trees

Photo Dean / via Flickr

With leaves on the ground and snow falling, trees in upstate New York are becoming dormant for the winter, but urban tree cover is still important.

As many urban areas become more populated or new buildings are constructed, urban trees are often chopped down. Most cities in the country are losing tree cover. And it has consequences.

"Trees are not just decorative. They’re infrastructure. And hence, they’re important for that reason," said Emanuel Carter, a professor at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

SUNY ESF

The State University of New York School of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse has figured out a way to grow an American chestnut tree that won’t die from a blight that’s virtually decimated the species over the last hundred years. It all comes down to genes.

American chestnut trees are an iconic species in American culture. Wildlife has relied on them, streets were named after them, and you can’t avoid mention of them in music during the holiday season.

John Weeks continues the story of a maple tree near his house. He describes how the tree was cut and how old the tree was. He tells the story of the trees life and growth. He explains even though trees offer shade and beauty, they are much more important than that.

John Weeks discusses visiting home and returning to sentimental places. He comments on all of the changes since his last visit. The changes in nature offer a look into what the environment will be like for future generations.

John Weeks tells a story about a tree close to his house. He appreciates this tree because it shades his house from the hottest days of the summer. The tree was damaged earlier in it's life and never recovered. The tree might be cut down for a highway.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Last week's federal report on climate change puts the spotlight on how increasing global temperatures will affect the world. One Syracuse University professor is trying to localize that by creating a climate garden on campus that will show the effects of climbing temperatures on trees in central New York.

In this archived broadcast from July 22, 1988 John Weeks talks about taking a trip to the flat fields of Ontario Lake Plain. He grew up in this area and he describes what his house used to look like along with the woods that were in his backyard. He mentions the different birds and how things have changed over the years that he has moved.

Matt Martin / WSKG

Every year Christmas tree farmers lose a portion of their crop to a fungus that attacks the root of the tree.  One tree farm in the Southern Tier has started planting a species that seems to be more resistant to the disease.

Cornell University Cooperate Extension Onondaga County

The emerald ash borer is getting closer to Onondaga County. The Asian beetle infests and kills North American ash trees, and are as close to central New York as Rochester.  Now, Cornell Cooperative Extension is recruiting volunteers for a program in Onondaga County that could  let wasps sound the alarm that the devastating bugs are here.

So how does a wasp tell us that the Emerald Ash Borer is in town?  Simple. They eat them.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

SUNY ESF is working to bring back a tree that once made up one quarter of the standing timber in forests in the Eastern United States. Now, researchers have come up with a variety of the tree that resists the blight that killed billions of American chestnut trees.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources / Flickr

It's only a matter of time before the ash tree population in central New York is decimated by the Emerald Ash Borer. A task force is at work getting ready for the invasion of the deadly insects, that are now in massive numbers only two counties away from Onondaga County.

Let It Snow

Dec 28, 2012

John Weeks discusses the effect snow has on shrubs, trees, and animals. He makes the point that a tape measure snowstorm effects man far more than the creatures in nature.

Woodsman Pare That Tree

Sep 1, 2012

Why is it that a bird can fly through a tree canopy repeatedly without so much as a ding to a wing but a golf ball will find a limb every time?  No answer here, but Jim has some great tips for pruning your trees to enhance their appearance.  Careful pruning will add elegance to your landscape for years to come.

Just Add Water

Sep 1, 2012

Feeling cranky because it's too hot, sticky and uncomfortable to work outside?  Think of it this way: when is the last time you had to shovel sunshine?   To improve your disposition, jump into a cold shower, then go out and water those thirsty plants and trees.  Nothing to it - just add water.

Trees are Tribal

Sep 1, 2012

When a breeze blows through the trees is the wind talking - or are the trees chit-chatting? Trees are tribal.  They protect one another from dings and nicks of lawnmowers, and, working together, manage the soil around their roots much more effectively than do man-made lawn chemicals.

John Weeks reminisces on his early life in the countryside of central New York. Since childhood, Weeks has studied nature. He recounts the plants and wildlife that left a lasting impression on him early in life.

Originally aired on July 22, 1988.

Highways of Silk

Jun 13, 2012

John Weeks talks about Tent Caterpillars and their effect on apple and cherry trees. Weeks explains how these insects, usual thought of as pests, serve a necessary role in the ecosystem. In fact, the Tent Caterpillars are not really harmful to the trees at all.

Originally aired June 19,1987.

The Vernal Apple Tree

May 29, 2012

John Weeks explains his affection for the apple tree. Weeks discusses the trees' natural beauty, their relationship with songbirds and how they must be treasured and maintained.

John Weeks talks about Gaylord Nelson, also known as "the father of Earth day" and his history of how he became to be know what he is today. Weeks also talks about how consistent Nelson in developing an environmental ethic and protecting nature.                      

Originally aired on April 19th, 1990.

John Weeks discusses plants and trees and the first spurt of spring growth and how the April sunlight affects the blooming buds of the season.

 

Orignally aired on April 22nd, 1988.

A Visit To Baltimore Woods

Apr 17, 2012

John Weeks takes a trip to Baltimore Woods, seeking signs of the upcoming spring season, exploring all kinds of things involved in nature including plants, animals and trees.

 

Originally aired on April 19th, 1985.

How to Tap Maple Trees

Mar 6, 2012

John Weeks explains how to tap a maple tree step by step.

Originally aired March 9th, 1984.