ticks

John Tann / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s health commissioner received a grilling from state senators at a hearing this week on whether New York is doing enough to combat tick-borne illnesses.

Health Commissioner Howard Zucker told the senators that this year, there are fewer deer ticks and fewer reported cases of Lyme disease in the state.

But, he said, the number of Lone Star ticks is up. They can carry diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and even cause someone to become allergic to eating red meat.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The threat from tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease is at an all time high in New York state. At a recent forum sponsored by the New York State Department of Health and state Sen. John DeFrancisco (R-Syracuse), experts hope more information about prevention of the bacterial disease can reduce the number of people that are infected.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

State Sen. John DeFrancisco (R-Syracuse) hopes putting the spotlight on Lyme disease can help prevent it. Experts and victims of the debilitating illness recently met at Ryder Park in DeWitt in an effort to put a personal face on the disease.

Tick-borne diseases on the move

Jun 17, 2017
Macroscopic Solutions / Flickr

Residents of the Northeastern U.S. have become increasingly familiar with Lyme disease, which is transmitted by ticks. But the tick population in this country is spreading and growing, and along with it, so are the diseases they carry.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Richard Ostfeld, senior scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, a not-for-profit research institution in Millbrook, New York, discusses the latest information on ticks and tick-borne diseases. The Cary Institute examines the science behind environmental solutions. Ostfeld also teaches at Rutgers University and the University of Connecticut, and has authored the book, "Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a Complex System."

Fairfax County / Flickr

Many residents of the Northeast are familiar with Lyme disease. But the tick population in this country is increasing -- and so are the number of tick-borne diseases and the number of people contracting them. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Richard Ostfeld, a disease ecologist with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York.

This week: Lyme disease and adrenal gland surgery

Jan 30, 2016

Prevention is the best way to control Lyme disease, by dressing properly for the outdoors, checking skin afterward and quickly and carefully removing any ticks.

On this week's show, Dr. Caitlin Sgarlet and Dr. Jana Shaw explain how Lyme disease is usually treated successfully with a short course of antibiotics. They also tell how the disease is diagnosed, its typical symptoms and why they advise against the long-term use of antibiotics for Lyme disease patients with lingering problems.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

Lyme disease has been spreading in upstate New York for the past few years. For example, there were 57 cases in Oswego County in 2014 compared to just five cases in 2009. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) has introduced legislation that he says would help prevent the disease and educate the public.

Debi Collins found a bullseye rash on her arm, six weeks after she had been working outside one day. Her doctor told her they didn't have Lyme disease in Madison County.

John Tann / Flickr

You may have had your last cold a few months ago, but did you know that there are many ways you can get sick during the summer? Taking some time to familiarize yourself with summer illnesses before stepping outside can go a long way towards staying healthy this season.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Cynthia Morrow discusses summertime diseases in our area and how to avoid them.  Morrow is a public health physician and teaches public health and preventive medicine at Upstate Medical University.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Cynthia Morrow.

How to avoid Lyme disease

Jun 23, 2013
John Tann / Flickr

Lyme disease is no longer just a risk for those “outdoorsy” people. Now if you’re gardening, playing in the backyard or outside at all, you can be at risk for Lyme disease. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Cynthia Morrow, Onondaga County Health Commissioner, about the increased risk of Lyme disease in the area.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Cynthia Morrow.

John Tann / Flickr

Lyme disease is on the rise in many parts of the country -- including right here in central and northern New York. But what is this disease and how does it spread?

Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show, "Take Care," spoke with Onondaga County Health Commissioner Dr. Cynthia Morrow about how to recognize the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease.

Lorraine Rapp: How concerned should we be?

John Tann / Flickr

Victims of Lyme disease converge on Albany today for an awareness rally meant to focus attention on the tick-borne disease, that can attack a person's skin, nervous system, heart or joints. Over 95,000 cases have been reported to the New York State Health Department since Lyme disease became reportable in 1986, including hundreds in central New York.

Researchers are warning of a higher concentration of ticks this summer and thus more potential for tick-borne illnesses – like Lyme disease.

That’s because more ticks survived the warmer winter.

As a result, Senator Charles Schumer is pushing legislation that would increase education and research.