’t its symptoms, but its difficulty to be detected early.

This week on “Take Care” we talk to Dr. Martee Hensley, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, on the topic of ovarian cancer. Dr. Hensley's practice focuses on the care of women with gynecologic cancers.

Managing fall allergies

Sep 13, 2015
Vladimer Shioshvili / Flickr

Constant sneezing, itchy eyes and scratchy throats remind us of what? Allergies. Seasonal allergies can be a pain but knowing how to attack allergy season head on can make all the difference when they come rolling into town.

Dr. Neeta Ogden joins “Take Care,” this week to chat about fall allergies, what triggers them and how they can be properly handled.

Ovarian cancer causes & risk factors

Sep 11, 2015

September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. While it may not get much attention as breast cancer, ovarian cancer is the deadliest of the gynecological cancers. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with oncologist Dr. Martee Hensley of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about the risk factors for ovarian cancer and prevention measures. Dr. Hensley’s practice focuses on the care of women with gynecologic cancers.

How to prevent blood clots during travel

Aug 30, 2015
Christopher Doyle / Flickr

Blood clots can serve a lifesaving function, but they also can be deadly if they form when a person has been immobile for a long period of time. The problem is most common on a long plane flight or car trip when people might be sitting in the same cramped position for several hours.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Menaka Pai, a hematologist at the Hamilton General Hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, about why blood clots form and why they can put your life at risk. Pai is also an executive member of the organization Thrombosis Canada.

Are Fido & Fluffy disturbing your sleep?

Aug 30, 2015
Andy / Flickr

Sometimes, no matter how well trained a pet might be, it simply doesn’t want to sleep at any convenient time, keeping you up throughout the night.

This week on “Take Care,” Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Lois Krahn, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist at their Sleep Disorders Center in Arizona, on why some pets might be disturbing their owner’s sleep.

bandita / Flickr

It is human nature to squat when defecating. It was not until the invention of the modern-day toilet that humans started to sit upright for waste elimination. A new invention, the Squatty Potty, is bringing back that natural human instinct.

Dr. Rajeev Jain joins “Take Care,” this week to talk about the Squatty Potty and whether or not it really helps. Jain is the chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas and a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants.

Why long flights can lead to blood clots

Aug 28, 2015

Between weather and security concerns, commercial air travel can seem more and more difficult. But there's also a health concern associated with very long flights if you are unable to move around -- blood clots. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Menaka Pai, a professor of medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, about how blood clots form and why they can be deadly. Dr. Pai is also an executive member of the organization Thrombosis Canada.

Skley / Flickr

Each generation has their differences. Times change and people adapt but one thing that has always seemed to remain consistent is love.

Dr. Karl Pillemer, a professor of human development at Cornell, joins “Take Care,” this week to discuss his new book, “30 Lessons for Loving: Advice from the Wisest Americans on Love, Relationship and Marriage,” and how love has lasted throughout the generations.

Omega 3 fatty acids 'essential' for human body

Aug 23, 2015
Jo Christian Oterhals / Flickr

Omega 3 fatty acids are labeled as “essential,” meaning it’s something the human body needs, but can’t make itself. This means the only way to get Omega 3s is by eating certain foods.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Kerri-Ann Jennings about Omega 3s. Jennings is a registered dietician, nutritionist, as well as former editor for Eating Well Magazine.

Elders can provide 'Lessons for Loving'

Aug 21, 2015
Mr. Thomas / Flickr

The statistic is cited often. Half of marriages end in divorce. So where should young people turn to for advice on how to have a happy and healthy relationship? This week, on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with gerontologist Karl Pillemer, a professor at Cornell University. Pillemer says senior citizens offer a treasure trove of advice about love relationships. He interviewed elders for his book "30 Lessons for Loving: Advice from the Wisest Americans on Love, Relationships and Marriage."

Wellness tourism taking the vacation world by storm

Aug 16, 2015
Villa Amor / Flickr

In the past, vacations were ways for many to shed responsibilities and relax. That trend, however, seems to be as old as Disney World, as the idea of wellness trips slowly take over the vacation scene.

This week on “Take Care,” print, television, and digital journalist Ismat Sarah Mangla talks about the new travelling trend and what fuels people to be active during their vacations.

Summer woes: brain freeze and dark clothing

Aug 16, 2015
Jereme Rauckman / Flickr

Brain freeze. Most people have had one of these so-called “ice cream headaches,” but how do they happen, and why doesn’t everybody get them?

This week on “Take Care” we talk to Dr. Mark Green, director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

The uniqueness of diverticulitis and how to treat it

Aug 16, 2015
euthman / Flickr

In the medical field, the suffix ‘-itis' stands for inflammation. Bronchitis, laryngitis, etc., are all inflammatory medical problems.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Rajeev Jain tackles the unique inflammatory condition, diverticulitis. Jain is the chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas and a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants.

Betty Nudler / Flickr

Taking a vacation and a break from the stresses of everyday life may seem like a healthy thing to do in and of itself. But recently a new trend has emerged called wellness tourism. It incorporates a range of ways to get healthy while you travel. This week, On WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with journalist Ismat Sarah Mangla of International Business Times. Mangla has written about the growing business of wellness tourism.

Uncovering the mystery behind varicose veins

Aug 9, 2015
Warren Flick / Flickr

We all know that person who, when upset, has that neck vein that bulges and pulses uncontrollably. Although unsightly and intimidating, we have come to accept and expect to see those veins at times, but veins that bulge permanently are a different story.

Varicose veins are common and bulge in quite the same way, yet they remain shrouded in mystery for some people.

Dr. Jennifer Heller, assistant professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of the Johns Hopkins Vein Centers, joins “Take Care” this week to address varicose veins and uncover the mystery behind these bulging blood vessels.

In a world with 24-7 accessibility, sometimes it's hard to unplug from your job. But too much stress at work can be bad for your overall health. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with social psychologist Ron Friedman about how to promote well being and boost productivity at the same time. Friedman is also the author of the book, "The Best Place to Work: The Art and Science of Creating an Extraordinary Workplace."

Avoiding the dreaded traveler's diarrhea

Aug 2, 2015
maaco / flickr

Traveler’s diarrhea. It’s something not everybody can avoid, no matter how hard they try. But why do some contract this ailment even when taking all the necessary precautions not to?

This is the focus on this week’s “Take Care,” where we talk to Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky about how sometimes, no matter how cautious you might, be “Montezuma’s Revenge” can still strike.

Kozarsky is a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Emory University School of Medicine, and medical director of TravelWell, a clinic that serves international travelers. She is also a co-founder of the International Society of Travel Medicine and an expert consultant on travelers’ health with the CDC.

jfingas / Flickr

Technology has always been the way of the future. The medical field, typically known for its advanced medical technology, has adopted a new form of service:  mobile.

This week on “Take Care,” health and technology reporter Jennifer Jolly discusses smartphone apps that can bring the doctor’s office to the patients. Jolly recently authored an article for The New York Times Well blog about the mobile doctor apps and how they are changing the medical field.

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