tax free zones

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office / via Flickr

New York’s plan to attract new business and jobs to the state by offering them tax-free space at public colleges is underway. Officials Tuesday outlined for the first time specifics about how the program will work.

They tried to lay out the plan as simply as possible:

"There’s no fine print. There’s no trips and traps, caveats; there’s no taxes," said Executive Vice President of Startup-NY Leslie Whatley in a conference call with reporters.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

SUNY trustees have voted to split the University of Albany and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, to create the system's 65th SUNY campus. The founder of the college says the move will save SUNY money and help bring high tech jobs to New York state.

The plans is to have the new specialized college up and running in the 2014-2015 academic year, says Alain Kaloyeros, the school's CEO.

"What the governor and the chancellor want out of this is have  the MIT or Stanford out of SUNY.  A state of the art, scholarly hub  at an affordable tuition," he said.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is hoping a three-pronged agenda can revitalize a shrinking economy across upstate New York.  In Syracuse on Thursday, Cuomo touted a Financial Restructuring Board that will help struggling local governments, a proposal to bring resort gaming upstate, and START-UP NY as ways to jump start an upstate economy that's been losing jobs for years. The START-UP NY plan will make SUNY campuses entrepreneurial tax-free zones, that the governor says will help keep new businesses in the state.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Deals have been reached between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders on siting new casinos and creating tax free zones at college campuses. But a bill on abortion rights was struggling, and reform measures appear dead for the session.

The agreement on casinos would allow four resort-style gambling centers; one in the Capital Region, one in the Southern Tier, and possibly two in the Catskills, if voters approve the change to the state’s constitution in the fall.

Nassau and Suffolk counties would be allowed to open more slot machines, under the terms of the bill.