Take Care

Myths about water consumption debunked

Mar 14, 2014
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There are many theories about water consumption: but are they true? Is carbonated water as healthy as still water? Should you drink more fluids when you have a cold ? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen,  speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb,  professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.  Goldfarb debunks some of the myths about drinking water in part two of his interview.

Colonoscopy important for early cancer detection

Mar 9, 2014
wellcome images via Flickr

Colonoscopies easily fall under a category of medical tests that are important to have done, but are not easy to discuss. Colonoscopies have an uncomfortable stigma, despite the fact that most patients report not having a troublesome experience with them.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Rajeev Jain discusses the importance of colonoscopies.  Dr. Jain is a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Health Dallas and clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Jain.

Throwing cold water on popular theories

Mar 9, 2014
darrylh via Flickr

Water, water, everywhere. At least, that's what we've been told.

Health, nutrition, exercise and beauty experts of all kinds have said over the years that we need to consume a certain amount of water per day, that we need to drink water before and after exercise, that drinking lots of water can help you lose weight, that drinking lots of water helps the skin, and the list goes on and on.

But what’s the science behind all these claims?

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldfarb.

How much water does the body really need?

Mar 7, 2014
[cipher] / Flickr

Taking a water bottle to the gym or drinking a certain amount of water each day may seem like good choices.  But do they provide health benefits? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Goldfarb explains what his research has shown about why water is so important to the body but how you may not need as much of it as you think.

The basics of blood work

Feb 28, 2014
Thirteen of Clubs / Flickr

If you're a patient, having your blood drawn for a medical test may be simple for you. But what's done with your blood after it ends up in the tube is probably a big mystery. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Anne Marie Mullin, senior vice president of Laboratory Alliance, a lab that provides testing to a 16-county region in central New York, to find out more about how blood tests really work.

Obsessive habits, bizarre thoughts could be OCD symptoms

Feb 23, 2014
invisiblemonsters / Flickr

Do you know someone who avoids touching door knobs or repeatedly checks to see if the stove is off? Maybe they adjust desk top objects until they are perfectly aligned. This may not be just fussy behavior. Repetitive acts like these could be a result of OCD, obsessive compulsive disorder.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, talks about obsessive compulsive disorder. Zasio is a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety disorders at The Anxiety Treatment Center in California. She has been featured on the A&E television series “Hoarders” and is the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

zen Sutherland / Flickr

Obsessive compulsive disorder is the most common anxiety disorder. At least five million Americans suffer from this disorder, which gives people obsessive thoughts. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Robin Zasio, a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety disorders. Zasio discusses obsessive compulsive disorder, and how its symptoms can affect daily life.

Allergy drops could mean looking forward to spring again

Feb 16, 2014
Nomadic Lass / Flickr

If you've ever used the phrase "a shot in the arm" to describe something as invigorating, you're probably not an allergy sufferer who's had to endure ongoing injections to control symptoms. Shots are not only painful but often inconvenient to schedule into a busy life. Yet that's been the standard course of treatment for many allergy patients for the past hundred years. Recent developments, however, may make shots obsolete for those who suffer from hay fever.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Linda Cox, talks about the new development of allergy drops. Cox is the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and an allergist and immunologist from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Cox.

New medicine may ease allergy suffering

Feb 14, 2014

For those who suffer from allergies, allergy shots are currently the best way to get symptoms under control. But a new development could change that. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Linda Cox, the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Cox discusses allergy drops, which could potentially eliminate allergies for the user.

Poverty not sole indicator of food deserts

Feb 9, 2014
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Did you ever realize how the stores in your neighborhood influence what you eat?  If you're on a tight budget and don't own a car, your food choices are limited to items you can buy within walking distance. Fresh fruits and vegetables aren't usually available at the corner convenience store, and if they are, they're expensive. When the nearest full service market is miles away, eating healthy is a challenge. 

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Bower discusses a new study from Johns Hopkins that found racial makeup determines the food access in a neighborhood. Bower is the lead researcher for the study and also an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kelly Bower.

Poor neighborhoods in urban areas are known as food deserts, where access to grocery stores is limited. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kelly Bower of Johns Hopkins University, who recently led a study that found it isn't just poverty that is an indicator of whether or not supermarkets are readily available in a neighborhood.

You can judge food by its packaging

Feb 2, 2014
Press Release Finder / Flickr

We put a lot of faith in the food we buy. Every time we open up a jar of pickles, a bag of potato chips or a can of soda, we trust that that product will be safe and of a high quality. The package that food is in has a great impact on that safety and quality. And you may not realize there is actual science behind food packaging, which is quite intricate and complex.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joesph Hotchkiss talks about the science of food packaging. Hotchkiss is the director of the School of Packaging and the Center for Packaging Innovation and Sustainability at Michigan State University. He was once a science advisor in the Food and Drug Administration, and holds a Ph.D. in food chemistry.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss.

Tips for living your best life after age 50

Feb 2, 2014
Dark Dwarf / Flickr

Maybe you've taken your good health for granted. But once you turn 50, all bets are off. What you do during this decade will set the stage for a life of continued wellness or one of gradual but irreversible decline. But it's never too late to do the right thing for your body.

This week on Take Care, Huffington Post and AARP columnist Barbara Hannah Grufferman shares three essential tips for staying healthy after age 50. Grufferman has interviewed experts from around the field, and from her findings, she wrote a book called “The Best of Everything After 50.” She also serves as host of "The Best of Everything" on AARP's YouTube Channel.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barbara Hannah Grufferman.

Food packaging does more than protect food

Jan 31, 2014

Every day, American consumers rely on the cans, bottles, boxes and plastic that food is sold in to keep them safe. In fact, scientists research how food packaging can help preserve food and extend shelf life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss, director of the school of packaging at Michigan State University about the science of food packaging.

Linda Lowen: Every package protects its contents, but what is it providing protection against?

Transitioning from child to caregiver

Jan 24, 2014

When aging parents are diagnosed with a chronic illness or terminal disease, often roles are reversed and adult children become the caregivers. The transition can be difficult, but extremely important to the parent's quality of life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, about how to deal with this stage of life.

Can playing as an adult be good for you?

Jan 17, 2014
Eugene Kim / Flickr

You may think playtime is just for children, but research is showing that spending time just playing may be good for your health as an adult. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Gwen Gordon, an expert in the scientific benefits of play.

Lorraine Rapp: What can you tell us about the actual health benefits of play?

Take Care Year in Review

Jan 5, 2014

“Take Care” welcomes the new year by celebrating the one that just passed. We've condensed our shows from 2013 into a half hour of the best of "Take Care" -- vital advice from the leading experts on how to stay healthy and well in the new year and beyond. 

2013 marked the debut of “Take Care.” The show’s tagline, "a conversation on health and wellness," highlights the basic premise that underscores this show: What could we learn if we sat down with some of the world's top authorities in medicine, science and wellness and asked them for their most essential advice?

Out of the dozens of guests Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen spoke to in 2013, we selected nine experts whose practical advice for improving your health is relatively easy to incorporate. They explain why even the smallest investment in your health can have huge returns.

Click 'Read More' to hear "Take Care Year in Review"

How to 'Take Care' in 2014

Jan 3, 2014

Many people make resolutions to be healthier this time of year -- whether that involves nutrition, exercise, or stress reduction. WRVO's weekly health show "Take Care" offers some suggestions if you're still trying to decide how to improve your wellness. Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen take a look back at the advice some of the experts they interviewed offered listeners in 2013.

Why is the U.S. facing a physician shortage?

Dec 22, 2013
Mercy Health / Flickr

As current physicians get older, a recent trend shows that there aren’t enough potential physicians to replace them. Some projections say that by the end of the decade, there will be a shortfall of 90,000 doctors, causing what many are calling a doctor shortage. What happens when there aren’t enough around?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Atul Grover discusses the causes of the nation’s doctor shortage. Dr. Grover is chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Trained as a general internist, Dr. Grover now holds faculty appointments at the George Washington University School of Medicine, and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Grover.

How female friendships improve health after 50

Dec 22, 2013
Flavia Aste / Flickr

Ask women to name the relationships that make their lives meaningful, and female friendships will likely rank high on the list. But having good friends means a great deal more than fun times and girls’ nights out. As women age, their friendships with other women may offer significant health benefits. Recent studies indicate that women can change one another's brain chemistry for the better.

This week on Take Care, Suzanne Braun Levine discusses what makes female friendships so important, especially for older women. Levine is a writer, editor and nationally recognized authority on women and family issues and media. The first editor of Ms. magazine, she was also the first woman editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. Her e-book, "You Gotta Have Girlfriends: A Post-Fifty Posse is Good For Your Health," is the fourth installment in her series, which examines women in “second adulthood.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Suzanne Braun Levine.

Experts say a doctor shortage is on the way

Dec 20, 2013

Many experts believe the United States is facing a doctor shortage in the not-too-distant future. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Atul Grover, the chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges about why there may not be enough physicians and what could be done about it.

Ebb and Flow Photography / Flickr

In the past, hip replacement surgeries were generally reserved for elderly people. Long recovery times and expensive materials sometimes deterred people from getting the procedure. But, as minimally invasive techniques and materials have improved in recent years, the population of people getting hip replacements has changed as a result.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Seth Greenky discusses the current state of hip replacement surgeries. An associate professor in orthopedics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY, Dr. Greenky also co-directs the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph’s Hospital, also in Syracuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Greenky.

Tim Samoff / Flickr

More than 300,000 hip replacements are performed each year, and advancements in the surgery are giving hope to baby boomers who want to continue their active lives. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Seth Greenky, a surgeon and co-director of the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph's Hospital about how hip replacements work, whether you're in your 20s or your 90s.

Michael Mandiberg / Flickr

Depending on how much we get, sleep can either be our best friend or our worst enemy. A good night’s sleep can make us feel refreshed and rejuvenated, while a bad night’s sleep can leave us feeling moody and groggy. So exactly how much rest is needed to call it a good night’s sleep?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Orfeu Buxton discusses sleep deprivation. Buxton is assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, associate neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He participated in a recent Q&A on sleep featured in the New York Times.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Buxton.

Does a healthy gut mean a healthy body?

Dec 8, 2013
mellowynk / Flickr

Emerging research reveals that good digestion and a healthy digestive tract are dependent on beneficial bacteria, also known as probiotics. But you don't have to buy special yogurt to add probiotics to your diet. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi also aid in digestion and improve your immune system. Once you learn the basics of fermenting, it can be a fun and inexpensive way to preserve food at home and add essential nutrients.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy explains the benefits of eating fermented foods. Jeanroy is a newspaper editor, food writer and co-author of the book, "Fermenting for Dummies," published earlier this year. She's been making and eating fermented foods for 20 years and shares her love of preparing food at home on her website, TheFarmingWife.com.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

How much sleep is enough?

Dec 6, 2013
Tony Alter / Flickr

Getting a good night's sleep is easier for some people than others. But research has shown it's essential for everyone. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Orfeu Buxton, a neuroscientist and sleep researcher from Harvard, about the health issues a lack of sleep can cause.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you tell us what role does sleep play in our overall health?

Don't be afraid, social anxiety is beatable

Nov 24, 2013
Cavale Doom / Flickr

We're at that time of year when holiday parties and social activities crowd our social calendar. You may dread the office party and worry about what to wear, but that's a common anxiety many of us face.  But according to the National Institutes of Health, millions of Americans suffer from something much worse -- extreme fear of being scrutinized and judged by others. When the fear is so debilitating it disrupts daily life, it’s social anxiety disorder, a chronic mental health condition also known as social phobia.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, discusses social anxiety and how to overcome the disorder. Zasio is a nationally-known clinical psychologist who specializes in this field. She's familiar to many from her appearances on the A&E television series “Hoarders.” Zasio is also the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline

Nov 24, 2013
Liz Henry / Flickr

Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Sherry Willis, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.

Millions of Americans suffer from social anxiety disorder, an extreme fear of being judged by others in social situations. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with doctor Robin Zasio, a nationally known clinical psychologist and author about what social anxiety disorder is and how to treat it.

Lorraine Rapp: would you explain the difference between just being shy and actual social anxiety?

Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke

Nov 15, 2013

Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.

Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?

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