University of Rochester

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The science community was buzzing this week with news of a breakthrough in stem cell research. Stem cells have the potential to transform into any tissue in the body, and are being explored as treatment options for trauma and degenerative diseases.

When we’re born, our cells are programmed to carry out a specific role. They automatically become muscle cells, skin cells, nerve cells, and that role can’t be changed.

But stem cells can be manipulated to become any kind of cell, offering the potential for regeneration in the body.

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Chemotherapy is one of the best known forms of cancer treatment, and while often effective, it can leave behind a number of side effects, like hair loss and nausea. Some who have undergone chemotherapy also have claimed to have felt foggy, forgetful and not as sharp as they were before the treatment. Largely ignored by the medical community in the past, this symptom, which is referred to as “chemo brain,” is finally starting to come to the forefront in medical research.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Michelle Janelsins talks about the research she and others are now conducting on chemo brain. Janelsins is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery, Cancer Control at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, where she got her PhD.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Janelsins.

Chemotherapy can cause many side effects like hair loss and nausea. But for years, many cancer patients have said it causes something else, forgetfulness and memory loss, or what cancer survivors call "chemo brain." Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Michelle Janelsins of the University of Rochester, who is leading a research study into chemotherapy's effects on cognitive function.

Lorraine Rapp: The term “chemo brain” is relatively new. How do researchers and medical doctors actually define that term?

Copper is an important aspect of proper nutrition, and vital for us to maintain a healthy body. But a group of upstate New York researchers have concluded too much copper in our diet could be a contributing factor in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Tap water coming through copper pipes, fruits, vegetables, red meat and nuts; these are all sources of copper that we consume on a daily basis.

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Watson, the IBM supercomputer, is best known for its historic win on the television game show, Jeopardy. But, the same components that made the system a quiz show winner could be redirected toward lowering the cost of health care in upstate New York.

According to Steve Gold, vice president for IBM’s Watson Solutions division, the amount of available medical knowledge doubles every five years. While that can provide a challenge for individual physicians to keep up with, it’s something Watson thrives on.

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Researchers in upstate New York have identified the chemical that leads to cancer resistance in laboratory animals: naked mole rats.

The discovery could eventually lead to new cancer treatments and even the ability for cancer resistance in humans according to the authors.

University of Rochester

Researchers in western New York have been using brain scans to add to our understanding of how humans comprehend numbers. The new data could have implications in diagnosing learning disabilities earlier on, and aid in our understanding of why some kids struggle at school.

Imagine a dialysis machine small enough that a patient could wear it. A super-thin filtering material may allow researchers at the University of Rochester to revolutionize dialysis for patients with kidney disease.

Remember the mood ring? Well the smart phone of the future may be able to identify your mood based on the sound of your voice.

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A new facility in upstate New York is being touted as the ‘bridge’ from research to stem cell therapies that could potentially cure conditions like cancer, Alzheimer’s, and spinal damage.