Take Care

The word on cranberries for UTI treatment

Feb 11, 2017
Cheri Neufeld / Flickr

For many a generation, mothers and grandmothers alike have sworn by cranberry juice as a suitable home remedy for urinary tract infections (UTIs).

To understand the science behind this treatment option, Dr. Rose Khavari, assistant professor of urology at the Institute for Academic Medicine at Houston Methodist Hospital, joined “Take Care” for a conversation on UTIs and the effectiveness of cranberry juice and cranberry supplements.

Keeping sheets sanitary & germ-free

Feb 10, 2017
jurek d. / Flickr

There's nothing nicer than clean sheets and towels. But can dirty linens actually be unhealthy? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Philip Tierno, a microbiologist at the NYU School of Medicine, about how hospitals and hotels should be cleaning their bedsheets -- and what you can catch if they don't. Tierno is also the author of "The Secret Life of Germs: Observations and Lessons from a Microbe Hunter."

Alternative therapies -- safe and effective?

Feb 4, 2017
Jena Al-Awadhi / Flickr

Everyone wants to feel their best, but with so many products on the health market, it can be difficult to know which are truly effective. Today, many medical consumers are turning to alternative medicines and therapies in an effort to increase their overall health and well-being. So which ones are safe, and which actually work?

To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Josephine Briggs, director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. A Harvard and Yale-trained physician, Briggs researches and reports on various therapies to provide the public with the information necessary to decide whether a certain practice is beneficial.

Getting your calcium – dairy vs. dietary supplements

Feb 4, 2017
Guy Montag/Flickr

Calcium is essential for healthy bones, but could getting it from supplements be doing more harm than good?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Taylor Wallace, affiliate professor in the department of Nutrition and Food Studies at George Mason University and former senior director of science, policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation, discusses the effects that taking calcium supplements could have on cardiovascular health.

Calcium supplement controversy

Feb 3, 2017
Catherine Loper / WRVO News

Many people try to increase their consumption of calcium to help prevent osteoperosis. But there has been some research that indicates that calcium supplements could increase the risk of heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Taylor Wallace, a professor in nutrition and food studies at George Mason University, about the controversy over calcium supplements. Wallace is also the former senior director of science policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Ano Lobb / Flickr

More and more Americans are seeking non-traditional therapies to find relief from symptoms and pain and to maintain overall health. But if you're a medical consumer interested in complementary or integrative treatments, how do you know what's safe and what's effective? One reliable source is the National Institutes of Health.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Josephine Briggs, director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at NIH gives an overview of these kinds of therapies – and what to look out for. A Harvard- and Yale-trained physician, Briggs is recognized internationally for her research accomplishments. The center she heads investigates and researches these therapies and informs the general public of their findings.

Hotels for hospital patients

Jan 28, 2017
Elizabeth Greene / Flickr

Would you prefer to stay in a hospital or a hotel? If you’re in need of medical treatment, you may now have the option to choose.

This week on “Take Care,” The New York Times reporter C.J. Hughes discusses the rise of hospital-hotel rooms and “medical tourism,” a trend he covered in his article “Trading Hospital Rooms for Hotel Suites.”

Liver health impacted by circadian clock

Jan 21, 2017
Brendan Landis / Flickr

When we think of our “body clock,” sleep patterns are probably what first come to mind. But new research in the field of chronobiology -- the science of biological rhythms -- indicates certain organs have their own rhythm and clock. And altering the pattern of those rhythms can harm your health.

This week on “Take Care,” Shannon Bailey, a professor of pathology  and environmental health sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, discusses the importance of the metabolic clock of the liver. Bailey’s research investigates how genetic, environmental, and life-style factors influence liver diseases.

Daniel Cukler / Flickr

While many agree that it’s good practice to eat vegetables regularly, what about going all-in and committing to a vegetarian diet? These days, leading health experts point to the diet’s many benefits, as long as you do your homework. Should you include eggs and dairy? How much protein is essential to good health? How do you eat a balanced and nutritious vegetarian diet?

This week on “Take Care,” advice on how to eat a healthy vegetarian diet from one of the nation’s top experts on nutrition, Dr. Donald Hensrud. Hensrud is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller “The Mayo Clinic Diet.” He’s also chair of the Division of Preventive, Occupations and Aerospace Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Spice health heroes

Jan 14, 2017
Simply_Happy / Flickr

All amateur cooks have them in their pantries – spices. But some spices can provide more than just flavor, they can provide health benefits.

This week on “Take Care,” chef and author Natasha MacAller discusses the healing power of spices. MacAller wrote "Spice Health Heroes: Unlock the Power of Spice for Flavor and Wellbeing." It's a cookbook that includes a detailed study of the history and traditional uses of spices along with their culinary, nutritional and medical applications.

Increased media use and its toll on relationships

Jan 14, 2017
Pablo Romeo / Flickr

With technology at our fingertips and connections easier than ever to make, you’d think we’d all have fulfilling relationships with people near and far. But even in our highly-connected world, we’re becoming less capable of forming and functioning in relationships.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Vinita Mehta talks about why so many people feel disconnected. Dr. Mehta is a licensed clinical psychologist, journalist and media expert. Her article, “Have We Become Less Capable of Forming Relationships?” appears in Psychology Today’s Head Games blog.

Spice up your health

Jan 13, 2017
Tony Mendez / Flickr

Many of us think of spices as just ingredients for cooking. But for centuries, some have believed in their medicinal powers. And science is proving some of that ancient lore to be correct. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Natasha MacAller, the author of the book "Spice Health Heroes: Unlock the Power of Spice for Flavor and Wellbeing," about the basics of spices and their health properties.

Culture, contagions & epic epidemics

Jan 7, 2017

Recent epidemics like Ebola and the Zika virus worried health officials and ordinary citizens alike. But they paled in comparison to some historical outbreaks like the bubonic plague and the Spanish flu. Outbreaks of disease fascinate and scare us, but more importantly, inform us about how to cope with the next fast-spreading contagion that comes along.

This week on “Take Care,” the author of a new book explores the history-making epidemics and what can be learned from them. Beth Skwarecki is a science writer for publications including Public Health Perspectives, Lifehacker, Science Magazine, and Scientific American. Her new book is "Outbreak!: 50 Tales of Epidemics That Terrorized the World."

Why finding a gym is 'kind of like a relationship'

Jan 7, 2017
Mike_fleming / Flickr

Gyms can run the gamut. On one end, an upscale gym can supply fresh towels, personal training, a sauna, racquet ball courts and a full schedule of the best new exercise classes. On the other, you may find yourself waiting in line for a treadmill, wondering when the weights were last cleaned and avoiding the changing rooms altogether.

Joining us this week on “Take Care,” is Anna Medaris Miller, who is a health and wellness reporter at U.S. News & World Report. Miller shares advice on finding the right gym for you.

What epidemics tell us about society

Jan 6, 2017

The Zika and Ebola epidemics have caused concern around the world about how to fight the spread of these diseases. But the way experts approached these health crises was influenced by past experience. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Beth Skwarecki, science writer and author of the book "Outbreak!: 50 Tales of Epidemics that Terrorized the World" about the history of epidemics, how societies deal with them, and why we find them so interesting.

Doby Photography / NPR

Every year, the Take Care production team tries to bring our listeners the most relevant, interesting and current topics in health and wellness. Our aim is to bring you the information you need from the nation’s experts, but we’re not the only ones with this goal.

Diet, disease, and detrimental fats

Dec 17, 2016

Just how much of a role does diet play in overall health? And what dietary advice is best to follow?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Walter Willett, chair of the Nutrition Department at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition, discusses what we've learned from nutrition studies over the years and how that information has helped shape dietary guidelines to improve human health.

Trying to treat infertility

Dec 17, 2016
@joefoodie / Flickr

Infertility does not discriminate. The disease is a little more common for women as they get older but it can affect anyone and everyone, according to Dr. Eve Feinberg.

This week on “Take Care,” Feinberg joins the program to discuss the causes of infertility, the right time to seek out specialist assistance and how initial consults and treatments generally will go. She is an OB/GYN and reproductive endocrinologist, as well as the medical director of Northwestern Medicine Fertility and Reproductive Medicine in Highland Park, Illinois.

cogdogblog / Flickr

The year 2016 was full of developments in the world of health -- including some health studies that contradicted each other. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Scott Hensley, the host of NPR's health blog “Shots,” about some of the most important health stories of the year, and how to sort through conflicting medical news.

Andrew Malone / Flickr

Ultrasounds are an essential part of ensuring a healthy pregnancy, but can too much exposure to them cause more harm than good? This is the question that has been raised by the recent rise of non-medical keepsake ultrasounds.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mary Norton, medical geneticist and nationally recognized expert in prenatal genetic diagnosis discusses the potential risks of unnecessary ultrasounds. Dr. Norton is also a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of California San Francisco, and is the president of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine.

Tai chi can benefit mind & body

Dec 10, 2016
Thomas Leuthard / Flickr

Sometimes, a martial art can be peaceful.

Tai chi is a mind and body exercise rooted in a number of Asian traditions, including martial arts, which combines slow intentional movements, breathing and a number of important mental skills.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Peter Wayne joined the program to share the health benefits of tai chi, the best way to reap those advantages and how they can also provide a financial assistance.

Mark Ordonez / Flickr

Is your cookware posing a hazard to your health? In recent years, some lightweight, non-stick materials have been scrutinized for containing toxic chemicals that can seep into food.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Laura Vandenberg, assistant professor in the environmental health sciences department at the UMass-Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences, joins the program to discuss which materials are safe to use when cooking.

Inside the surgical suite

Dec 3, 2016
Ruhrfisch / Flickr

For many of us, our knowledge of what happens in an operating room may come from medical dramas on TV. But what really happens in the surgical suite after the patient is anesthesized?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Hoyt, executive director of the American College of Surgeons takes us inside the surgical suite. Hoyt is also Professor Emeritus of surgery at the University of California, Irvine.

A different kind of doctor

Nov 19, 2016
Alex Proimos / Flickr

The nurse comes in to take vitals and ask some questions. Then, he or she says the doctor will be in shortly.

Short. That ends up describing the time the doctor spends with you. Many have had a similar experience when going to see their doctor. But, what if that didn’t have to be the case? What if there were doctors who took more time to really dig into a patient’s problem?

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Pina LoGiudice, a naturopathic doctor, joins the program to talk about who exactly those in her field are, what it is they do for their patients, and how they are different from traditional medical doctors.

Preventing and coping with holiday depression

Nov 19, 2016
Chad Sparkes / Flickr

It’s that time of year again to spread joy for all to hear—or so you’re told. Although the holiday season can create happy memories, it can also be a stressful time and leave many with feelings of depression for various reasons.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Ken Duckworth talks about holiday depression, what may cause it, and how to support those who suffer from it. Duckworth is the medical director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), and is also an assistant clinical professor at Harvard University Medical School.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources / Flickr

You may have heard the term "naturopathic medicine" as it is gaining in popularity. But what are the theories behind it? And what's the difference in a naturopathic doctor versus a traditional M.D.? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Pina LoGuidice, a naturopathic doctor who has taught at New York University and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine.

Cost effective drugs are still effective

Nov 12, 2016
zacharmstrong / Flickr

 

Generic drugs and brand name drugs have a number of differences. They can have different names, different colors and different prices to name a few. However, these differences do not necessarily mean generics and brand names don’t have the same effects.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Elizabeth Higdon, an instructor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences campus in Colchester, Vermont, joins the program to talk about the quality of generic drugs, why they’re different from brand names and their benefits.

Higdon holds a doctor of pharmacy degree, teaches classes on over-the-counter medications and works as a community pharmacist.

Peace of mind for hospice patients' pets

Nov 11, 2016
Giorgio Quattrone / Flickr

When a patient goes under hospice care, their well being and comfort is the priority. But in this stressful time, families are often unable to care for the patient’s pet. But sometimes a pet's unequivocal love is exactly what the hospice patient needs. Now, a national organization is trying to help fix this problem. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the president and founder of Pet Peace of Mind, Dianne McGill.

Whole grains add more than carbs and calories to a diet

Nov 5, 2016
George Wesley & Bonita Dannells / Flickr

An estimated 20 to 30 percent of the population has trended toward gluten-free products in an attempt to avoid whole grains these days. According to Dr. Donald Hensrud of the Mayo Clinic, people who are not gluten intolerant should eat those whole grains for their many different health advantages.

This week on “Take Care,” Hensrud, the medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and editor of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller, “The Mayo Clinic Diet,” talks about what whole grains are and their benefits.

Using hypnosis for more than just entertainment

Nov 5, 2016
Adam Dachis / Flickr

Hypnosis is often demonstrated in the entertainment world as someone dangling a stopwatch in front of another’s face telling them they’re “getting very sleepy,” and then when the person awakes, engaging in some bizarre behavior. But there’s more value to hypnosis than just entertainment.

Hypnosis can be used to medically treat disorders that involve the brain -- such as anxiety, stress, pain, and bad habits. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Spiegel of Stanford University explains the medical value of hypnosis. Spiegel is Willson Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of the Center on Stress and Health, and Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford School of Medicine.

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